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$2.95/ CAN. $3.50 JAN. 1986 




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the^ttBries of 
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STRATEGY AND 
ACTION GAMES! 

• THE HAUNTED CASTLE 

• KNOCKOUT 

« THE MARTIAN 
MONSTERS 



UTILITIES! 

• INFRARAID 

BASIC RELOCATOR 
- MEMORY CHECK 
» SCRATCH PAD 
■ ALARM CLOCK 






FREE MODEM 

AND i 

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MEMBERSHIP KIT 
DETAILS ON PAGE 81 












Shake, battle & role. 



Warm up your Commodore* and get ready for 
full-screen graphic action. 

Save the industrial world from going off the 
deep end of the Richter scale in Quake Minus 
One. Stop the terrorists from triggering a 
massive earthquake and toppling civilization. 

In Shadow/ire, Ambassador Kryxix has 
been kidnapped. You have but 100 real-time 
minutes to assemble a strike force of spe- 
cialists and elite fighters to rescue him and 
then destroy the evil Zoff and his starship. 

Fmbark on a quest to defeat Doomdark 



l**«i 



w. 



epi 



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in The Lords ofMidniqht. Choose your role. Capture 

the source of Doomdark's power or 
" f conquer his forces in battle. Over 32,000 
different panoramas ensure a challenge, 

Visit your software dealer. Ask to see the 
new Beyond Line from Mindscape. And 
discover graphics, adventure, excitement, and 
fun that's beyond belief. 



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e BBt^rtscapttlnaAUnghls reserved. »Wfi& Beyond. Licensed in conjunction with IrtemirtionaH "■- ;"-!■ '<■" -i> ' .iimnidinc- is .iirftdurnwhoJOininYidore Business Machines 
Reader Serv Ice No. 177 Mindsca po is 11 trademark of Mindscape, I n c 




DEPARTMENTS 

A View from the Bridge... of tin- January issue o/Ahoy! 
Scuttlebutt. ..what 's coming your Commodore's way in '86, 
Errata. .. corrections to Rhythmic Bits, Lightning Loader. 



45 



Art Gallery. . . move over, Michelangelo and da Vinci! 



76 



Reviews. .. the latest C-64 and C-128 software and hardware. 78 



Commodores. . .programmed to puzzle and perplex you. 



TOO 



Tips Ahoy I... move over, Rupert and Card! 



106 



Program Listings... take your pick and punch them in! 



113 



FEATURES 



The Magical Link by Dale Rupert* 



20 



Speech Synthesizers, Part II by Morton Kevelson 



32 



Ahoy! Babbler /Talking Clock by Isaac Michalowski** 



38 



Entertainment Software: Calling Computer Coaches 
Programs That Write Themselves by Mark Andrews*** 



47 



92 



Cadet's Column: Printer Basics by Cheryl Peterson 



95 



♦Includes programs: RS-232 Receiver, ASCII Transmitter, 

Sequential Transmitter, Sequential Receiver (for the VIC and 64) 

* includes programs: Talking Clock and Ahoy! Babbler 

(for the VIC 20 and C-64) 

** includes program: Sketcher (for the C-64) 



PROGRAMS 



Streamer Font for the C-64 by Bob Spirko 



28 



BASIC Relocator for the C-64 by James E. Hosek 



30 



Memory Check for the C-64 by Buck Childress 



46 



The Haunted Castle for the C-64 by Derrick Bnmdage 
Knockout for the C-64 by Tony Branmer 



60 



70 



The Martian Monsters for the C-64 by James C. Hilty 



72 



Microsim for the C-64 by Tim Gerchmez 



89 



Scratch Pad for the C-64 by Don Schmidt 



91 



Alarm Clock for the C-64 by Tony St. Clair 



99 



Infraraid for the C-64 by Timothy VanDeventer 



110 



Bug Repellents for the VIC & 64 by Kleinert and Barron 1 1 6 

Flankspeed for the C-64 by Gordon F. Wheat 116 

Caver art by Jamos Regan; art/ photography intlda screens by Javier Romero, Morton Kevelion 



Publisher 
Michael Schneider 

Editor 
David Allikas 

Managing Editor 
Michael Davila 

Senior Editor 

Tim Moriarty 

Technical Editors 

David Barron 

Bob Lloret 

Consulting Editors 

Ben Bova 

Morton Kevelson 

Dale Rupert 

Entertainment Editor 
Arnie Katt 

Art Director 
Jo Ann Case 

Production Director 
Melissa Held 

Art Production 

Christopher Carter 

Mark Hammerer 

Victoria Green 

Bulletin Board SYSOP 
B.W. Behting 

Circulation Director 
W. Charles Squires 

Advertising Director 
Lynne Dominkk 

Director of Promotion 
Joyce K. Fuchs 

Controller 
Dan Tunick 

Managing Director 
Richard Stevens 

Advertising Representative 

JE Publishers' Representative 

6855 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 200 

Los Angeles, CA 90038 

(213)467-2266 
Boston (617)437-7628 
Dallas (214)660-2253 
New York (212)724-7767 
Chicago (312)445-2489 
Denver (303)595-4331 
San Francisco (415)864-3252 



ISSUE NO. 25 



JANUARY 1986 



Ahoy! (#8750-4383) is published monthly by Ion In- 
ternational Inc., 45 W. 34lh St., Suite 407. New York, 
NY, 10001. Subscription rate: U issues for S 19.95, 14 
issues for S37.95 (Canada S16.95 and $49.95 respec- 
tively). Second CUM postage paid lit New York, NY 
10001 und additional midline, offices. c 1986 by Ion 
International Inc. Alt rights reserved. c under Uni- 
versal International and l\in American Copyright 
conventions. Reproduction of editorial or pictorial 
content In any manner is prohibited. No responsi- 
bility can be accepted for unsolicited material. Post- 
master, send address changes to Ahoy,', 45 W. 34th 
Street, Suite 407, New York, NY' 10001. Direct all ad- 
dress changes or matters concerning jour subscrip- 
tion to Ahoy!, P.O. Bos #341, Ml. Morris, II. 61054. 
Alt editorial inquiries and software and hardware tu 
be res letted should be sent to Ahoy!, 45 W, 34th St., 
Suite 407, New York, NY 10001. 



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y ll=W FROM THI= I3RIDG | = n 




' hat could we do, we wondered, to com- 
memorate our second anniversary? We 
do our best to delight the serious Com- 
modore user every month of the year 
anyway -and you can't do better than your best! But, we 
finally reasoned, we can do more of it! And so, though 
this issue includes significantly less advertising than our 
last few, we've maintained the same 148 page count (144 
if you're picky and don't count covers). That means more 
editorial pages - including (depending, again, on how you 
count) 13 complete programs! 

As for feature articles, we've our usual abundance of 
them as well -with the exception of Creating Your Own 
Games on the Commodore 64. Was Orson Scott Card 
simply unable to meet this month's deadline after three 
straight weeks of 16-hour days programming last month's 
Gypsy Starship— or did a band of roving gypsies take 
exception to his depiction of their race? You'll have to 
see if his column returns next month to find out. 

• Morton Kevelson's survey of Speech Synthesizers for 
the Commodore Computers concludestthis month with 
a look at (or is that a listen to?) VIC-Talker, Hearsay 64, 
and LISNER 1000. (Turn to page 32.) Coincidentally, 
while Morton prepared his two-part review, the perfect 
companion piece walked in our door— a speech synthe- 
sizer construction project. Morton worked with creator 
Isacc Michalowski to bring the Ahoy! Babbler/Talking 
Clock to fruition. (Turn to page 38.) 

• This month's Rupert Report continues to explore Tlte 
Magical Link through which computers can talk to each 
other -the RS232 serial port. By the time Dale Rupert 
is done, the C-64's in your room may keep you awake 
nights with their gabbing. (Turn to page 20.) 

• As our cover announces, Streamer Font is a banner 
program. Literally! Bob Spirko's latest lets you generate Print 
Shop-like banners of unlimited length. (Turn to page 28.) 

• In addition to surveying the field of team sports 
simulations for the 64 in this month's Entertainment Softwire 
Section, Arnie Katz and company provide full-length reviews 
of Karate Champ, Alice in Videoiand, Star Rank Boxing, 
Hacker, and Hie Island Caper. (Turn to page 47.) 

• Microsim lacks the cockpit window view of full-blown 
flight simulators, but includes a respectably complete in- 
strument panel. (Turn to page 89.) 

• Remember Alice in Adventureland, published last Jan- 
uary? So do strategy game lovers around the country, who've 
clamored ever since for another game of like quality! Prob- 
lem is, we didn't have one... until Derrick Brundage wrote 
Vie Haunted Castle, featured in this issue. (Turn to page 
60.) And because the average arcade action game would 
look sick sharing an issue with Derrick's sparkler, we've 
included Vie Martian Monsters. (Turn to page 72.) Finally, 
to insure that the games in this issue knock you out, we've 



included - Knockout! 

• This month's programming utilities are too numerous 
to describe, but their names should be enough to get you 
typing: BASIC Relocator, Scratch Pad, Alarm Clock, Mem- 
ory Check, and Infraraid. The documentation for the last- 
named program is in itself a complete article on identifying 
and trapping bugs in your programs. 

Nor do we have room to describe what Mark Andrews 
and Cheryl Peterson have in store for you this month (in 
Commodore Roots and Cadet's Column, respectively). 
Or about the many products featured in this issue's 
Reviews section. But we're sure you can find your way. 

If you haven't yet subscribed to Ahoy!, perhaps the offer 
in this issue will provide you with the needed incentive. 
For no more than the price of a year's subscription, you 
can now receive 12 issues of Ahoy! and a free PlayNET 
membership kit -A $19.95 value! Some conditions apply. 
See page 81 for detaUs. 

See the rest of this issue of Ahoy! for the best in 
Commodore home computing. Happy anniversary! 

-David Allikas 



MERLIN 64 

TH E BEST MACRO ASS EMB LER FOR THE COMMODORE 64 

Easy to use for the beginner or professional, Merlin 64 Is 

an extremely powerful macro assembler. 

just a few of Its features Include: 

• Fast assembly times 

• Word processor like editor 

• Conditional assemblies, 
Optional assembly to disk 

• Includes Sourceror, an easy to 
use disassembler that creates 
Merlin 64 source flies from 
binary data 

• Macro library of common 
operations 

• Cross Ref. utility program 

• 80 column display 
compatibility 

"This Is the best assembler I've seen for the Commodore 64. . . " 
Wm. Sanders /Assembly Language for Kids 

". . .an outsranding value. . .1 can't Imagine how it could 

be better.'' 
<t A O ^ C *fc c Peterson /AHOYI Magazine 




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DISK CAMERA 

Similar to Isepic (see review in 
October '85 Ahoy!), Snapshot 64 

backs up software by making a copy 
of your computer's memory and sav- 
ing it to disk with an autoboot so it 
can be easily loaded back in. Snap- 
shot's manufacturers claim, however, 
that it will make backups in about 
one-third the time of Isepic, without 
the need to determine parameters. 
Files created will work with the Epyx 
Fast Load cartridge, and MSD and 
4040 disk drives. Additionally, they 
will work without the Snapshot car- 
tridge being present. Price is $49.95 
plus S3.50 shipping. 

CSM Software. Inc., P.O. Box 563, 
Crown Point, IN 46307 (phone: 219- 
663-4335). 

GAME RELEASES 

The first person to solve the mys- 
tery of The Dolphin's Rune, newly 
translated to the C-64 byMindscape, 
will receive a one-week, expense-paid 
trip for two to Hawaii or the Turks 
and Caicos Islands in the West Indies. 
The game requires the player-dolphin 
to survive sharks and fishing nets and 
learn to swim through the game's 
"color currenLs." As his skills improve, 
the ocean lllls with dolphin sounds 
that can lead him to seabeds contain- 
ing fragments of an epic poem com- 
posed in a runic alphabet. Nine suc- 
cessive trips yield nine stanzas, which 
must be deciphered to reveal clues to 
a secret location somewhere on earth. 
This location provides a tenth stanza 
and the name of the location. The 
winning entrant will submit the nine 
deciphered stanzas, plus the tenth 
stanza and the name of the secret lo- 

8 AHOY! 




One of 6 SubLOGIC scenery disks. 
READER SERVICE NO. 269 




Disks cover entire western half of 
continental US, with detailed views. 

cation. More detailed rules are pack- 
aged with the program, which is 
priced at S29.95. . 

Also new from Mindscapc arc the 
following American releases of three 
graphic adventures for the C-64, 
priced at $29.95 each: 

Quake Minus One gives you 10 
hours to destroy four members of the 
Robot Liberation Front who have 
sabotaged an undersea power station. 
Fail, and the renegade robots will 
trigger an earthquake that will para- 
lyze the Western world. 

Shadowfire beams six superhero 
types aboard an alien spacecraft to 
rescue a kidnapped ambassador. A 
Game Changer disk available by mail 



for $9.95 allows players to change 
scenarios. 

Lards of Midnight, an adventure 
without text entry, requires players to 
traverse the Land of Midnight in 
search of Doomark the Witchking. 
More than 32.000 different land- 
scapes can appear during the course 
of play. 

Mindscapc Inc., 3444 Dundee 
Road. Northbrook. IL 60062 (phone: 
312-480-7667). 

Six different scenery disks have 
been released by SubLOGIC, ex- 
panding the potential flying environ- 
ment of flight simulation products 
like Flight Simulator II and Jet. The 
disks cover the entire western half of 
the continental U.S., each including 
the major airports, radio-nav aids, ci- 
ties, highways, rivers, and lakes lo- 
cated in a particular region. Sufficient 
detail is included on each disk for ei- 
ther visual or instrument cross-coun- 
try navigation. Price is $19.95 each 
or all six for $99.95. 

SubLOGIC Corporation, 713 Edge- 
brook Drive. Champaign, IL 61820 
(phone: 217-359-8482;" for orders 
800-637-4983 except IL. AK, HI). 

How do they do it? In an age of 
supposedly depressed software sales, 
SSI continues to release new war sim- 
ulations at an astonishing clip. Their 
only worry is that they'll run out of 
battles to recreate. New this month 
for the C-64: 

Ikatle ofAntietom ($49.95) simu- 
lates the 1862 skirmish along the An- 
tieUm Creek at Sharpsburg, PA. The 
ono- or two-player game can be 
played at introductory, intermediate, 
or advanced levels. 

Norway 1985 ($34.95), the fourth 




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entry in the "When Superpowers Col- 
lide" series, deals with the Soviet oc- 
cupation of Norway and NATO's 
counterattack. Infantry and mortar in- 
fantry ski troops are used in addition 
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415-964-1353), 

Activision adventure games Hack- 
er (see review this issue) and Mind- 
shadow will be released in versions 
tailored for the Amiga. And due from 
Activision for the 64: a game adap- 
tation of Vie Rocky Horror Show. 

Activision, Inc., 2350 Bayshore 
Frontage Road, Mountain View, CA 
94043 (phone: 415-960-0410). 

Spinnaker's UXB subsidiary will 
distribute British best seller Kung Fit: 
Vie Way of the Exploding Fist on this 
side of the Atlantic. The C-64 game 
for one or two players includes over 
15 different karate moves. Oriental 
background music, and realistic 
sound effects. Price is $29.95. 

UXB, division of Spinnaker Soft- 
ware Corp. , 1 Kendal] Square. Cam- 
bridge, MA 02139 (phone: 617- 
494-1200). 

The new Artworx Program Ex- 
change, or PX, line of software con- 
sists of 11 programs for the C-64, 
ranging from arcade games to mys- 
tery thrillers to family adventures. 
Price is $9.95 each. 

Artworx Software Company, Inc., 
150 North Main Street, Fairpon, NY 
14450 (phone: 800-828-6573 or 716- 
425-2833). 

A simulation of a robotics manu- 
facturing business over 72 operating 
months, American Dream ($119.95) 
puts you in the pinstripes of the CEO, 
with the goal of increasing market 
share and profitability. Seven depart- 
ment heads report to you on sales, 
manufacturing, engineering, produc- 
tion. R&D, materials management, 
quality assurance, and finance. Gen- 

10 AHOY! 



eral industry trend data is also made 
available in graphic form. Your de- 
cisions will be affected by GNP, in- 
flation, interest rates, competitors' 
prices, industry demand, labor rates, 
materials prices, and lead times. 

Blue Chip Software, 6740 Eton 
Avenue, Canoga Park, CA 91303 
(phone: 818-346-0730). 

BOOK RELEASES 

If you find 30 days too long to wait 
between installments of Commodore 
Roots, you can now learn assembly 
language from Mark Andrews at your 
own rate. Commodore 64/128 Assem- 
bly Language ($14,95), just released 
by Howard W. Sams & Co., is tar- 
geted for the reader with high inter- 
est but little experience in using the 
6502 's native tongue. In addition to 
beginner-level concepts, the volume 
provides a collection of assembly 
routines, plus intermediate material 
covering sprites and other graphics. 
Followers of Commodore Roots will 
find much of the book's content fa- 
miliar: designing a character set, 
writing joystick-controlled action 
games, drawing hi-res graphics, in- 
termixing BASIC with machine code, 
and more. 



%$0& 




Something of a computer industry 
guru himself after publishing 13 
books, Mark has spent much of the 
past two years researching his next 
volume— about gurus. So if you sec 
a mantra-generating routine in a fu- 
ture edition of Roots, you'll under- 
stand why. 

Also new from Sams is Vie Offi- 
cial Book for the Commodore 128 
Personal Computer ($12.95). which 
explains how to access hundreds of 



CP/M business programs, how to use 
the 128 as a 64 with existing software 
and peripherals, and the machine's 
enhanced abilities. 

Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc., 
4300 W, 62nd Street, Indianapolis, 
IN 46268 (phone: 317-298-5400). 

An updated version of Assembly 
Language for Kids (see review in Ap- 
ril '85 Ahoy!), with all the book's pro- 
grams reconfigured for programming 
in C-128 mode using the machine's 
built-in assembler, has been released 
by Microcomscribe. Also included 
are a C-128 memory map, new 
BASIC 7.0 tokens. C-128 sprite as- 
sembler with new addresses for sprite 
storage, information on switching 
memory banks, and instructions on 
using the monitor and mini-assem- 
bler. Despite the 29 additional pag- 
es, the book's price remains $14.95. 
Microcomscribe, 8982 SttmonCt., 
San Diego, CA 92129 (phone: 619- 
484-3884 or 578-4588). 

Available in a new edition with 
over 200 additional pages and much 
of its previous content updated, 77m? 
Complete Handbook of Personal 
Computer Communications ($14.95) 
tells users what to look for in a mo- 
dem and communications program. 
Ahoy! column- 
ist Mark An- 
drews authored 
one of Howard 
W, Sams' two 
new books on 
the C-128, 
covering as- 
sembly pro- 
gramming. 
READER 
SERVICE 
NO. 270 

how to utilize electronic mail and 
teleconferencing, what to consider 
when evaluating electronic banking 
systems, how to sell stocks, commod- 
ities, and securities online, and more. 
St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, NY 10010 (phone: 
212-674-5151). 

VfEST COAST SHOW 

Vie Commodore Show II, a trade 
exhibition featuring the latest hard- 




NEWS 



ware and software for Commodore 
machines from the C-64 to the Amiga, 
will be held on Saturday, February 
8 and Sunday, February 9 from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Cathedral Hill 
Hotel in San Francisco. Experts will 
speak on graphics, telecommunica- 
tions, business applications, and other 
subjects. Last year's show drew 5200 
attendees, many of whom stopped in 
at the Ahoy! booth. If you attend this 
year, we hope you'll do likewise. 

For information on booth space or 
advance ticket sales, contact the West 
Coast Commodore Association, P.O. 
Box 210638, San Francisco, CA 94121 
(phone: 415-982-1040). 

MICROLINE NLQ 

It's taken them only a couple of 
years longer than the rest of us, but 
printer manufacturers have finally 
realized that near letter quality print- 
ing is a highly desirable feature in a 
dot matrix printer. In next issue's Re- 
news section you'll read about a hard- 
ware enhancement for making the 
near letter quality printing of the Star 
SG-10/15 even nearer. And now a 
$24.95 PROM kit available from 
Okidata will endow the Micro! ine 182 
printer with near letter quality print- 
ing capability. Included is a PROM 
chip, installation instructions, and us- 
er's manual addendum. 

Also new from Okidata is the S229 
Cut Sheet Feeder 900 for the Micro- 
line 192 and wide-carriage 193 print- 
ers, capable of accepting up to 170 
sheets through the input hopper. 

Okidata, 532 Fellowship Road, Mt. 
Laurel. NJ 08054 (phone: 609- 
235-2600). 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Two for the 64 from Sunburst Com- 
munications: 

Trading Post ($59.00) encourages 
elementary and junior high school 
students to think ahead as they bar- 
ter general store items with the ob- 
ject of matching the selection ran- 
domly chosen by the computer. Ad- 
vanced levels require students to 
match up to eight objects, with in- 
creasingly complex trading rules. 

Hide W Sequence ($69.00) chal- 
lenges students to reconstruct scram- 




/. 




Graver's Adventures: name animals. Pals Around Town: create stories. 



HEADER SERVICE NO. 271 

bled literary passages that demon- 
strate four types of writing (narration, 
exposition, description, and persua- 
sion) and then use what they've 
learned about organization and se- 
quence to create their own stories. 
Sunburst Communications, 39 
Washington Ave., Pleasantville, NY 
10570 (phone: 800-431-1934 or 
914-769-5030). 
Two new C-64 releases from DLM : 
Create with GARFIELD! ($29.95) 
lets cat lovers design and print their 
own cartoons by choosing characters. 



READER SERVICE NO. 272 

setting scenes with backgrounds and 
props, and combining prewritten cap- 
tions or creating their own. The soft- 
ware includes suggestions for creat- 
ing name tags, place cards, invita- 
tions, notices, and signs. 

77?e Writing Adventure ($59.95) lets 
students write, edit, and print their 
own stories. Included are color 
graphics, suggested storylines, and 
prompting questions that aid in de- 
veloping ideas. 

DLM Inc., One DLM Park. Allen, 
TX 75002 (phone: 214-248-6300). 



BACKUP 
PROTECTED SOFTWARE 

FAST 

with COPY II 64/128 

From the team who brought you COPY II PLUS (Apple), COPY II PC 
(IBM) and COPY II MAC (Macintosh) comes a revolutionary new copy 
program for the Commodore 64 and 128 computers. 

• Copies most* protected software — automatically. 

• Copies even protected disks in just 2 mi tunes (single drive), 

• Copies even protected disks in just 1 minute (dual drive). 

• Maximum of four disk swaps on a single drive. 

• Includes last loader, 12 second format. 

Requires a Commodore 64 or 128 computer with one or two 1541 or 1571 drives. 



CENTRAL POINT 
Software, Inc. 

9700SWCapiwiHwy.,#106 
Ponland, OR 97219 



503/244-5782 

M-F, 8-5:30, W. Ohm Time 
CHECK, COD WELCOME 

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$39.95 



*Wc uixlatc G}py [9 M fcguhri'v u» handle new protections; itMl a* a reputed otaticj nuv updarr u am iime a i reduced price, 
The product it provided far tht purpose ef fnnbhtifi wn in makt arttnnt! ftpitl ftrft 
Reider Strvic* No. 201 



AHOY! II 



Why squint into a telescope on some 
freezing rooftop? CometWakii provides 
three programs for calculating and plot- 
ting the orbit of Hal ley's comet on- 
screen. The C-64 astronomer can also 
calculate the comet's position in the sky 
for any date, time, lattitude, and long- 
itude during its 1985/86 return. Also 
included is information on the physics 
of comets and how to observe and pho- 
tograph them. 

Zephyr Services, 306 S. Home- 
wood Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15208. 

Three C-64 releases from Free 
Spirit Software, Inc.: 

Technique! ($12.95) instructs the 
user in graphics, animation, sound, 
and music programming. A machine 
language music program, 12 songs, 
and an arcade game are included. 

BASlCally Simple ($20.00) explains 
C-64 BASIC commands and opera- 
tors in simple terms. Once the user 
has mastered BASIC, the disk serves 
as a reference guide. 

Italy ($15.00) teaches common Ital- 
ian phrases through a text game. 

Free Spirit Software, Inc., 5836 S. 






V- 



- 






Direct Ernie's Rubber Duckie to him. 
READER SERVICE NO. 273 

Mozart, Chicago, IL 60629 (phone: 
312-476-3640). 

CBS Software has trimmed its 
product line to 45 titles and cut pric- 
es on the following C-64 programs: 

Reduced to $14.95: Astro-Grover, 
Sesame Street Letter-Go- Round. Big 
Btnl's Funhou.se, Mister Rogers' Many 
Ways to Say I Love You, Dr. Seuss 
Fix-up the Mix-up Puzzler, Webster: 
The Word Game. 

Reduced lo $19.95: Richard Scar- 
ry's Best Electronic Word Book Ever!. 

Reduced to $24.95: Murder by the 
Dozen, Felony!, Adventure Master. 



TESTING 



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TESTMASTER-ONLY $35.00 

END TEST RE-TYPING FOREVER! 
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BUILD A BANK OF TEST ITEMS TO USE FROM 
YEAR TO YEAR 

UPPER / LOWER CASE AND COMPLETE 
EDITING FACILITIES 
PRODUCE TESTS FROM 1 TO 999 ITEMS 
PRODUCE ALTERNATE FORMS OF THE SAME TEST 
PRINTS ANSWER KEY AND MATCHING STUDENT 
RESPONSE SHEET FOR EACH FORM PRINTED 
FOR COMMODORE 64, 32K PET, APPLE It FAMILY, AND IBM 



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FREE TRIAL IN YOUR SCHOOL FOR 30 DAYS 



Please Add S2.00 Per Order For Postage and Handling 

SEND FOR OUR FLYER OF OTHER USEFUL SOFTWARE 

WRITTEN BY TEACHERS FOR TEACHERS 

MIDWEST SOFTWARE 

Box 214 Farmington, Ml 48024 
VISA/ MASTERCARD 

ORDER LINE 9:00 A.M. -5:00 P.M. 1-800-422-0095 

Michigan, and orders after 5:00 P.M. - (313) 477-0897 Reader service no. 132 




Released at $14.95 each are the fol- 
lowing C-64 games developed by the 
Children's Television Workshop for 
tykes aged four to six: 

Sesame Street Pals Around Town 
introduces children to the physical 
and social characteristics comprising 
a community as they explore a class- 
room, a schoolyard, a downtown 
street, Bert and Ernie's apartment, 
and Sesame Street. In each location, 
children create their own scenes and 
stories with music and graphics. 

Graver's Animal Adventures teach- 
es children to identify animals, pre- 
sented by the program in four envi- 
ron menLs: the African grasslands, the 
Atlantic Ocean, a North American 
lores! , and a barnyard. Children learn 
to associate animals and objects with 
their printed names and create their 
own nature scenes, 

Ernie's Big Splash requires children 
to help a bathing Ernie procure his 
Rubber Duckie by building a pathway 
from soap dish to tub An open fire hy- 
drant, a water slide, and a friendly al- 
ligator arc among the building pieces 
used in directing Duckie. 

CBS Software. One Fawcett Place, 
Greenwich, CT 06836 (phone: 203- 
622-2500). 

Smoky Mountain Software informs 
us that a number of bugs have been dis- 
covered in their Grade Manager HI 
program. Owners desiring the correct 
version should return their disks, en- 
closing $2.00 per disk to cover dupli- 
cating and shipping costs. {In other 
words, the user pays to ship the disk 
to the manufacturer, and then from the 
manufacturer back to him, plus the 
manufacturer's labor costs, to correct 
a mistake that is the manufacturer's 
fault. We'd like to sec General Motors 
try to get away with that one. ) 

Smoky Mountain Software, P.O. 
Box 1710, Brevard. NC 28712. 

ROLL OVER ESPERANTO 

THE Word Processor, compatible 
with CP/M-80 operating systems, is 
now available in Latin-based languag- 
es, enabling C-128 users to mix En- 
glish, French, German, Italian, Span- 
ish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, 
Dutch, and Portuguese in the same 
text. You may never need to, but aU 



12 AHOY! 



NEWS 



least you now know you can. 

Palantir Software. 12777 Jones 
Road, Suite 100. Houston, TX 77070 
(phone: 800-368-3797 or 713- 
955-8880). 

PRICE CORRECTION 

The price of Powerline Software's 
Energy Manager was incorrectly 
listed in October's Scuttlebutt. The 
correct price is $59.95. 

Powerline Software. P.O. Box 635, 
New Hartford, NY 13413 (phone: 315- 
735-0836). 

PORTFOLIO MANAGER 

Designed to be comprehensive yet 
easy to use, Personal Portfolio Man- 
ager ($39.95) allows C-64 owners to 
organize and manage their stocks and 
bonds. Capabilities include record- 
ing taxable or non-taxable dividends 
or interest income, reconciling each 
brokerage account cash balance with 
YTD transactions, producing reports 
for analysis to the user's specifications 
via a report generator, and entering 
quotes manually or automatically 
through DJNRS or Warner. The disk 
can run on one or two 1541"s or 1571's; 
a printer is recommended. 

Abacus Software. 2201 Kalamazoo 
S.E., P.O. Box 7211, Grand Rapids, 
MI 49510 (phone: 616-241-5510). 

ROBOTIC PROGRAMMING 

C-64 and C-128 owners can learn 
robotic programming while con- 
structing machine prototypes ranging 
from a computer plotter to dual axis 
robot arms with the Parsec Research 
Robotic Programming Kit. The 240- 
piece hardware set comes complete 
with interface and all necessary at- 
tachments, including motors, gears, 
lamps, sensors, switches, and elec- 
tromagnetic; components are de- 
signed to allow devices to repeat op- 
erations with +-lmm tolerance. 

The software is derived from Par- 
sees Supcrfonh (sec review in this is- 
sue), a language which meets indus- 
trial standards: everything users learn 
is transferable to computer control 
systems such as laboratories and au- 
tomated assembly lines. 

Ten instruction models are includ- 
ed in the manual, but the possible 



configurations are limitless. 

Parsec Research, 41805 Albrae 
Street. Fremont, CA 94538 (phone: 
800-633-6335; in CA 415-651-3160). 

SPIKE BLOK 

The Spike Blok plugs into an exist- 
ing twin outlet receptacle and converts 
it into six outlets with full noise and 
spike suppression. Two indicator lights 
show that power is present and that 
protection circuit ry is working. 

Tripp Lite, Chicago, IL 60610 
(phone: 312-329-1777). 

TELECOM NEWS 

CompuServe has announced the 
availability of 2400 baud dial-up ac- 
cess in numerous cities across the 
United States. Rate for 2400 baud ac- 
cess is ,$19.00 per hour during stan- 
dard hours and $22.50 during prime 
service hours. 

CompuScj-vc, 5000 Arlington Cen- 
tre Blvd., P.O. Box 20212, Columbus, 
OH 43220 (phone: 614-457-8600). 

Huttonline, which enables E.F. Hut- 
ton clients to access the firm's compu- 




Spike Blok suppresses noise, spikes. 
READER SERVICE NO. 274 

ters for personal account data and in- 
vestment information, has expanded its 
services and restructured its fees. Now 
available are: Moody's Investor's Ser- 
vice (financial information on the 3600 
largest public corporations in the US), 
Expanded Market Watch {monitor 
quotes on 20 issues, follow up to 800 
issues automatically), Market Flash 
(snapshot of activity on the eight major 



Super Graphix jr. 




High Performance .... Low Cost!!! 

NOW — CORRESPONDENCE QUALITY and GRAPHICS are available for the 
Commodore Computers in one cost effective interface with the following 
features: 



* Micro Buffer 

* Graphics/Normal Quality Printing 

* Correspondence Quality 

* 8 Active Switches with Changes 
Constantly Monitored 

* 10 Printing Modes 

* Centronics Compatible 

Suggested list $59.95 • 



* Supports All Major Printers 

* 100% Compatible wilh Software 
for 1525 

* User's Manual with Software 
Examples 

* Compact Design Plugs Directly 
into Printer 

Includes Lifetime Warranty 



S^ £=!==, Inc. / 3010 Arnold Rd. / Sallna, KS 67401 / 913-827-0685 



Reader Service No. 133 



J 



AHOY! 13 



NEWS 



siniiii I 

RACE ANALYSIS SYSTEMS 

Professional Harness, Thoroughbred and 

Greyhound Race Analyzers with unparalleled 
features: 

•k Five minutes worth of typing replaces over 
two hours of tedious hand (ailculations 
needed per race (or this unique handi- 
capping system. 

♦ Momintj Line odds are not used, giving the 
bettor a source of information independent 
from the morning line. 

"k Cross references info from up to twenty 
races and generates bet suggestions in- 
cluding best win, qui n el I a, p erf a eta, axac- 
Ira, trifecta and trifecta box 

* Ratings can be viewed on screen, printed 
by printer or saved on diskette fur future 
evaluation, 

Available on diskette for the Commodore 64 

3-PACK (all 3 Analy/ers) . . . S49.95 

2-PACK (any 2 Analyzers) . . . $39.95 

1-PACK (any I Analyzer} . . . 524,95 

DEMO (refundable fee) ... S10.00 

* 30 Day Money Back Guarantee 

* Prices Include Shipping 

* PA Residents Add 6% Sales Tax 

* All Orders Shipped Same Day 

ALSOFT 
305 Large Avenue * C'airton. PA 1 5025 

Phono (412)233-4659 ■■■!! 
VISA' 
Render Service No. 123 \ i 

1 i 




Startext have joined the list of online 
information services offering the 
electronic edition of the Academic 
American Encyclopedia, For infor- 
mation on QuantumLink call 703- 
448-8700; on Startext call 817- 
390-7892; and on the encyclopedia 
contact Grolier Electronic Publishing, 
Inc., 95 Madison Ave., New York, 
NY 10016 (phone: 212-696-9750). 

PRINTER STANDS 

Why dwell on the fact that compu- 
ters aren't selling anymore? At Ahoy! 
we prefer to accentuate the positive. 
With two models announced in last 
month's Scuttlebutt and two models de- 
scribed below, the printer stand mar- 
ket is apparently at an all-time high. 

Orange Micro's 80 Column Print- 
er Stand ($29.95), built of smoked 
plexiglass, is designed to hold most 
narrow carriage printers plus paper. 
Rubber feet protect the table surface. 

Orange Micro Inc., 1400 N. Lake- 
view Ave., Anaheim, CA 92807 
(phone: 714-779-2772). 

The MicroFold Printer Stand 
comes in sizes for 80 column 
($44.95) and 132 column ($49.95) 
printers. The stand will feed and re- 



Orange Mic- 
ro's 80-Col- 
umn Printer 
Stand stores 
paper supply 
under the 
printer. Rub- 
ber feet add 
stability. 
READER 
SERVICE 
NO. 275 



indexes), and Rates & Trends (currency 
exchange rates, metal prices, econom- 
ic indicator announcements, yields for 
government securities, and more). 

New rates are 25 cents per minute 
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m, weekdays and 
10 cents per minute at other times, 

E.E Hutton & Company Inc.. One 
Battery Park Plaza, New York, NY 
10004 (phone: 212-742-3317). 

The QuantumLink Personal Com- 
puter Network and Fort Worth-based 

14 AHOY! 



fold printer paper via wire formed 
trays in an area no wider than the 
printer. 

Microcomputer Accessories, Inc., 
P.O. Box 3725, Culver City, CA 90231 
(phone; 213-641-1800). 

PROGRAMS OF CHANCE 

If Lucky Lottery (July '85 Ahoy!) 
hasn't made you a millionaire yet, 
Ridge Services offers Lotto Picker 
($29.95), a C-64 translation of the 



program previously available in TI99/ 
4A and IBM formats. The program 
will generate a series of random plays 
for all Lotto- type games, duplicating 
the process used by lottery commis- 
sions, thereby eliminating bias from 
the selections. North America's most 
popular lotto games are programmed 
in, including the new California Lot- 
ten/ and revised New York and Can- 
ada games. 

Also newly available in C-64 for- 
mat, Pro Football Analyst ($35.00) 
promises to enable the user to select 
NFL and USFL winners against the 
point spread by spending only five 
minutes per week analyzing a com- 
plete slate of games. Statistical input 
required can be obtained from any lo- 
cal newspaper. 

Ridge Services, 170 Broadway, 
Su.tc 201, New York, NY 10038 
(phone: 718-833-6335). 

HAM RADIO PACKAGE 

Two new releases from AC3L Soft- 
ware: 

While it will not save files, the 
One-Shot word processor is easy to 
use and suitable for letters and other 
simple, one-time-only applications. 

Designed as an aid for ham radio 
enthusiasts, Band/Ayde includes the 
One-Shot word processor described 
above, a scratch pad for taking notes 
while listening or operating, clock 
functions (including audio and vis- 
ual alarms), and pitch, volume, and 
color selection. 

Both available on tape or disk for the 
-C-64-; $14.95 each (PA residents add 
6% sales tax). Tape versions will be 
discontinued January 1. This applies 
also to AC3L's Internationa! Morse 
CikIc Trainer and ESP Tester programs. 

AC3L Software, P.O. Box 7, New 
Deny, PA 15671. 

GAME DESIGN CONTEST 

A cash award of $5000 and a trip 
to Activision's headquarters in Cali- 
fornia will be awarded to the grand 
prize winner of Activision's Game- 
Maker Design Contest. A second 
prize of $2500 and a third prize of 
S1000 will also be awarded. 

Contest rules arc packaged with 



DRIVE UNITS 



kJUNHBW 



OPJLY! 



ffiMMFlltt 



POLITE 



~ ' "■' -- HHMW^tl 







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Who needs this? 

When you can solve disk drive alignment problems 
in 60 minutes with the CSM program. \ 



Disk drive alignment problems? 
Drive out of alignment again? 
Tired of waiting two weeks or 
more to get your drive fixed?? 

WE HAVE THE ANSWER I I 

With the 1541 DISK DRIVE ALIGNMENT 
PROGRAM you can align the drive yourself 
in an hour or so, Not only that, you can do 
it at home ANO no special equipment is 
required. Anyone with average mechanical 
skills can do it! ! 



Read What Computers Gazette 
had to say. (Oct., 1984) 

". . . with 1541 Disk Drive Alignment from 
CSM Software, you can fix it [the disk 
drive] yourself in an hour or so and the 
program wit! pay for itself the first time 
you use it. ..No technical expertise Is re- 
quired to accomplish the alignment pro- 
cedures, and the manual accompanying 
the program thoroughly describes the 
procedures." 



WHY BE AT THE MERCY OF 
REPAIR SHOPS? 

INSTRUCTIONS INCLUDED FOR 
"THE FIX"— It may just keep your 
drive from ever going out of align- 
ment again. 



1541 DISK DRIVE ALIGNMENT 

PROGRAM VERSION 2.0 

$44.95 plus shipping 



PROGRAM PROTECTION MANUAL 
FOR THE C-64 VOLUME II 

Not just a third edition — a new and up-lo-date 
manual covering the latest advances in pro- 
gram protection. Over 275 pages of valuable In- 
formation. Topics Include: 

• ENCRYPTION AND DECRYPTION 
■ UNDOCUMENTED OPCODES 

• GCR RECORDING 

• CUSTOM DOS ROUTINES 

• CARTRIDGES AND EPROMS 

' PROTECTING YOUR OWN SOFTWARE 

• TIPS FROM EXPERTS ON 

PROTECTION. BACKUP & MORE 

• DISK INCLUDED 

$34.95 plus shipping 

PROGRAM PROTECTION MANUAL 
FOR THE C-64 VOLUME I 

• A MUST FOR BEGINNERS 

• THE PERFECT INTRODUCTION 

TO PROGRAM PROTECTION 

• DISK INCLUDED 

$29.95 plus shipping 

f ' is a registered trademark of Commodore 



: 


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2 


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HUMERIC KEYPAD 

FOR VIC and C-64 

NO SOFTWARE 

REQUIRED 

100% COMPATIBLE 

WITH ALL SOFTWARE 

MORE FUNCTIONS THAN 

KEYPADS COSTING (79.95 

$64.95 plus shipping 
CARTRIDGE BACKER 

PACKAGE INCLUDES: 

1. EXPANSION BOARD, PROGRAM DISK 
AND USER'S MANUAL 

2. CARTRIDGE BACKER software to back-up 
99% of the most popular C-64 cartridges 
to dish. 

3. SOFTWARE TO BACK UP MANY DISK 
PROGRAMS. 

A. SOLD FOR ARCHIVAL USE ONLY!! 

$54.95 plus shipping 

Business Machines, Inc. 



NEW PRODUCT 

* SNAPSHOT 64™ * 

SNAPSHOT 64 is a new backup utility program 
that literally takes a 'SNAPSHOT' of your com- 
puter's memory. This snapshot is tfien saved to 
disk with an autoboot so that it may be easily 
loaded back in. It does all this automatically 
and easily. 

• EASY TO USE. TAKES ONLY 3-5 MINUTES 

• BACKS UP MANY MORE PROGRAMS THAN 
SIMILAR UTILITIES 

• SOLD FOR ARCHIVAL PURPOSES ONLY 
' EXCLUSIVE FEATURE ■ ALLOWS YOU TO 

STOP MOST PROGRAMS AT ANY POINT, 
EXAMINE THE COMPUTER'S MEMORY, AND 
THEN RESTART THE PROGRAM. THIS IS A 
VERY VALUABLE FEATURE FOR THE 
HACKER!! 

$49.95 plus shipping 



VISA AND MASTERCARD ACCEPTED 

Shipping S3 50 per item in U.S.; foreign orders extra 



Available through your local software dealer or call: 

CSM SOFTWARE, INC. 

POST OFFICE BOX 563, CROWN POINT IN. 46307, PHONE (219) 663-4335 




Reader Service No. 266 




"COLOR" 
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NEWS 



Reader Service Nn, 1S8 



Garry Kitchen's GameMaker: Tlie 
Computer Game Design Kii, which 
allows C-64 owners to design games 
without programming knowledge. 
Contestants must send their work on 
disk, along with an official entry 
form, to Activision, whose panel of 
experts will judge the games on the 
basis of creativity, originality, game- 
play, graphics, music, and effects. 

Activision, Inc., 2350 Bayshorc 
Frontage Road, Mountain View, CA 
94043 (phone: 415 -960-0410). 

NET WORTH ENHANCEMENT 

Scarborough Systems has upgrad- 
ed its home financial management 
program, Your Personal Net Worth, 
to provide clearer report formatting 
and the ability to change the name of 
the data disk from the maintenance 
menu. Users desiring the upgrade can 
obtain it for $10.00. 

Scarborough Systems, 55 South 
Broadway, Tarry town, NY 10591 
(phone: 914-332-4545). 

$4.99 SOFTWARE 

BCI Software has released the first 
12 titles in what is intended to be a 
comprehensive line of C-64 software 
available at $4.99 per disk. These in- 
clude Inventory Control, Typing Tu- 
tor, Business Letters (50 prewritten 
letters covering a variety of uses), 
Word Processor, Data Base, and as- 
sorted educational programs. Already 
available are several programs for 
$9.99 each, including HydlXVC, an ad- 
venture game offering a $1000 prize. 
Coming is a $29.95 spreadsheet. 

BCI Software, P.O. Box 730, Ring- 
wood, NJ 07456 (phone: 201- 
835-7300). 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
PROGRAMS 

Gessler Educational Software, pub- 
lisher of more than 200 foreign lan- 
guage software titles, has re-released 
a number of C-64 programs from dif- 
ferent manufacturers in French, 
Spanish, and German versions. In- 
cluded are Spinnaker's Kids on Keys, 
Kidwriter, Snooper Troops, and In 
Search of the Most Amazing Tlting, 
and Davidson's Word Attack. 

Gessler Educational Software, 900 



Broadway, New York, NY 10003 
(phone: 212-673-3113). 

I. THE QUARRY 

You're living on Borrowed Time as 
Sam Harlow, star of Activision's new 
illustrated text adventure, as you race 
to prevent your own murder. In less 
than a day, you must track down and 
grill a number of suspects found in 
your case files, all the while keep- 
ing an eye over your shoulder. Add- 
ing to the tension is the fact that you 
can control only Sam's actions; all 
other characters act in sudden, un- 
expected ways. The program includes 
several interactive features such as 
pull-down windows, point and press 
oplions, and "most used command" 
menus. For the C-64 and C-128; scon 
for the Amiga. Price is $29.95. 

Activision, Inc., 2350 Bayshore 
Frontage Road, Mountain View, CA 
94043 (phone: 415-960-0410). 



Bataille 

de 

Mots 




C-64 software in foreign languages. 
READER SERVICE NO. 137 



W AHOY! 



The Japanese have a word for it. 





HHIll) 



You are the star of a Martial Arts movie so real, 
you'll feel it like a kick in the ribs. 



KARATEKA, you have learned well 
the disciplines of karate. , .but now it 
is time to put your skills to the test. 
Your village has been ransacked, 
your friends and family scattered to 
the winds, your bride-to-be, Princess 
Mariko, kidnapped and cruelly 
imprisoned by the evil warlord 
Akuma. If you ever hope to see her 
again, Karateka, you know what you 
must do. 

Scale the mighty cliffs that lead 
to Akuma's fortress. There, you 
will en- 
counter 
the first 
of many 
palace 
guards. 
Kick! 
Thrust! 





will face 



Parry! At every turn you .. 

yet another warrior, each stronger 



than the last. 

Finally, Karateka, you will come 
face-to-face with Akuma himself. 
Here your fate will be decided. Either 
eternal happiness or instant death. 
THE MAKING OF KARATEKA. 

"Karateka" 
designer 
Jordan 
Mechner 
is a karate 
enthusiast 
and a 
stickler 

for realism. He used film clips of 
karate masters as a guide for the 
moves used in the game. 

The carefully detailed, animated 
figures perform all the moves of real 
martial arts combat with stunning 
realism. 

Beautiful scrolling hi-res back- 
grounds, an intricate story line and 

Broderbund 



fast-paced karate action make 
"Karateka" a great way to get 
your kicks. 



kaRAteka 

■A 




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DrUdi-rbund products. pleas,- """■ "" ■" " p " ul """"• S ' ,n I*-' 1 -"' 1 - California OJ.903-J101. Apple, Commodore and Atari are neutered trademarks of Apple Computer, 
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Reader Service No. 104 









Some Historic Breakthroughs 
Dont Take As Much Explaining 

As CompuServe. 




But then, some historic 
breakthroughs could only 
take you from the cave to 
the tar pits and back again. 

CompuServe, on the other hand, 
makes a considerably more civilized 
contribution to your life. 

It turns that marvel of the 20th 
century, the personal computer, into 
something useful. 

Unlike most personal 
computer products you 
read about, CompuServe 
is an information service. 
It isn't software. It isn't 
hardware. And you don't even have 
to know a thing about programming 
to use it. You subscribe to CompuServe 
— and 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 
it puts a universe of information, 
entertainment and communications 
right at your fingertips. 

A few of the hundreds 
of things you can do with 
CompuServe. 

COMMUNICATE 

EasyPlex™ Electronic Mail lets even 
beginners compose, edit, send and 
file messages the first time they get 
online. It puts friends, relatives and 



business associates — anywhere in 
the country — in constant, conven- 
ient touch. 




CB Simulator features 

72 channels for "talking" 

with thousands of other 

enthusiastic subscribers 

throughout the country 

and Canada. The chatter 

is frequently hilarious, the "handles" 

unforgettable, and the friendships 

hard and fast. 

More lhan 100 Forums welcome 
UJ your participation in "discussions" 
on all sorts of topics. There are 
Forums for computer owners, 
gourmet cooks, veterinarians, pilots, 
golfers, musicians, you name it! Also, 
Electronic Conferencing lets busi- 
nesses put heads together without 
anyone having to leave the shop. 

Bulletin Boards let you "post" 
messages where thousands will see 
them. You can use our National 
Bulletin Board or the specialized 
Bulletin Boards found in just about 
every Forum. 

HAVE FUN 

Our full range of games includes 
"You Guessed It!", the first online 
TV-style game show you play for real 
prizes; and Mega Wars III, offering the 



ultimate in interactive excitement. 
And there are board, parlor, sports 
and educational games to play alone 

or against other subscribers 

throughout the country. 

Movie Reviews keep that big 

night at the movies from being a 

five star mistake. 

SHOP 

THE ELECTRONIC MALE" gives 
you convenient, 24-hour-a-day, 
7-day-a-week shopping for name 
Drand goods and services at discount 
prices from nationally known stores 
and businesses. 

SAVE ON TRIPS 

Travelshopper sM 

lets you scan flight 
availabilities (on 
virtually any 
I airline — worid- 
| wide), find airfare 
bargains and order 
tickets right on your computer. 

Worldwide Exchange sets you up 
with the perfectyacht, condo, villa, 
or whatever it takes to make your next 
vacation a vacation. 

A to Z Travel/News Service 

provides the latest travel news plus 
complete information on over 20,000 
hotels worldwide. 





MAKE PHI BETA KAPPA 

Grolier's Academic American 
Encyclopedia's Electronic Edition 

delivers a complete set of encyclope- 
dias right to your living 
room just in time for 
today's homework. It's 
continuously updated . . . 
and doesn't take an inch 
of extra shelf space. 
The College Board, operated by the 
College Entrance Examination 
Board, gives tips on preparing for the 
SAT, choosing a college and getting 
financial aid. 

KEEP HEALTHY 

Healthnet will never replace a real, 
live doctor — but it is an excellent and 
readily available source of health and 
medical information for the public. 
Human Sexuality gives the civiliza- 
tion that put a man on the moon an 
intelligent alternative to the daily 
"Advice to the Lovelorn" columns. 
Hundreds turn to it for real answers. 

BE INFORMED 

All the latest news is at your 
fingertips. Sources include the AP 
news wire (covering all 50 states plus 
national news), the 
Washington Post, 
USA TODAY Update, 
specialized business 
and trade publica- 
tions and more. You 
can find out instantly what Congress 
did yesterday; who finally won the 
game; and what's happening back in 
Oskaloosa with the touch of a button. 
And our electronic clipping service 
lets you tell us what to watch for. We'll 
electronically find, clip and file news 
for you. . .to read whenever you'd like. 

INVEST WISELY 

Comprehensive investment help 

just might tell you more about the 
stock you're looking at 
than the company's 
Chairman of the Board 
knows. (Don't know who 
he is? Chances are, we 
can fill you in on that, 
too.) CompuServe gives you com- 
plete statistics on over 10,000 NYSE, 
AM EX and OTC securities. Historic 
trading statistics on over 50,000 




stocks, bonds, funds, issues and 
options. Five years of daily com- 
modity quotes. Standard & Poor's. 
Value Line. And more than a dozen 
other investment tools. 

Site II facilitates business 
decisions by providing you 
with demographic and sales 
potential information by state, 
county and zip code for the 
entire country. 
National and Canadian business 
wires provide continuously updated 
news and press releases on hundreds 
of companies worldwide. 

GET SPECIALIZED 
INFORMATION 

Pilots get personalized flight plans, 
weather briefings, weather and radar 
maps, newsletters, etc. 
Entrepreneurs use CompuServe 
too for complete step-by-step guide- 
lines on how to incorporate the IBMs 
of tomorrow. 

Lawyers, doctors, engineers, mil- 
itary veterans and businessmen 
of all types use similar specialized 
CompuServe resources pertinent to 
their unique needs. 




And now for the 
pleasant surprise. 

Although CompuServe makes the 
most of any computer, it's a remark- 
able value. With CompuServe, you 
get low start-up costs, low usage 
charges and local phone-call access 
in most major metropolitan areas. 

Here's exactly how 
to use CompuServe. 

First, relax. 

There are no advanced computer 
skills required. —Xrifs' — 

In fact, if you know [ 
how to buy breakfast, 
you already have the 
know-howyou'll need L 
to access any subject 

in our system. That's because it's 
'*menu-driven;' so beginners can 
simply read the menus (lists of 
options) that appear on their 
screens and then type in their 
selections. 
Experts can skip the menus and 
just type in "GO" followed by the 
abbreviation for whatever topic 
they're after. 

Reader Sarvlci No. 264 



In case you ever get lost or con- 
fused, just type in "H" for help, and 
we'll immediately cut in with instruc- 
tions that should save the day. 

Besides, you can either ask ques- 
tions online through our Feedback 
service or phone our Customer 
Service Department. 

How to subscribe. 

To access CompuServe, you'll 
need a CompuServe Subscription 
Kit, a computer, a modem to connect 
your computer to your phone, and 
in some cases, easy-to-use com- 
munications software. (Check the 
information that 
comes with your 
modem.) 

With your Sub- 
scription Kit, you'll 
receive: 

■ a $25 usage credit. 

■ a complete hardcover Users Guide. 

■ your own exclusive user ID 
number and preliminary password. 

■ a subscription to CompuServe's 
monthly magazine, Online Today. 

Call 800-848-8199 (in Ohio, 
614-457-0802) to order your Sub- 
scription Kit or to receive more 
information. Or mail this coupon. 

Kits are also available in computer 
stores, electronic equipment outlets 
and household catalogs. You can also 
subscribe with materials you'll find 
packed right in with many com- 
puters and moderns sold today 

' Q Please send me additional in lwm.il km. 
I CJ Pleaie seminal CompuServe Subscription Kit 
| O 1 am enclosing my check for $39.95. plus S2.50 
handling. (Add sales lux ifdetivemi in Ohio.) 

I 





Please mate check payable to CompuServe 
Information Services, Inc. 

□ Charge this to my VlSAWasterCard 

# 



I Qty„ 
I State. 

I 



. Zip _ 



MAIL TO: 



CompuServe 



Customer Service Ordering Oepl. 



PRIZ01 



P0.8e*L-477 
I Columbus, Ohio 43260 

An H*H Block Cfl<T>"ny 

EoqyPtov and ELECTRONIC MALL *<o trademaptia ol CompuServe. 

Incorpofitad Trav*t*noppnr US ■ SflfwCe rcwk ot TVfA 



PUPIERT REPORT 

11 1 il 



the magical Link 




FILE COMMUNICATION ON THE 
RS-232 INTERFACE 

BY DALE RUPERT 



There is something magical about connecting 
two computers with some strands of wire and 
watching them share information. Last month 
we developed hardware and software to pass 
data in serial form back and forth between Commodore 
and IBM computers. This month we will create software 
so that two computers can exchange programs and se- 
quential files over the RS-232 serial link. 

All of the programs this month are written for the Com- 
modore computers (VIC 20 and C-64). It should not be 
difficult to modify these programs for cither computers. 
If you don't have two computers, get together with a friend. 
If you have no interest in exploring RS-232 communica- 
tions, keep reading anyway. You may find this month's 
discussions of the keyboard buffer and sequential file 
handling useful for other applications as well. 

20 AHOY! 



We saw in last month's Rupert Report that it takes only 
three wires and two connectors to join the RS-232 ports 
of two Commodore computers. The Sout signal (pin M) 
of each Commodore (C-64 or VIC 20) goes to the Sin 
signal (pins B and C) of the other Commodore, Also the 
two grounds (pin N) tire tied together. 

It is very straightforward to establish an RS-232 com- 
munications channel. The channel is given a file number 
from 1 to 127 by means of an OPEN statement such as this: 

OPEN 2,2/J,CHR${8)+CHR$(0) 

The first 2 is the file number. The next two numbers are 
always 2 and for RS-232 communications. 

The value in the first CHRS function specifics the baud 
rate, which is the speed of transmission. The first CHRS 



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Render Service No. 108 



Simulator II 





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Reidor S»rvle« No. 256 



argument is also used for indicating the number of stop 
bits and the number of data bits in each transmitted char- 
acter. The CHR$(8) means "1 stop bit, 8 data bits, and 
1200 bits per second baud rate." Refer to last months ar- 
ticle or the RS-232 Interface Description near the back 
of the Programmer's Reference Guide for the details. If 
you have trouble using 1200 baud, you might replace the 
8 with a 6 in order to communicate at 300 baud. If your 
programs still don't work at 300 baud, better check the 
wires and connectors. 

The second CHRS function in the OPEN statement 
is optional. It is used for specifying the parity, the du- 
plex mode, and the type of hardware handshaking lines 
being used. The value gives the same results as sim- 
ply omitting the CHRS. The default values implied by 
CHR$(0) are "no parity, full duplex, and 3-line hand- 
shaking." Parity is a means of performing error-check- 
ing on the received data, although it is not implemented 
in BASIC. Full duplex mode means that the Commodore 
will both transmit and receive data. The alternative to 
the 3-line (3-wire) connection that we are using is X- 
line handshaking, which is not implemented in BASIC. 

Once the RS-232 channel has been opened, data is trans- 
mitted with the PRINT* or the CMD statements. Received 
data is read from the input buffer with the GET# statement. 

WIRED PROGRAMS 

BASIC programs are stored on tape or disk in a token- 
ized or compressed format. Each of the BASIC keywords 
is represented with a single byte value. It is possible to 
read such a program file and transmit it byte by byte to 
another computer. Unless that other computer is a Com- 
modore, it would not be able to make much sense out 
of the tokenized program. To make our RS-232 programs 
more general, we will assume that all files to be trans- 
mitted or received are standard ASCII files. For exam- 
ple, a PRINT statement in a BASIC program will be 
transmitted as five ASCII characters rather than one to- 
kenized code. 

It is very easy for the Commodore computers to trans- 
mit programs in ASCII format. The CMD and LIST 
statements work nicely as the ASCII Transmitter program 
on page 119 shows. 

If you want to send the BASIC program in memory 
to another computer over the RS-232 interface, just add 
the two lines of the ASCII Transmitter program and type 
RUN. You may use these lines in the direct mode also 
(that is, enter each one without line numbers). 

Line 8 opens the RS-232 channel. The CMD state- 
ment redirects data which would normally go to the screen 
out to logical file number 2 instead. That logical file is 
the RS-232 channel. So now when the program is listed, 
the listing goes to the RS-232 output buffer for trans- 
mission. The listing is sent to the buffer in ASCII format. 

The LIST command brings the computer back to com- 
mand mode rather than to the next line of the program. 
Therefore to terminate the file and properly close the 
channel, type RUN 9 to execute line 9. Line 9 adds a 



CHRS(26) to the end of the transmitted program file. This 
is used by the receiver program which we will look at 
next. The PRINT#2 sends an "unlisten" to the RS-232 
channel before it is closed. 

The ASCII Transmitter program assumes that your pro- 
gram in memory docs not use line numbers less than 12 
(although you may omit the REMarks and use line num- 
bers and 1). If the program in memory to be transmitted 
uses line numbers and 1, you may simply type the two 
program lines from /iSCH Transmitter in direct mode with- 
out line numbers. You might use LIST 13- instead of sim- 
ply LIST if you don't want to transmit this ASCII Trans- 
mitter program along with your other program. 

QUICK, BRING THE BIT BUCKET! 

If you ran the ASCII Transmitter program without an- 
other computer attached to your RS-232 port, all of the 
transmitted data bits fell into the proverbial bit bucket 
behind your computer. To capture those bits and use 
them, you should have a second computer programmed 
and ready to receive that data as it is sent. 

Using and storing a program which has been received 
in ASCII format is quite a bit more difficult than send- 
ing the program. In fact we are going to resort to down- 
right trickery! We will use a strategy suggested by Dr. 
Gerald Neufeld in his latest book, 1541 User's Guide 
(Datamost, 1984). His book contains a wealth of infor- 



HAVING TROUBLE REMEMBERING ALL THE 
COMMANDS FOR YOUR PROGRAMS?? 

YOU NEED 

LEROY'S CHEATSHEET 



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AHOY! 23 



mation on the 1541 disk drive and the various types of 
files available. (His clever and lucid disk drive alignment 
procedure alone was worth the price of the book for me.) 

The RS-232 Receiver program on page 119 reads the 
incoming ASCII program data from the RS-232 input 
buffer character by character in lines 30120 through 30170. 
When a carriage return is found, the entire line is printed 
at the top of the screen by line 30070. "RUN 30000" is 
printed on the next line of the screen by line 30080. Line 
30090 is where the funny business begins. 

Characters typed from the keyboard go into a buffer 
starting at memory location 631, A count of how many 
characters arc waiting in the buffer is stored in memory 
location 198. When the computer is ready to respond to 
keyboard input, it reads the character count and proceeds 
to remove the characters from the buffer to send them 
to the screen. 

While the program is executing, the computer is not 
interested in reading any keyboard input {since the pro- 
gram does not contain any GET or INPUT statements). 
In the meantime, the program in line 30090 has surrep- 
titiously put three characters into the keyboard buffer and 
stored and proper count in location 198. 

After line 30KX) is executed, the program has ended. 
The computer then checks the keyboard buffer to see if 
anything has been typed yet. Sure enough, it finds the 
three characters we POKEd and treats them as though 



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Reader Service No. 295 



we had typed them. The first character (19) corresponds 
to the <HOME> key. You will find the ASCII and 
CHRS code numbers in an appendix at the back of your 
User's Manual or Programmer's Reference Guide. 

Now the cursor is at the upper left corner of the screen. 
Remember that the first program line received from the 
RS-232 port is printed on the first line or two of the 
screen. The next character in the keyboard buffer is 13, 
meaning < RETURN > . Since the computer is operating 
in direct mode, the < RETURN > key stores the first 
received program tine (line number and all) into memory, 
exactly as if we had typed the line ourselves and pressed 
< RETURN >. 

Now the cursor is al the beginning of the next line on 
the screen, which says RUN 30000. The computer finds 
one more character in the keyboard buffer. Again it is 
a character 13, meaning < RETURN > . The command 
RUN 30000 is executed, starting the whole process again. 

Thus each line of the received program is printed on 
the screen and entered just as if we had typed and en- 
tered each line from the keyboard. All of the received 
program lines are added to the RS-232 Receiver program. 
We are assuming that all of the received program line 
numbers are less than 30000 and that all program lines 
arc 79 characters or less in length. Program lines longer 
than 79 characters arc chopped off. You must edit them 
later if necessary. 

The last program line received is followed by the 
CHRS(26) (end of fib character) which is sent by the 
ASCI! Transmitter program. When that character is rec- 
ognized, the RS-232 channel is closed by line 30140. 
Then, as a convenience, line numbers 30000 through 
30200 are printed in a column on the screen. You may 
delete these lines of the RS-232 Receiver program simply 
by pressing the < RETURN > key 21 times. Now you 
are left with only the nxeived program in memory which 
you may either run or save. 

Now to briefly review the process, 

1 . Load the RS-232 Receiver program into computer 
A and run it. 

2. Load the program to be transmitted into computer 
B and then add lines 8 and 9 from the ASCII Transmit- 
ter program to it. 

3. Enter RUN 8 on computer B. 

4. When all lines have been received by computer A, 
enter RUN 9 on computer B to close the channel. 

5. Delete the lines of the RS-232 Receiver program in 
computer A by pressing < RETURN > 21 times. 

6. If necessary, edit any lines of the received program 
in computer A originally longer than 79 characters. 

7. Save and/or run the program in computer A. 
No doubt some of you may be wondering why we would 

go to all this trouble when we could simply load the program 
from computer B's disk or tape into computer A. You are 
absolutely correct if both computers have compatible tape 
or disk formats (such as two Commodores). 

The reason for using the RS-232 ASCII format is that 
it is a universal way to transport information. The Com- 



24 AHOY! 




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Reader Service No. 278 



modore and IBM disk formats are totally incompatible, 
yet the two machines readily exchange programs in ASCII 
format. (Of course the two forms of BASIC are not to- 
tally compatible, but that is another story. Most gener- 
al-purpose commands run equally well on both machines.) 

THE FINAL LINK 

Some computers do not have the convenience of the 
CMD command to send fdes in ASCII format to the RS- 
232 output buffer. It is useful for computers to be able 
to communicate sequential data files as well as programs. 
Therefore we will write a program to read and transmit 
sequential disk fdes from one computer. Wc will devel- 
op another program to receive these files and write them 
to the screen, a printer, or a disk. 

The Sequential Transmitter program on page 119 is 
very straightforward. After opening the RS-232 channel, 
the program asks for the name of the file to be transmit- 
ted. Line 130 opens that disk file. Lines 140 through 190 
read the file byte by byte, sending each character to the 
RS-232 output buffer. Line 170 filters any unprintable 
characters, and line 180 displays each printable charac- 
ter from the input file on the screen. 

If the status variable ST is zero after reading from the 
disk file in line 140, the end of the file has not been 
reached. Line 190 tests that value and branches back to 
line 140 if the end has not been found. The value of ST 
is changed by line 160. That is why we must save its val- 
ue at line 150 in a separate variable. 

Once the end of the input file is found, line 200 is exe- 
cuted. A CHR$(26) is transmitted, indicating the end of 
the file. The RS-232 channel and the disk file are then 
closed. 



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Completing the repertoire of RS-232 programs is the 
Sequential Receiver program on page 120. This program 
allows the user to receive a sequential file on the RS-232 
link and cither store it on disk, send it to the printer, 
or display it on the screen. 

Line 90 establishes the RS-232 channel. Line 100 clears 
the receiver buffer. The quantity (ST AND 8) will equal 
8 when the receiver biTfer is empty. Line 110 allows the 
user to specify the destination of me incoming fde. Lines 
120 through 140 steer the program in the right direction. 

If the printer is selected, an output channel to device 
number 4 is opened in line 150. If the file is to be saved 
on disk, line 160 requests the filename, aud line 170 opens 
a sequential file with that filename. (You may replace 
the '8,8' in line 170 with '1,2' for tape storage. You should 
also delete the '+"S,W" ' in that line.) If the file is to 
be displayed on the screen, line 180 opens device num- 
ber 3 which corresponds to screen output. 

The receiver buffer is read by line 200. Each charac- 
ter is written to the selected device in line 210. If the "end 
of file" CHR$(26) has been received, lines 230 and 240 
properly close the RS-232 channel and the output de- 
vice; otherwise the program goes back for more data. 

You should be aware of a couple of potential problems. 
If screen output is selected, all characters, even non-dis- 
playable characters, will be written to the screen. These 
characters may make the display unreadable. A solution 
to this is to use the same type of filter as in Sequential 
Transmitter, line 170. 

The other possible problem is that the receiver buffer 
may overflow if the Sequential Receiver program can't keep 
up with it. The solution to this problem is either to use 
a slower baud rate (replace the 8 in line 90 with a 6 for 
300 baud) or to implement some software handshaking. The 
handshaking program last month should provide a model 
for you to implement. Since there will not necessarily be 
carriage returns throughout the sequential file, as there were 
for a program file, you may prefer to stop the transmitting 
program after a specified number of characters. Once the 
receiver program has received that number of characters, 
it will send a handshake character to the transmitter, which 
then sends the next set of characters. ^ 

With the capabilities, of communicating over the RS-232 
link, it is possible to open a whole new realm of appli- 
cations for your computer. There are numerous laboratory 
instruments that provide an RS-232 interface. Let your 
computer become a data logger or a digital oscilloscope, 
periodically reading data from a digital voltmeter, for ex- 
ample. Once the measurements are stored in the com- 
puter, your software may filter, graph, or analyze die data. 
It may even provide control signal outputs based upon 
the measured voltages. 

Remember that you need some additional hardware to 
provide true RS-232 signal levels. Use the circuit dia- 
grams from last month for communicating with devices 
besides other Commodore computers. See what kinds 
of magic your computer can perform with its RS-232 
serial link. SEE PROGRAM LISTINGS ON PAGE 119 



26 AHOY! 



CAPTURE 



presenting . . 

A NEW WAY TO UNLOCK THE POWER OF YOUR C64 OR C128* 

• CAPTURE IS A CARTRIDGE THAT PLUGS INTO YOUR COMPUTER'S EXPANSION PORT. 

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V/SA- MMWCord §H§f5 



Raider Sltvici: No. 2S9 



Banner Printing Utility for the C-64 



If you had both a computer and a printer and 
wanted to put your ideas across in a BIG way, how 
would you do it? Naturally you would want to 
print a banner. First, though, you would need a 
program to help you. In its simplest form such a program 
would easily produce your message in large letters using 
a built-in character set. All that would be required is that 
you enter your message: the program would do the rest. 
Such a program could be enhanced in a number of ways. 
For instance, you might want to vary the size of your 
letters. Or you might want to be able to control the "pix- 
els." For instance, you might want to have your letters 
composed of stars or hearts. 

Streamer Font is such a program. It provides you with 
a number of enhancements so that you can easily create 
your banners. There are two listings. Streamer Font prints 
messages whereas the file, Sequela, supplies you with 
a complete character set. Sequela is a simple but ele- 
gant font that is appropriate for most messages. And if 
you want more fonts -make them! Streamer Font is also 
a full-featured character editor. You can design up to 40 
characters for one font with each character having a res- 
olution of 24 X 20. If you've worked with the 8 X 8 pro- 
grammable screen characters you'll appreciate this de- 
gree of resolution. And you'll find it easy to design your 
characters with such commands as scrolling, mirror im- 
age, Hipping, symmetry, and many others. Whether you're 
designing a font or drawing pictures, you'll find the pro- 
gram easy to use. Best of all, Streamer Font is written 
in machine language so the commands are fast. 

Since it is in machine language, you'll need to type 
it in with Fkmkspeed (see page 116). Before you LOAD 
Flankspeed. however, you must set some pointers. These 
will place Fkmkspeed high in the memory and prevent 
it from being overwritten by Streamer Font. Enter the 
following, then LOAD Fkmkspeed; 

PGKE46 , 25 : P0KE6400 , : NEW 

Now LOAD and RUN Fkmkspeed. Enter in the hexadec- 
imal addresses and type in Streamer Font. Once you've 
finished typing in the program SAVE it and reset your 
computer. Since Streamer Font acts like a BASIC pro- 
gram, you simply LOAD and RUN it. 

After a brief title page, a pixel grid unfolds and you're 
ready to go. Two characters can be displayed at a time, 

28 AHOY! 



along with an indicator that will tell you which charac- 
ter you arc currently working on. The screen is split in 
half, green on one side and black on the other. Each half 
is made up of small squares, the pixels of your character. 
Only the bottom line is free of these squares. Instead, 
this line displays letters A-Z, numbers 0-9, and a few 
punctuation marks. Most conspicuous, though, are the 
two flashing cursors: one to keep track of the pixel that 
you're working on, and the other, at the bottom of the 
screen, to indicate the current character. 

Characters arc drawn with your joystick. To plot a 
point, simply press the fire button when your pixel-cursor 
is on an empty square. Hold the button down and it will 
continue to draw. To erase, press the button while over 
a plotted square and that will set you in erase mode. If 
you wish to change the speed of the cursor, press SHIFT- 
V. The bottom line will be momentarily replaced with 
a message asking you to choose a number between 
(slow) and 9 (fast). 

As you move about die screen you'll notice a lew things. 
If you move from one side of the screen to the other, 
the background colors switch and the character-cursor 
adjusts to a new character. You'll see that the green back- 
ground follows your pixel-cursor while the character-cur- 
sor keeps track of the letter that you're working on. In 
other words, the green background corresponds to the 
character that the second cursor is pointing to. 

Nothing happens when you try to move the pixel-cur- 
sor off the screen at cither the top or bottom; it just re- 
appears at the other end. But if you move offscreen to 
the right or left, a different character appears. If the let- 
ters A and B are on the screen and you move you cursor 
off to the right, the letters B and C will appear. Push 
your joystick right and hold it, and your cursor will move 
through die entire character set, eventually ending up back 
at the letter A. 

To page quickly through the characters use the left and 
right cursor keys. Hold down one of these keys and if 
there's a font in the memory, you'll see huge letters flash 
across the screen. To find a particular character, just 
watch the character-cursor and slop when it gets to your 
letter. Faster yet, just press the letter that you want and 
you'll arrive there instantly. 

DESIGNING CHARACTERS 

There are a number of commands at your disposal to 




■i j 11 3-1 itttsuta 




win i )-j « ,( » Li.t-*-»-a-B-a.ii-u «irw 




By Bob Spirko 



aid you in drawing individual characters. Since many let- 
ters are symmetrical it makes sense to include a sym- 
metry mode. Press the back arrow and whatever is drawn 
on one side of the character will be duplicated on the 
other side. Press the back arrow again and the symmetry 
mode will be turned off. Also, you can borrow from other 
letters. If you wanted to make a Q from an O, press r"8 
and save the O in (he buffer. Then slide over and drop 
the O on Q's workbench with f7. Add the tail and you 
have your Q. If you want to make some changes to a char- 
acter but are concerned about mangling it beyond use, 
tuck the letter away in the buffer for safekeeping. 

The mirror image and Hip keys are also handy. Press 
SHIFT-M and the letter will read backwards. Press 
SH1FT-F to flip a character upside down. Since these 
keys are frequently used there arc also alternative keys 
to spare you from pressing the SHIFT key. Use the pound 
sign (it sort of looks like an f) to flip and the negative 
sign for mirror images. And to reverse the fields of any 
letter, press SHIFT-R. 

Sometimes you'll complete a character only to realize 
that it's not centered. Not to worry. Use the function keys 
1 to 4 to scroll with wraparound . If you press 11 , for in- 
stance, your character will appear to SHIFT to the right. 
The pixels that move off the right side will emerge on 
the left. Similarly, l"2 scrolls left, while f3 and f4 scroll 
down and up. 

When you first RUN the program, Streamer Font auto- 
matically clears the entire font memory. After this, a switch 
is turned off. When you exit and reenter the program, the 
font memory will not be cleared, and your character set 
will remain intact. This means that if you SAVE Streamer 
Font after RUNning it, it will be SAVEd with the switch 
off. When you RUN this program it will not automatically 
clear the memory. A minor point, since you can clear it 
manually, but it's something you should be aware of. In any 
event, it's nice to enter Streamer Font and be greeted with 
a clean picture rather than a cluttered screen. 

To clear the font memory press CLR, As a precaution, 
you will be asked: "ARE YOU SURE?". Hit Y, and all 
the characters will be erased. If you want to delete only 
the current character, press DEL. Pressing HOME, as 
you would expect, takes you to the upper left corner of 
the current character. 

One more thing on character design. Most of the 
streamers that you create will probably run hnrizontal- 



ST REAMER FONT REFERENCE CHART 

DEL: Delete current character 

CLR: Clear font memory 

HOME: Position cursor in upper left corner 

Left and right CURSORS: Move to next character 

A-Z: Move to specific letter 

0-9: Move to specific number 

SHIFT 1-5: Change character size 

fl: Scroll right 

l'2: Scroll left 

f3: Scroll down 

f4: Scroll up 

f5: Print streamer 

f6: Change printer characters 

f7: Recall character from buffer 

f8: Store character to buffer 

Back arrow: Symmetry mode 
SHIFT-D: Display rotated character 
SHIFT-F: Flip upside down 
SHIFT-L: Load font from disk 
SHIFT-M: Mirror image 
SHIFT-R: Reverse field 
SHIFT-S: Save font to disk 
SHIFT-V: Change cursor velocity 
SHIFT-X: Exit to BASIC 

ly. but on occasion you may want to create a banner that 
hangs down. Creating vertical streamers means that your 
letters will appear sideways on the screen, making de- 
signing awkward. Don't turn your monitor on its side! 
Instead, toggle SHIFT-D. This will create a window in 
the lower left corner of the screen and display a rotated 
version of your character. When you draw a letter side- 
ways it will appear upright in the window. 

LOAD AND SAVE 

Once you've designed your font you'll want to SAVE 
it on disk. Press SHIFT-S and you'll be asked for a file 
name. Enter the name and hit return. You'll notice that 
you can use DEL but no other screen-editing keys. If 
all goes well your creation will be SAVEd to disk. If not, 
you'l! get a "DISK ERROR" message; hit any key to con- 
Co/ i tinned on page 146 

AHOY! 29 



BASIC Relocattor 

For the C-64 

By James E. Hosek 




I ASIC Reloaiior is a short utility that sits at the 
beginning of your BASIC program. When 
I you RUN it, Relocator will move your pro- 
gram to make room for character sets, sprites , 
extra text screens, etc. Then, it will delete itself and RUN 
the rest of the program in its new location. You will nev- 
er again have to worry about setting up pointers before 
loading up a program. 

ENTERING THE PROGRAM 

To use BASIC Rehaitor type in the listing on page 144. 
Be sure that the proper number of A's are included in 
lines 1 and 2. This makes space for the short machine 
language routine that does the relocation. 

Line 1100 contains the value of the memory page to 
move the BASIC program to. Normally, programs begin 
at page 8. Each page is made up of 256 bytes. There- 
fore, it you needed 2K of space to make room for a char- 
acter set, you would set this value to 16. 

After you have entered the program, be sure to save 
a copy to disk or tape. This is a generator program and 
the value in line 1100 needs to be changed if you need 
a relocator for a different location. To run the generator 
program, type 'RUN 1000' {Not 'RUN*). When the pro- 
gram is finished, the READY prompt will appear. If there 
was an error in the DATA statements, load back the copy 
from tape or disk. The one in memory has already de- 
stroyed itself. 

After you RUN the generator, LIST it. There should 
be only one line which looks like the following: 

1 SYS2063:END:REM"-RELOCATOR-" 

The characters which appear between the quotes are 
the actual program itself. There should be 115 graphics 
characters altogether. Even though the Commodore 64 
editor allows only 80 characters per program line, BASIC 
allows more. 



NOTE TO INSTANT BUG REPELLENT USERS... 

if you proofread BASIC Relocator by using the Instant Bug Repellent 
printed in our November '65 issue, rather than the Bug Repellent pro- 
gram we publish every month (see page 116 of this issue), you will 
find that some of the Bug Repellent line codes listed alongside the pro- 
gram lines on page 144 will not match up. These are the correct codes 
for use with the Instant Bug Repellent: 

1: JE 920: LI 1010: M0 1050: M0 1090: JB 

2: KE 930: Ff 1020: FA 1060: AA 1100: ON 

900: JD 940: JD 1030: OA 1070: PB 1110: AC 

910: DN 1000: DN 1040: HB 1080: KE 



You are now ready to add on your own program. If 
you have a merging utility, now is the time to use it. 
Otherwise, just add on the rest of the lines. 

At first, you will not want to use the relocator when 
testing out the program. If you need to make changes, 
the relocator part will already have deleted itself. To get 
around this add the following line to your program: 

GOTO 10: REM THE START OF YOUR PROGRAM 

This will skip over the relocator program. As a re- 
sult, you will need to reset the pointers to the start of 
BASIC manually while debugging the program. Once 
you are finished, simply delete line and save the pro- 
gram. To RUN the program with active relocator, turn 
off the computer and turn it back on. Load up the pro- 
gram and RUN it, Line 1 will be deleted once the pro- 
gram is safely in high memory, and it is now safe to load 
up your character set or sprites. 

HOW BASIC RELOCATOR WORKS 

The program in line 1 is a short machine language rou- 
tine. When you type 'RUN', the SYS2063 sends control 
to it. 

It starts by calculating an offset by means of the value 
provided in line 1100 of the Generator program. The 
BASIC program is then transported to the new location, 
byte by byte. Once this is done, the relocator must cal- 
culate the new pointers within the BASIC program itself. 

H does this by adding the offset to the high byte of the 
pointer at the beginning of each BASIC line and using 
this to find the next pointer. It then saves the new point- 
ers to the beginning and end of the program to their zero 
page locations. When this is done, it puts the following 
string into the keyboard queue: 

1 CHR$(13) R SHIFT-U CHR$(13) 

Then control returns you your BASIC program which 
is still running in its original location. Of course the next 
command encountered is the END statement in line 1. 
BASIC will then check the keyboard queue and execute 
the commands in it. 

1 CHR${13) will cause line 1 to be deleted. However, 
BASIC is now seeing the program in its new location 
and will delete the line from there. Next, the R shift-U 
CHRS(13) is shorthand for RUN, and your program will 
be executed in its new spot. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 144 



30 AHOY! 




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For the Commodore Computers 



By Morton Kevelson 

Last month we auditioned Magic Voice, Voice Messenger-Speech 64, Easy 
Speech 64, Voice Master, and Voice Command Module. This month we 
speak our final piece with Hearsay 64, LIS'NER 1000, and VIC-Talker. 




State-of-the-art speech recognition. 
READER SERVICE NO. 253 



Believe it or not, a new VIC accessory. 
READER SERVICE NO. 254 



VIC-TALKER 

Talktronics, Inc. 
27341 Eastridge Drive' 
El Toro, CA 92630 
Phone: 714-768-4220 
Price: $89.00 

Talktronics is definitely the new kid 
on the block. In our opinion they arc 
destined to make an imprint on the 
Commodore speech synthesis market 
if the VIC 20 prototype of the V^C- 
Talker, which we looked at, is any in- 
dication. "What?" you may ask, "a new 
VIC 20 product at this stage of the 
game?" We were as surprised as you. 
However, it appears that the similari- 
ty between the VIC 20 and C-64 op- 
erating systems allowed for the devel- 
opment of both versions at minimal ex- 
tra cost. As a result, all the VIC 20 

32 AHOY! 



users in our audience will benefit. 

Talktronics is the outfit which has 
been running the full-page color ads 
you have probably noticed. You will 
have also noticed amazing claims 
about their speech synthesizer. This 
is one case where the product deliv- 
ers what is claimed. A surprising col- 
lection of features and technology has 
been crammed into the VIC 20 car- 
tridge case. It leaves us very curious 
as to how it will all be squeezed into 
a half-sized C-64 cartridge, 

THE HARDWARE 

The VIC-Talker is based on the SSI 
263P speech synthesis chip. This 
phoneme-based synthesizer differs 
from the SP0256-AL2 in that it al- 
lows for the control of rate, pitch, and 



inflection. The sixtccn-kilobyte op- 
erating system in ROM does a good 
job of applying these features to the 
synthesis of speech. The glass-epoxy, 
double-sided, printed circuit board 
also carries two kilobytes of electri- 
cally erasable programmable read 
only memory (EEPROM) and one 
kilobyte of RAM. 

Some sophisticated onboard bank 
switching allows this 19-kilobyte col- 
lection of memories to occupy only 
the eight-kilobyte cartridge block in 
the VIC 20 memory map. This block, 
located at addresses 41920 to 49151 
($AD00-$BFFF) is normally used for 
plug-in game cartridges. As you 
would expect, most cartridge games 
will not work with the VIC-Talker. 
There is one notable exception . The 




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For sing-along fun, the lyrics appear in easy-to-read 
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song or set your computer to play them all. 

If you've seen our Christmas Carols, then you know 
Party Songs will be a treat. Your computer's vast 
musical capabilities are used to their fullest to create 
lively music in three-part harmony. The colorful and 
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SONGS INCLUDE: 

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• My Old Kentucky Home • Turkey in the Straw 

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• Who Threw the Overalls in 
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five Scott Adams text adventures re- 
leased on 16K cartridges for the VIC 
20 will work. Of course you will 
need a cartridge expansion board to 
allow the use of at least two cartridges 
at once. The Scott Adams cartridges 
do not conflict with the VIC -Talker, 
since they reside at addresses 16384 
to 32767 ($40O0-$7FFF). 

Incidental iy, we have found the old 
Scott Adams VIC 20 adventure game 
cartridges to have a notable, hitherto 
unnoticed, feature. They are excellent 
examples of proper use of the Com- 
modore Kernal. The Kernal is the jum- 
bo machine language jump table which 
Commodore recommends to all third 
party programmers. If you follow this 
rule in machine language program- 
ming, your program should be trans- 
portable across machines. It turns out 
that Scott Adams did follow the rule. 
As a result, the contents of these VIC 
20 cartridges can be saved to disk, 
LOADed into a C-64 {at the same ad- 
dress), and they will work, without any 
modification! How's that for a 16 kilo- 
byte M/L program? 

Getting back to our review, the 
VIC-Talker can be set to intercept the 
output to any hardware devices. The 
data is then sent along to the origin- 
al device after it is vocalized. This 
is what allows the VIC-Talker to vo- 
calize the text output of the Scott 
Adams adventures. 

Installation of the VIC-Talker is 
simple. Just plug it into the cartridge 
port. Since it is completely self-con- 
tained, additional expansion RAM is 
not required. A five-pin DIN jack at 
the back of the cartridge accepts the 
video cable to either the VIC 20 RF 
modulator or a video monitor. The 
short cable which hangs from the car- 
tridge is terminated in a five-pin DIN 
plug which goes into the VIC 20 vid- 
eo port. An onboard audio mixer 
combines the sound from the VIC 20 
with the synthesized speech. 

THE OPERATING SYSTEM 

The VIC-Talker looks like two ad- 
ditional hardware devices to the VIC 
20. Device number 20 is the actual 
speech device. Information is sent to 
it by OPENing a data channel very 
similar to a printer or disk drive. De- 

34 AHOY! 



TABLE OF VIC-TALKER COMMANDS 


An (n=0..F) 




Sets volume 


F+ 




Increments filter frequency 


F- 




Decrements filter frequency 


Fmn (mn=00. 


■FF) 


Sets filter frequency 


1+ 




Increments inflection frequency 


I- 




Decrements inflection frequency 


Ilmn (lmn=000..1FF) 


Sets inflection frequency 


R+ 




Increments rate of speech 


R- 




Decrements rate of speech 


Rn (n=0..F) 




Sets rate of speech (8 to 1 range) 


IM 




Sets immediate inflection mode 


T 




Sets transitional inflection mode 


P 




Exception programming mode 


AON, AOFF 




Automatic inflection mode on & off 


FON, FOFF 




Fraction mode on & off 


PON, POFF 




Punctuation mode on & off 


1,2 




Selects voice one or two 


RESET 




Clears EEPROM 


TALKmn 




Set talking channel to ran 



vice number 21 is the VIC-Talkcr's 
control channel, which functions in 
a manner very similar to the com- 
mand channel on the disk drive. 

On power up the VIC-Talker does a 
reasonably good job of translating text 
to speech. It was the only synthesizer 
which vocalized our own test word 
(GHOT1) anywhere near the correct 
way. (GHOTI is pronounced "fish — 
GH as in lauGH, O as in wOmen. TI 
as in naTIon.) The translation routines 
arc part of the operating system. They 
handle all text-to-speech conversion for 
the VIC-Talker. They are sufficiently 
complete that the creators of the 
VIC-Talker left no way for the user to 
access direct phoneme speech synthesis 
directly. At least the preliminary man- 
ual neglects to mention the availabili- 
ty of this feature. 

As with all the hardware speech 
synthesizers we have encountered, the 
VIC-Talker has its own peculiar ac- 
cent. To get around this, the VIC- 
Talker lets you create exceptions to 
its rules. This is where the two-kilo- 
byte EEPROM comes into play. All 
exceptions are stored in the 
EEPROM. Thus they are not lost 
when the computer is turned off. Pro- 
gramming the EEPROM is simple 
enough that you should consider sav- 



ing custom dictionaries on disk or 
tape for rapid entry as needed. 

The VIC-Talker accepts over a doz- 
en commands for customizing the op- 
erating system to a specific applica- 
tion. These arc summarized in the ac- 
companying table. Among these is 
the ability to vocalize a BASIC pro- 
gram listing. This supports program 
proofreading by simply LISTing it to 
the screen, since all of BASIC'S key- 
words are recognized (and vocalized) 
by the VIC-Talker. Just be sure to turn 
on punctuation mode before starting. 

The VIC-Talker has two built-in 
voices. The modes for each voice can 
be independenUy set. This allows, for 
example, the reading of text in one 
voice while punctuation is vocalized 
by the other voice. The availability 
of the two voices combined with the 
variety and complexity of the com- 
mands make controlling the VIC- 
Talker a fairly complex task. The 
manual recognizes this by separating 
the commands into two groups, be- 
ginner and advanced. The former 
group are the ones most likely to be 
used. The latter group forms the 
complete set. 

The VIC-Talker performed well. 
We are looking forward to seeing 
what the C-64 version can do. □ 



HEARSAY 64 (formerly 

The Recognizer) 

Research In Speech Technology, Inc. 

1825 74th Street 

Brooklyn, NT 11204 

Phone: 718-232-7266 

Price: $59.95 

LIS'NER 1000 

THE MICROMINT, INC. 

25 Terrace Drive 

Vernon, CT 06066 

Phone: 800-635-3355 (orders) 

203-871-6170 (technical) 
Price: $149.00 (assembled) 
$119.00 (kit) 
This product represents the current 
state of the art in speech recognition 
technology for the Commodore 64. 
You may wonder why we're presenting 
a combined report on the offerings 
from two different suppliers. The fact 
is that for all practical purposes these 
products are functionally identical. 
They differ primarily in the three "p's" 
(price, packaging, and presentation). A 
little historical information is required 
to see how this came about. 

A HISTORY LESSON 

In the late 70's, Milton Bradley, a 
major toy manufacturer, embarked on 
a research project to develop low cost 
speech synthesis and recognition for 
their product lines. The results of 
these labors were widely dissemina- 
ted among the technical community 
with no strings attached. This data 
forms the basis of many of the speech 
products presently available. 

At about the same time the Gen- 
eral Instruments Company (GI), a 
major semiconductor manufacturer, 
was getting involved in the manufac- 
ture of large scale integrated circuits 
for speech synthesis. The SP0256 
and the CP0256-AL2 are both GI 
products. You will note that these are 
the chips used in the Ahoy! Babbler 
construction project in this issue. The 
SP0256-AL2 is also the heart of the 
Welwyn Currah Voice Messenger re- 
ported on last month. 

The most recent GI product is the 
SP-1000, a super speech processor 
with both voice synthesis and voice 
recognition capability, which incor- 
porates the latest results of the Mil- 



ton Bradley research efforts. This 
chip is also the heart of Hearsay 64 
and the LIS'NER 1000. 

As time went on several GI em- 
ployees (as employees often will) 
went their own ways. One, Dennis 
Intravia, formed his own consulting 
company (Mind's Eye Technology, 21 
Anita Place, Amity Harbor, NY 
11701; 516-848-3544). He developed 
a speech recognition and synthesis 
device based on the SP-1000. This 
was subsequently presented as a con- 
struction project by Steve Ciarcia in 
the November 1984 issue of Byte 
magazine. At this point the project 
became another offering from THE 
MICROMINT, the company which 
distributes all of Ciarcia's Byte con- 
struction projects. 

Steven Veltri, another ex-GI em- 
ployee, is now the V.P. of Sales and 
Marketing for R.I. ST. As you might 
expect, the design for the LIS'NER 
1000 was also turned over R.I.ST. It 
was perceived, and rightfully so, that 
the market for the two companies was 
sufficiently diverse so as to present 
'no conflict of interest. MICROMINT 
directs its products to the advanced 
hobbyist and experimenter. R.I. ST. 
on the other hand concentrates its ef- 
forts on the general user in the mass 
market. Along with the hardware de- 
sign came a detailed concept for the 
user interface and software. In order 
to better* manage the software devel- 
opment, MICROMINT undertook 
the writing of the Apple version while 
R.I. ST., namely Ed Garrity, did the 
Commodore 64 version. 

This is where we stand today. If 
you should happen to obtain the MI- 
CROMINT offering you will still be 
greeted by Ed Garrity's message and 
the R.I.S.T. copyright notice when 
you boot the software. 

WHAT THEY DO 

Last month we presented Easy 
Speech, a software package from 
R.I.S.T, which when used in con- 
junction with the Welwyn Currah 
Voice Messenger gave the C-64 the 
power of speech. The implementation 
was completely transparent to the op- 
erating system and the user. Many 
commercial software packages would 














i\ 


SUplSB 






t\ 




Top to bottom: VIC-Talker uses SSI 
263P chip; Hearsay 64 is similar to 
LIS'NER 1000 (Redder Service #260) 

work with it without modification. 
The Hearsay 64 and the LIS'NER 
1000 perform the complementary 
function. They bequeath upon the 
C-64 the ability to recognize and act 
upon your spoken word. Verbal com- 
mands are entered into the input buf- 
fer (and usually the screen as well) 
just as if they were typed in and en- 
tered from the keyboard. These are 
speaker-dependent, isolated word sys- 
tems. This means that lengthy ex- 
changes, as demonstrated by Captain 
Kirk, which begin with "Computer. . ." 
and end with the mechanical re- 
sponse of "WORKING" just won't 
work with the C-64. You will have 
to utter your commands one word or 

AHOYI 35 



phrase at a time. Each utterance may 
be up to two seconds in length. Nev- 
ertheless, given the overall system 
costs, the results are impressive. 

THE PRODUCTS 

The LIS'NER 1000 and Hearsay 
are functionally identical, that is. ei- 
ther software package will work with 
either hardware module. However, as 
we mentioned, the three "p's" are 
quite different. 

The LIS'NER 1000 is an open, un- 
adorned circuit board whose gold 
plated edge connector plugs directly 
into the expansion port of the C-64. 
In other words, the entire works are 
exposed to all observers as well as 
the ambient environment. It is sup- 
plied with a separate headset micro- 
phone which plugs into a miniature 
jack on the board. An RCA jack is 
supplied for audio output if and when 
the speech synthesis software for the 
SP-1000 is ready The software pro- 
vided with the package is unpro- 
tected . The making of backup copies 
is encouraged. The accompanying 
manual, in looseleaf format, de- 
scribes the operation, the hardware, 
and the software in some detail. 

The Hearsay hardware is complete- 
ly enclosed in a sturdy metal case. 
The expansion port edge card con- 
nector, which is not gold plated, 
hangs off the end of a length of flat 
ribbon cable. This allows the mtxlule 
to be conveniently positioned. The 
object is to bring the module to the 
vicinity of your mouth so as to be in 
reasonably close proximity of the 
built-in microphone. A headset mi- 
crophone is available for $5.95 to 
those who send in their warranty 
cards. We recommend you buy the 
headset. The accompanying manual, 
in a reduced half-size format, in- 
cludes detailed descriptions on how 
to use the system. The manuals were 
in many ways nearly identical in both 
form and content. The Hearsay man- 
ual did include additional explanatory 
paragraphs for what were perceived 
to be the more difficult topics. How- 
ever, some of the detailed technical 
explanations of the hardware and soft- 
ware were omitted. 

Both manuals would benefit from 

36 AHOY! 



the attentions of a good editor. For- 
tunately the software, which is sup- 
ported by extensive menus and screen 
prompts, is nearly self-sustaining. 
This was surprising in that Steven J. 
Vekri, who undoubtedly had a hand 
in the preparation of the documenta- 
tion, has authored a very readable 
and informative book on speech syn- 
thesis. How (a Make Your Computer 
Talk ($9.95), published by Mc- 
Graw-Hill, is primarily a series of 
speech synthesizer construction pro- 
jects, based on the SP0256-AL2, for 
most popular personal computers. 
The Commodore versions are very 
similar to the Babbler project in this 
issue. This is not surprising, as all 
are based on a sample circuit in the 
General Instrument data sheet for the 
SP0256-AL2. The book also in- 
cludes several chapters on the theory 
of speech synthesis as well as an ex- 
cellent allophonc table for the 
SP0256-AL2. 

THE SOFTWARE 

Copy protection aside, the main 
routines of the Hearsay software were 
identical to the corresponding rou- 
tines in the USNER 1000. The^Hear- 
say manual also included a paragraph 
threatening the usual dire consequen- 
ces for any attempts to copy the disk. 
A backup copy is available for $5.00. 

The bulk of the operating system is 
a sophisticated editor which allows you 
to conveniently train the templates used 
by the recognition package. Training 
a set of templates is a multistep process. 
First you enter a set of prompts. These 
are only used to prompt the speaker as 
to what to say when actually training 
the commands. Next, the actual com- 
mands are recorded. These will be the 
characters which the operating system 
will enter into die keyboard buffer. The 
command strings may be BASIC com- 
mands, including non-printing char- 
acters such as carriage returns 
(CHRS(13) ). They may also be appli- 
cation-specific, such as the various 
Zork commands included in the dem- 
onstration file. A command string may 
be up to 16 characters long. 

Templates are set up with up to 64 
words. These are organized in groups 
of eight. Scanning the templates is a 



time-consuming process. It can take 
three seconds to scan all 64 words. 
This process can be speeded up by 
defining a syntax for each group of 
eight words. In this step, a set of 
group pointers are recorded with each 
group. These pointers confine the 
searches to groups of related words. 

The last setting is the rejection 
threshold. This sets the rejection ra- 
tio of the stored 108 -byte template 
against the incoming word. A rejec- 
tion ratio of one (the default) will cor- 
reclly recognize a phrase about 95% 
of the time. Moving up to four will 
guarantee recognition better than 
99% of the time. The tradeoff is sen- 
sitivity. A high rejection ratio also re- 
sults in a large number of incidents 
of no phrase at all being selected. 

The templates are saved on disk for 
subsequent loading. This last function 
is performed by the Loader/Linker 
software. To avoid possible conflicts 
with other software, the templates and 
recognition routines can be loaded 
into various locations on the C-64. 
These are the top of BASIC RAM. 
the RAM under the BASIC ROM. 
and the RAM under the Kernal 
ROM. The LINKER portion of the 
LOADER is for two or more users. 
It allows up to eight templates to be 
linked. Of course the size of each 
template is reduced correspondingly. 

Once loaded, operation of the rec- 
ognition software is completely trans- 
parent to die system. The process can 
be loggled on and off by a CNTRL- 
V keystroke. Of course either the 
Hearsay 64 or the LIS'NER 1000 
hardware must be installed as well. 
Nothing happens until a sound is de- 
tected above the recorded background 
noise threshold. The templates arc 
then scanned and if a match is found 
the appropriate command string is 
entered into the keyboard buffer. 

CONCLUSION 

Either package is an effective voice 
recognition system for the Commo- 
dore 64, However, do keep in mind 
that the state of the art, at this price 
level, is still somewhat limited. This 
is in no way meant to discourage the 
capabilities of these packages in per- 
forming their intended tasks. □ 




YOUR MISSION: 

TO EXPLORE 

NEW WORLDS 

Tap Into an exciting computer 

resource available lor the VIC- 2 O 

and C64 computers: synthesized 

speech. 

Talktronlcs brings to you two 

extremely powerful plug-in 

speech synthesizers to let your 

computer sound of I In ways 

you never knew were possible. 

VIC-Talker and 64-Talker 

enhance your educational 

programs and gomes, aid the 

handicapped and generally 

increase computer 

"friendliness". 

Look at these 
sophisticated features: 

Self contained firmware - 
disk or tape not required 
for synthesis. 
Audio mixer to combine 
computer generated 
sounds with the synthe- 
sized voice for VIC- 
Talker or 64-Talker. 
Two user-programmable 
voices that can be as 
varied as your 
im agi notion - from 
chipmunks to robot 
warriors. 
• Translation of ordinary 
text directly to synthesized 
speech using pronunciation 
rules for English. 
• Nonvolatile user- 
programmable exception 
word memory permits special 
pronunciation or translation of 
words you select and Is retained 
when power Is off. 
• Contains rules for pronuncia- 
tion of text, numbers, punctuation 
and BASIC command words. 
Accurate translation of number strings in decimal, dollars and cents, 
fractions, BASIC equations, time and phone numbers. 
Easily controlled with simple commands from BASIC or machine language - 

like using the printer or disk. 
Proofread mode announces the punctuation in o different voice - lets your 

computer "speak" BASIC program listings. 

• Change the voices along with speaking text. Moke It sing I 

•The voice comes out on the TV or monitor. 



VIC-Talker and 64-Talker 
are priced at $89 each 
and are available from 



Talktronics, Inc. 

27341 Eastridge Drive 

El Toro, CA 92630 

(714) 768-4220 
9 AM - 5 PM, PST 



VIC-20 and Cod are registered trademarks of Commodore Business Machines, Intl. 




Bonder Service No. 255 



Build the 

\llO>! Babbler/Talkiing Clock 

A Speech Synthesizer for the C-64, C 128, or VIC 20 

By Isaac Michalowski and Morton Kevelson 



If you are reasonably adept at 
the assembly of electronic pro- 
jects, you can easily construct 
your own speech synthesizer 
for a total cost of about $20. The 
Ahoy! Babbler circuit board, as pre- 
sented here, is actually the basis of 
two distinct yet closely related pro- 
jects. The talking clock is a dedicated 
application of speech synthesis while 
the Babbler is a generalized speech 
synthesizer. Your selection of the 
speech processor chips will deter- 
mine the actual results. 

This project was originally based 
on the General Instrument SP0256 
Speech Processor and its associated 
SPR16 custom ROM. This chip set 
was sold by Radio Shack as catalog 
number 276-1783 for $12.95 and may 
still be available in many stores. The 
SP0256 has a small built-in vocab- 
ulary consisting of the digits 0-9. The 
SPR16 expands this vocabulary to 32 
phrases which are suitable for a talk- 
ing clock. 

The SP0256 and the SPR16 were 
subsequently replaced by the 
SP0256-AL2 as stock number 276- 
184, which is being sold at the same 
price. The new chip has a built-in 
ROM which contains 64 phonemes, 
the fundamental components of 
speech. Thus the SP0256-AL2 has 
an unlimited vocabulary and it no 
longer requires the use of the externai 
ROM . This Speech Processor chip is 
actually the same one used in the 
Welwyn Currah Voice Messenger. 
The difference between the Voice 
• Messenger and the Babbler is that the 
former also includes its own 
eight-kilobyte operating system and 
tcxt-to-speech translator on ROM. 

38 AHOY! 



You will have to program the Bab- 
bler yourself by combining allo- 
phones into the appropriate strings. 
This speech code will be stored in 
your computer as part of your appli- 
cation program. 

Since the circuit of the Ahoy! Bab- 
bler is the same for either chip and 
many Radio Shack stores still have 
both chips in stock, we are present- 
ing the specialized Talking Clock as 
well as the more generalized Ahoy! 
Babbler speech synthesizer. The cir- 
cuit was designed to work with the 
VIC 20, the C~64. and the C-128 with 
only some minor software changes. 




The basic circuits for the Babbler and 
the Talking Clock are identical. 




A bottom view of the Babbler proto- 
type shows its wire wrap construction. 



The same program will work with 
both the C-64 and the C-128, since 
the I/O chips reside at the same 
memory locations for both compu- 
ters. The VIC 20 I/O locations are 
different, which requires a modifica- 
tion of the code. It should be possi- 
ble to easily modify the project for 
the Plus/4 as well. 

The basic circuits for the Ahoy! Bab- 
bler and the Talking Clock arc identi- 
cal. The only difference is that the 
clo;k has an extra socket for the SPR16 
custom ROM. Since the Babbler does 
not require the external ROM chip, you 
may leave out its socket labeled U2 on 
the drawings. 

Two programs are presented on 
pages 118-119, The Talking Clock pro- 
gram is for use only with the 
SP02567SPR16 ROM chip set. When 
you arc typing in this program, be 
sure to pay attention to the REM 
Statements for your computer. The 
listing shown is for the VIC 20. The 
lines for the C-64/C-128 are REMed 
out. (The Bug Repellent line codes 
to the right of each program line are, 
however, for the C-64.) 

The short program for the Ahoy! 
Babbler (see VIC 20 and C-64/C-I28 
versions on page 119} demonstrates the 
basic combination of phonemes into 
words. An interesting first project 
wo jld be setting up the vocabulary to 
implement the Talking Clock using the 
Babbler circuits. If you study the code 
and the accompanying sample pro- 
grams for the Ahoy! Babbler, you 
should be able to convert the clock pro- 
gram to work with the SP0256-AL2. 
This should not be difficult, since the 
data sheets that accompany the 
SP0256-AL2 include a dictionary 



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which contains the required words, 'ITie 
only thing you may not be able to re- 
produce are the various clock chimes 
which are generated by the Talking 
Clock. Table 2 is a complete list of the 
allophones for the SP0256-AL2 
Speech Processor. 

HOW IT WORKS 

To voice a specific word or allo- 
phone, its address is placed on ad- 
dress lines A1-A8. This will be a val- 
ue of 0-35 for the Talking Clock or 
0-64 for the Babbler. A negative 
pulse from the computer on the ALD 
(pin 20) loads the eight address bits 
into the synthesizer input port. At this 
point a sequence of allophone data, 
from the external or internal ROM , 
is serially clocked into the synthe- 
sizer. The selected word is then 
sounded. Handshaking capability is 
provided through the Load Request 
line (LRQ) (pin 9). When the LRQ 
goes to a logic 0, address data is 
strobed into the synthesizer's input 
port. A logic 1 on the LRQ indicates 
thai the input buffer is full and a word 
is being sounded. Even in the world 
of Micro Technology, it is rude to in- 
terrupt someone when he is talking. 

A pulse width modulated digital 
signal is transmitted out of the syn- 
thesizer chip on pin 24, Conversion 
to an analog audio signal is accom- 
plished by a 5Khz external filter. 

THI TALKING 
CLOCK PROGRAM 

The TI$ string variable, in Commo- 
dore BASIC, performs the function of 
an internal, real time 24 hour clock, 
which is updated at the rate of one 
count every second. This clock counts 
up to 235959 and then resets to 
000000. TIS can be set in either direct 
mode or under program control. 

When RUN, the program prompts 
you for the current time in 
HHMMSS format. Enter the time of 
day based on a 24-hour clock. For 
example, 2 p.m. will be 140000. As 
you are typing in the time, the hours, 
minutes, and seconds will align under 
their respective letters. If you enter 
the time incorrectly, i.e., too many 
characters or an invalid number, the 
program will reset the screen and al- 

40 AHOY! 



TABLE 


1 - VOCABULARY LIST FOR SP0256 




(TALKING CLOCK) 




Address 


Word Address 


Word 





Oh 1£i 


Eighteen 


1 


One 19 


Nineteen 


2 


Two 20 


Twenty 


3 


Three 2' 


Thirty 


4 


Four 22 


Forty 


5 


Five 23 


Fifty 


6 


Six 24 


It Is 


7 


Seven 25 


A.M. 


8 


Eight 2(5 


P.M. 


9 


Nine 27 


Hour 


10 


Ten 21) 


Minute 


11 


Eleven 21) 


Hundred Hour 


12 


Twelve 3D 


Good Morning 


13 


Thirteen 31 


Attention Please 


14 


Fourteen 32 


Pfease Hurry 


15 


Rfteen 3.1 


Melody A 


16 


Sixteen 34 


Melody B 


17 


Seventeen 35 


Melody C 



low you to reenter the time. Once you 
have successfully entered the time, 
the computer will announce the time 
and continue to announce the time at 
the top of every minute. 

The TIS variable is analyzed to ac- 
quire the Hour "A" and the Minutes 
"B". The hours are evaluated for any- 
thing greater than 20 by lines 270- 
290. The minutes are also evaluated 
in the same manner as the hours, but 
in this case values of 20 through 50 
are checked. The reasoning for the 
elaborate checking, for both the hours 
and minutes, will become evident 
when you realize that addresses great- 
er than 20 on the SP0256 will not 
give you the corresponding voiced 
output. If you look at Table 1 , you 



will notice that inputting a 25 into the 
synthesizer will not give you the 
number "twenty-five" sounded out. 
Instead, the phrase "A.M." will be 
voiced. In order for the number 
"twenty- five" to be voiced, it must 
first be broken into two correspond- 
ing addresses. The first address is 20, 
which corresponds to the voiced 
"twenty." The following address wuuld 
be 5, which corresponds to the num- 
ber "five" being voiced. 

As an example, line 390 checks for 
the minutes being greater than 40. The 
value 40 is subtracted from the actual 
minutes value. Bl now contains the 
units of minute value and the value B 
is leplaced with the proper address (22) 
in order to voice the word "forty." 







PARTS LIST 




01 


SP02S6 


Speech Processor 


Radio Shack 276-1783 


U2 


SPR016 


Serial Speech ROM 


P/O RS 276-1783 


Ul 


SP0256 


Speech Processor (alternate) 


Radio Shack 276-1784 


U3 


LM386 


Audio Op Amp 


Radio Shack 276-1731 


XTAL 


3.579MHz 


TV Colorbursl Crystal 


Radio Shack 272-1310 


RI.2 


33K.WW 


Resistor 


Radio Shack 271-1341 


R3 


10K 


Variable Resistor 


Radio Shack 271-1721 


R4 


10 OHM, WW 


Resistor 


Radio Shack 271-001 


C1.2 


.002 mf 


Capacitor. Disc 


Radio Shack 272-1066 


C3.10 


10 mf 


Capacitor. Electolytic 35VDC 


Radio Shack 272-1014 


C4 


10 mf 


Capacitor. Electrolytic 35VDC 


Radio Shack 272-1013 


C5.6 


.[ mf 


Capacitor, Disc 50V DC 


Radio Shack 272-135 


a 


100 mf 


Capacitor. Elect roly lie 35VDC 


Radio Shack 272-1016 


C8.9 


47 pf 


Capacitor, Disc 50V DC 


Radio Shack 272-12! 


J] 




44 Pin Card Edge Socket 


Radio Shack 276-1551 


J2 




Shielded Phono Jacl; 


Radio Shack 274-346 






Multi-purpose Plug- in Board 


Radio Shack 276-152 






Grid Board 


Radio Shack 276-158 






8 Pin Dip Socket 


Radio Shack 276-1995 






16 Pin Dip Socket 


Radio Shack 276-1998 






28 Pin Dip Socket 


Radio Shack 276-1997 



The format, or sequence, on how 
the tine is voiced is stored in the array 
labeled SP(x). SP(l)=31 addresses 
the phrase "Attention Please," while 
SP(2)=24 addresses the phrase "IT 
IS.* 1 The subsequent values in the SP 
array contain the hours and minutes 
value as decoded in lines 270-420, 

Three Sound Format routines are 
incorporated to handle the 

1) Top of the Hour 

2) Units of Minutes 

3) Tens of Minutes 

Line 2000 is aptly labeled SPEAK! 
In this section the array SP is ac- 
cessed and sent out as successive ad- 
dresses to the synthesizer. Hand- 
shaking is checked by line 2020: 

IF PEEK(DRT)>127 GOTO 2020 

(for the VIC 20). The computer 
checks to see if the synthesizer is 
ready for another address. The time 
is enunciated at the lop of every min- 
ute. Lines 2050-2090 check for the 
top of the minute. 

The I/O setup (lines 130-160) ini- 
tializes the user port so that all bits, 
except the most significant bit, are 
outputs. This is accomplished by 
POKE DDR, 127. The output strobe 
is done via CB2 by the instructions 
A=PEEK(37I48) AND 15: POKE 
37148,160 OR A (for the VIC 20). 

As mentioned previously, the time 
is enunciated every minute. To have 



TABLE 3 


- SP0256-AL2 ALLOPHONE ADDRESSES 


Decimal 


.'Ho- 


Sample 




Decimal 


Alio- 


Sample 


Address 


phone 


Word 


Duration 


Address 


phone 


Word Duration 





PA1 


PAUSE 


10MS 


32 


/AW/ 


Out 3T0MS 


1 


PA2 


PAUSE 


30MS 


33 


/DD2/ 


Do 160MS 


2 


PA3 


PAUSE 


50MS 


34 


/GG3/ 


Wig 140MS 


3 


PA4 


PAUSE 


100MS 


35 


/w/ 


Vest 190MS 


■1 


PA5 


PAUSE 


200MS 


36 


/GG1/ 


Got 80MS 


5 


/GW 


Boy 


420MS 


37 


/SH/ 


Ship 160MS 


6 


/AY/ 


Shy 


2S0MS 


38 


aw 


Azure 190MS 


7 


/EH/ 


End 


TOMS 


39 


/RR2r 


Brain 120MS 


8 


/KK3/ 


Comb 


120MS 


40 


/FF/ 


Food 150MS 


9 


/PP/ 


Pow 


210MS 


41 


/KK2/ 


Sky 190MS 


10 


/JH/ 


Dodge 


140MS 


42 


/KK1/ 


Can't 160MS 


11 


/NN1/ 


TNn 


140MS 


43 


au 


Zoo 210MS 


12 


/IH/ 


Sit 


TOMS 


44 


mot 


Anchor 22 QMS 


13 


ma 


To 


140MS 


45 


ILL! 


Like 110MS 


14 


/RR1/ 


Rural 


170MS 


46 


/WW/ 


Wool 130MS 


15 


/AX/ 


Succeed 


TOMS 


4T 


/XR/ 


Repair 360MS 


16 


/MM/ 


Milk 


180MS 


48 


/WW 


Whig 200MS 


17 


mv 


Part 


100MS 


49 


mv 


Yes 130MS 


18 


/DM/ 


They 


290MS 


50 


(CHI 


Church mm 


19 


mt 


See 


250MS 


51 


mv 


Rr 30OMS 


20 


/EY/ 


Beige 


28CMS 


52 


/ER2/ 


Fir 300MS 


21 


/D01/ 


Could 


TOMS 


53 


/GW/ 


Beau 240MS 


22 


/UW1/ 


TO 


I dom;; 


54 


/DH2/ 


They 240MS 


23 


/A0/ 


Aught 


10OMS 


55 


/SS/ 


Vest 90MS 


24 


/AA/ 


Ho: 


100MS 


58 


INU2I 


No 190MS 


25 


/YY2/ 


Yes 


180MS 


ST 


IHH2I 


Hoe IBQMS 


26 


/AE/ 


Hat 


120MS 


58 


/OR/ 


Store 330MS 


27 


/HH1/ 


He 


130MS 


59 


/AR/ 


Alarm 290MS 


28 


imv 


Business 


30MS 


60 


AW 


Clear 350MS 


29 


/TH/ 


Thin 


isa^s 


61 


/GG2/ 


Guest 4QMS 


30 


IWI 


Book 


100MS 


62 


/EU 


Saddle 190MS 


31 


iwai 


Food 


260MS 


63 


/BB2J 


Business 50MS 



the time enunciated whenever you hit 
any one of the keys, remove lines 
2060-2080 and insert the following: 

2060 GET A$:IFA$=" M THEN 2 

060 

2070 GOTO 200 

To change the melody at the top of 
the hour to another phrase, or mel- 
ody, select the appropriate address 



from Table 1 and insert it into SP(5) 
in line 1010 and SP(6) in line 1020. 

CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION 

The circuit (Figure 2) is based on 
the Radio Shack data sheet. The syn- 
thesizer chip Ul, after being loaded 
with the 8-bit address (0-35 for the 
SP0256, 0-64 for the SP0256-AL2) 
produces a pulse modulated digital 
output (pin 24). CI, C2, Rl, and R2 







CB XTAL 




J1 




1 fr l 


>»v r.o 


<Z> 

J2 


1 

Z.i 


15" 
f 




U2 

CIO 




U1 




I 


[0 

11 I ! R2 1 

;i | | C2 1 




j 


] 




R' 


■l — I l 


»L 


U3 ; |_JC5 


C6 r~ \ 


+ C7 I 






5- 

• ¥ 




n 








FIGURE 1 - 


ARTS LAYOUT 


J 







A standard 
piece of per- 
forated 100th 
inch center 
board was 
used for cir- 
cuit board. 
Layout and 
wiring tech- 
niques are 
not critical. 
Wire wrap 
sockets were 
used (the 
fastest way to 
get the circuit 
running). 



AHOY! 41 



form a 5KHz low pass filter. U3 is 
an audio amplifier with a gain of 200, 
whose output volume is controlled by 
R3 (10K potentiometer). For lower 
output gain, the lOmf capacitor (C4), 
can be removed. A standard 8-ohm 
speaker is used for the output. Note 
that the SPR016 ROM chip (U2) may 
be omitted if you are using the 
SP0256-AL2. 

CONSTRUCTION 

The circuit board layout is shown 
in Figure 1. A standard piece of per- 
forated 100th inch center board was 
used. Layout and wiring techniques 
are not critical. Wirewrap sockets 
were used since it was the fastest way 
to get the circuit up and running. Al- 
though the applications in the data 
sheet called for a 3,12MHz crystal, 
a standard 3.579MHz T,V. color burst 
crystal, available at Radio Shack, can 
be used with excellent results. 



In construction, a 12-pin edge con- 
nector was used, butted up against the 
perforated board edge. To secure the 
edge connector to the board, a small 
piece of wire (use the remains of one 
of the component leads) should be 
run through pins 1 and 12 of the edge 
connector. Solder pins A to I, and 12 
to M. 

Caution: Do not do this to any 
other pins. A, 1 and 12, M are the 
only pin sets that are common on ei- 
ther side of the I/O connector. 

An alternate method of assembling 
the connector is to acquire a 44-pin 
plated finger perforated board, cut it 
down to size (24 pins), and solder the 
edge connector directly to the fingers 
of the board. If you cannot find a 24- 
pin edge connector, use a 44-pin con- 
nector, sold at Radio Shack, and cut 
it down to 24 pins. Wire the edge 
connector on your perforated board 
so that it corresponds with the layout 



in Figure 2. 

IN CLOSING 

Advanced users will recognize the 
possibility of creating a real time talk- 
ing clock using machine language. 
This will require the use of the mi- 
croprocessor's interrupt capabilities. 
Properly implemented, .this clock 
would run in the background without 
interfering with your BASIC pro- 
grams. This is a possible topic for a 
future article. D 
SEE PROGRAM LISTINGS ON PAGE 118 



SMALL THINGS 



Ahoy! is pleased to congratulate 

Frank Bcllamoni (Brooklyn, NY) 
Dcbra Gardner (New York, NY) 

winners of subscriptions to Ahoy! cour- 
tesy of New York's Small Tilings Consid- 
ered radio show (heard weeknights 5-8 
and Saturdays 6-8 on WNYC AM83). 




42 AHOY! 






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lYy this experiment! Flip through any issue 
of Ahoy! that you've finished reacting. Add up 
the hours of programming toil our feature ar- 
ticles and tutorials saved you— the hours of 
shopping our expansive news section saved you 
—and the money our unbiased reviews saved 
you— and see if the magazine didn't pay for it- 
self! Then ask yourself: can you afford to be with- 
out a single time- and money-saving back issue? 

If you're serious about programming, you 
can't he serious about continuing without a 
complete collection of Ahoy! 



ISSUE 018 -JUNE '85 $4.00 
Musk & graphics entry systems! How 
modems work! Inside the 6510! And 
ready to enter: Quad -print! Mapping 
4.4! Towers of Hanoi! Speedy! Duck 
Shoot! The 6510 Simulator! 



ISSUE 01-JAN. '84 S4.00 

64 v, (he Peanut! Telecommunications! 
lilies of the Commodore! And ready 
10 enter! Multl Draw 64 Graphics Sys- 
tem! Interrupt Music Makcr/tidilor!* A 
Peek at Memory! Sequential Files! 



Sorry... Issues ft, #2, and Wl 

sold out! Reprint editions 

(programs and feature 

articles only) 
available lor $4.00 each. 



ISSUE #12 -DEC. '84 §4.00 

Buyer's guide to printers! 1525 primer 
tutorial! Custom characters! User 
Guide lo KMMM Pascal! Diving into 
BASIC! And ready to enter: Construc- 
tion Co.! Space Patrol! Cross Rcf! 



ISSUE #19 -JULY '85 54.00 

PROM programming! 3-pan harmon- 
ics on VIC/64! Speeding pixels! And 
ready to enter: Auto -Append! Script 
Analysis! Wizard of Im! Lucky Lot- 
tery! Bra infra me! Etch! Primal! 



ISSUE #2 -FEB. '84 $4.00 

Illustrated tour or Ihe 1541! Artificial 
intelligence! Synapse's Iho; Woloscn- 
ko interviewed! And ready lo enter: 
Music Maker Part II! Screen Manip- 
ulation! Niglu Attack! Relative Files! 



ISSUE #1- JULY '84 $4.00 

MSD dual disk drive! Database buyer's 
guide! Training your cursor! Screen 
displays! File Sleuth! Users Groups! 
And ready in enter: Renuiiihcriim' 
Checklist! Math Defender! Brisk! 



ISSUE #13 -JAN. '85 $4.00 
VIC .'64 OS exposed! Sprites! 1541 de- 
vice H disconnect switch! Ghostbusters! 
And ready to enter: Ultra Mail! Music 
Tutor! Alice in Adventureland! Mid- 
print! To ihe Top! Tape/Disk Transfer! 



ISSUE #20 -AUG. '85 $4.00 

Inside the 128! Read -world simula- 
tions! Sound effects! And ready to en- 
ter: Windows! Formatter! Sound-a- 
Rama! Screen Dump! Selectachrome! 
Disintegrator! Fidgits! Galors N Snakes! 



ISSUE #3- MAR. '84 $4.00 
Anatomy of ihe 64! Primer interlac- 
ing for VIC & 64! Educational soft- 
ware series begins! And ready to en- 
ter: Address Book! Space Lanes! Ran- 
dom Files on ihe 64! Dynamic Power! 



ISSUE #8 -AUG. '84 $4.00 

Choosing a word processor! Compu- 
tational wizardry! Creating your own 
word games! Sound on the 64! And 
ready to enter: Micro-Minder! Direc- 
tory Assistance! The Terrible Twins! 



ISSUE #14 -FEB. '85 $4.00 

Printer interfacing! Multicolor sprites! 
Modems! Bulletin boards! Theory of 
game design! And ready to enter: Fu- 
turewar! Fontasia! VIC Eraser! Insur- 
ance Agent! Flankspeed! Telelink 64! 



ISSUE #21 -SEP. '85 $4.00 

Inside ihe 1571 drive and I2K keyboard! 
Sprite programming! And ready to en- 
ter: Fastnew! Go-Lister! File Lock! 
Dragon Type! Superhero! Aulo-Gen! 
Moxcy's Porch! Fish Math! 



ISSUE #4-APR. '84 $4,00 

Fctspced and Easy Script tutorials' 
Printer interlacing continues! Laser- 
disc! And ready to enter: Apple Pie! 
Lunar Lander! Name that Slar! Low- 
er case descenders on the 1525 primer! 



ISSUE t/9-SEPT. '84 $4.00 
Program your own text adventure! 
Build a C-64 cassette interface! Vid- 
eo RAM' And read; lo enter: Sab age 
Diver! DOS! Sound Explorer! The 
Castle of Darkness! Base Conversions! 



ISSUE #15 - MAR. '85 $4.00 
Making multiscreen gameboards! In- 
side ihe Plus/4! Commodore DOS! 

And ready to enier: Old Routine! Pro- 
grammable Functions! Automatic Line 
Nos.! Home Budget! Salmon Run! 



ISSUE #22 -OCT. '85 $4.00 

Create cartoon characters! Infinitesimal in- 
trigue! Inside copy protection! And ready 
lo enter: Shotgun! Maestro! Solitaire! 
Mystery at Myeroft Mews! Gravinauls! 

1541 Cleaning Utility! ShadcyDurnp! 



ISSUE #5 -MAY '84 $4.00 

Future of Commodore! Inside BASIC 
storage! Memory management on the 
VIC & 64! Guide lo spreadsheets! And 
ready to enter; Math Master! Air As- 
sault! Biorhythms! VIC Calculator! 



ISSUE #10-OCT. '84 $4.00 

C- 64 graphics programs! Bit- mapped 

graphics! Inystick programming! And 
ready lo enter: VIC 40 Column Op- 
erating System! BAM Read & Prim! 
Emerald Elephant! Lawn Job! 



ISSUE #16 -APR. '85 $4.00 

Assembly language column begins! 
Programming the joystick! 1541 disk 
drive alternatives! And ready to enter: 
Hop Around! Faster 64! Boolcr! Elc- 
check! BASIC Trace! Space Hum! 



ISSUE #23 -NOV. '85 $4.00 

Adventure gaming! ML sprite manipula- 
tion! BASIC for beginners! And ready to 
enter: Lightning Loader! Knight's Tour! 
Chopper Flight! Rhythmic Bits! Inslanl 
Hug Repellent! File Scout! Slither! 



ISSUE #6 -JUNE '84 $4.00 

Game programming column begins! 
Program generators! Rupert on input- 
ling! Memory management continues! 
And ready lo enter: Post Time for the 
64 & VIC! Alpiner! Sound Concept! 



ISSUE #11- NOV. '84 $4.00 

Music programs & keyboards for the 
64! Graphics feature continues! And 
ready to cnlcr: FrE word processor! 
Block Editor! Alternate Character Set 
for the 64! The Tunnel of Tomachon! 



ISSUE #17- MAY '85 $4.00 
Disk drive enhancements! Install a re- 
set switch! Assembler escapades! And 
ready to enter: Super Duper! Tmj-CoI- 
umn Directory! DSKDU! Raid! DOS 
Plus! Font Editor! Tile Time! 



ISSUE #24- DEC '85 $4.00 

Speech synthesizers! The IBM Connec- 
tion! The year's 25 besl entertainments! 
And ready to enter: Gypsy Starship! Di- 
rectory Manipulator! Cloak! Gamekuder! 
Jewel Quest! Lineout! Santa's Busy Day! 



Use coupon or facsimile. II or- 
dering, more than three issues, 
list choices on separate sheet. 

It you have a modem and want 
more complete Information on 
any of the back issues listed, 

call Ahoyr& Bulletin Board Ser- 
vice at 718-383-8909. 






I 



/yh 



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LEGAL NOTICE: STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION IReQulrtd by 39 II SC. 
3685) IA. Title qt publication: Aha/! IB. Mtuntiun Nu. I7JW3W 2. Date offillnj: Oci I. 1995 
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price: SW.^J 1 Complete nulling j4dresiisf turns n office of publication 45 Wrsl 34th Street. NY, 
N"Y 10001. 5 Gimpktc nui li rv *Wreis of the hc,klu,u.irie n \i tfenenjl busintsi offivei of the psiMiihcr : 
tame, 6. Full names ami complete mailing aUJre*> of publisher, editor, and managing edunr l v ur> 
lister Michael Schneider, JS W. 34th St.. NY. NY 1000]. Editor David Allikas. 4} W. 34lh St.. 
NT. N'Y ICOCI. Managing Editor: Michael Davtla. 4} W. J4lh St.. NY. NY 10001. Owner; Ion In- 
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Richard Stevens, 45 W. 34th St., NY, NY 30001. 8, Known bondholders, mortgagees, .mil other se- 
curity holders owning or holding I percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or other 
securities; none. 0. Not applicable, 10. Fxtenl and nature of circulation. 



I=»V 



RHYTHMIC BITS (Nov. '85) 

The machine language portion of Rhythmic Bits did 
not appear in the magazine. Using Fkmkspeed, type in 
the ML portion as listed here and save it to disk. To use 
Rhythmic Bits, LOAD"ML PORTION" 8.1 and then load 
in the BASIC portion from the November issue and run it. 

RHYTHMIC BITS ML 

Starting address in hex: COQO 
Ending address in hex: C0B7 



CO 00 : 


01 


02 


04 


08 


10 


20 


40 


SO 


FF 


COOS : 


00 


07 


OE 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


ID 


C010: 


00 


04 


08 


0C 


10 


14 


18 


1C 


80 


C018: 


A6 


FD 


BD 


08 


CO 


85 


FE 


A 6 


6E 


C020: 


FC 


BD 


10 


CO 


85 


19 


EA 


BD 


F2 


C028: 


00 


CI 


A6 


FE 


9D 


00 


U4 


A6 


A8 


C030 : 


19 


BD 


01 


CI 


A 6 


FE 


9D 


01 


OE 


C038: 


dU 


A6 


19 


BD 


02 


CI 


A6 


FE 


F3 


C040: 


9D 


06 


D4 


A 6 


19 


BD 


03 


CI 


FA 


CM 8: 


A6 


FE 


85 


19 


E6 


19 


A3 


19 


4B 


CO 50: 


9D 


04 


D4 


C6 


19 


A5 


19 


9D 


03 


COS 8: 


04 


1)4 


60 


EA 


EA 


EA 


EA 


EA 


28 


C060 : 


EA 


A6 


FC 


BD 


00 


CO 


25 


FB 


8E 


C068: 


60 


EA 


EA 


EA 


A9 


00 


85 


FC 


B5 


C070 : 


85 


FD 


85 


FE 


20 


61 


CO 


FO 


AB 


C078: 


0B 


20 


18 


CO 


E6 


FD 


A5 


FD 


05 


C080 : 


C9 


03 


F0 


08 


E6 


FC 


A5 


FC 


CC 


COS 8: 


C9 


08 


DO 


E8 


60 


EA 


EA 


EA 


35 


CO 90: 


A5 


19 


A2 


00 


E8 


DO 


FD 


EA 


94 


C098 : 


EA 


C6 


19 


DO 


F5 


60 


00 


00 


SA 


C0A0: 


A0 


00 


B9 


00 


C2 


85 


FB 


AD 


EC 


C0AS: 


OC 


CO 


85 


19 


20 


90 


CO 


20 


A5 


CO B0: 


6C 


CO 


C8 


CO 


20 


DO 


EB 


60 


A 4 



LIGHTNING LOADER (Nov. '85] 

Several readers reported an OUT OF MEMORY er- 
ror in Lightning Loader. To remedy this problem type 
NEW and hit RETURN after loading in Lightning Loader. 



NO 

COM* 

£tth 



Prt- 

c t : ' : 

12 

monEhs. 

123.600 



43300 

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Gdpce 

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D Pad Circulation 

1. Sam through (tej'e'j 
ml Cvmrr Srreei 
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5*3 

2. Mm SuEtSCTtAcm 
t \4UI PWI Crfd/JtWi 

(Sim c ( iDHI i".C 1062] 
□ fee DiSRiWt'tn 5y M*ii 

Cirfnfif or Olner Meinj. 

Earpp'es, Compll- 

merrtary. inri ■;:■■- 

Free Copies 
E. Tots" 0?5[nHiil*n 

(Sum crT C inii D f 
f Copies No! ttotriOultrj 

1, OfTtM UH. Lit Dy*' 
LMjccountid. Sported 
Ailtt PnrrtjMj 

?. Hetutm From »ewi 

G TaW(SumtfE,FiKl?r 



11. I certify that (he statements made by me above are 
corf eel and complete. 
Daniel ".rick. Controller 



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FOR THE COMMODORE 
C-64 C-128 VIC-20 

64K"r BUFFER 




The 




. . .Lets you compute while your 
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Imagine downloading a bit-mapped 
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You can dump 15 pages of text or a 
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can even snip over perforations, 

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AHOYl 45 



It ^ritesj- e 



^ Your computer can talk in your own 
voice. Not a synthesizer but a true digitizer 
that records your natural voice quality™ and in 
any language or accent. Words and phrases can 
be expanded without limit from disk. 

^ And it will understand what you say. a 

^^ real word recognizer for groups of 32 words or 
phrases with unlimited expansion from disk 
memory. Now you can have a two way conver- 
sation with your computer! 

^} Easy for the beginning programmer 

with new BASIC commands. Machine language 
programs and memory locations for the more 
experienced software author. 

^a Exciting Music Bonus lets you hum or 
^^ whistle to write and perform. Notes literally 

scroll by as you hum! Your composition can be 
edited, saved, and printed out. You don't have to 
know one note from another in order to write 
and compose! 

Based upon new technologies invented by COVOX. One low 
price buys you iho complete system— ovon a voice controlled 
black-jack game! In addition, you will receive a subscription to 
COVOX NEWS, a periodic newsletter about speech technology, 
applications, new products, up-dates, and user contributions. 
You will never find a better value lor your computer. 

\JV% LY >t>tjy.yb includes all hardware and software. 
For telephone demonstration or additional Information, call 
(503) 342-1271. FREE audio demo tape and brochure available. 

Available from your dealer or by mall. When ordering by mail add $4.00 
shipping and handling ($10.00 lor foreign, $6.00 Canada). 

The Voice Master It available for the CB4, C128, all Apple ll's, and Atari 
800, 800XL and 130XE. Specify model when ordering. 

UH For Faster Service on Credit Card Orders only: 

ORDER TOLL FREE 1-800-523-9230 



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46 AHOY! 



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Tele* 706017 (AV ALARM UD) 



Header Service No. 289 




MEMORY 
CHECK 

For the C-64 

By Buck Childress 

on't you sometimes wonder if Old Reliable 
has a touch of amnesia? Will it remember all 
those goodies you just packed into its RAM? 
Lots of things can happen to arouse your 
suspicions. Maybe a command won't execute the way you 
expect it to, or the C-64 keeps crashing like a DC-10. 
Heck, who wants to admit they goofed? But, when all 
is said and done, it's almost always a user error (oh, the 
pain of it). Still, with that much free RAM, isn't it pos- 
sible that some memory might have vanished? 

After another rousing argument with my computer over 
which one of us caused the latest disintegration of a mas- 
terpiece, I decided to write a program which would prove 
once and for all that I was right and my C-64 was wrong. 
After all, my dignity was at stake. So, in a gallant quest 
for truth, Memory Check was born. 

Memory Check will test every one of the 38911 BASIC 
memory locations in your C-64. It works by attempting to 
store all values from to 255 in each location, beginning 
at 2048 (start of BASIC RAM). If all's well here, Memory 
Check moves to 2049 and the process is repeated. This con- 
tinues through 40959 (end of BASIC RAM). 

While Memory Check is running, you'll see what ap- 
pears to be a shimmering object. This is a video display 
of the values being stored in each memory location. The 
object appears to be shimmering because of the tremen- 
dous speed of machine language. The current location 
being tested is also displayed. Should a bad area be en- 
countered, the screen border will turn red and the dis- 
play will let you know where the problem is. If every- 
thing checks out the screen border will turn green and 
the display will verify that the last test was at 40959. 

Since the computer must store and display values al- 
most ten million times (38911 locations * 256 values), 
while making comparisons in between, it was necessary 
to program Memory Check in ML. It only takes a few 
minutes to complete its task, as opposed to many hours 
if it were programmed in BASIC. 

After you've entered Memory Check, save it before do- 
ing anything else. You can then run it and follow the prompt. 

By the way, my 64's RAM checked out fine. It must 
be something else. After all, it couldn't be me, could it?! 

I hope Memory Check becomes a useful addition to 
your software library. D 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING OX PAGE 137 



ENTERTAINMENT 
SOFTWARE SECTION 



CALLING 

COMPUTER 

COACHES 

Team Sports Simulations 
for the Commodore 64 

By Bill Kunkel and Arnie Katz 




Direct one of twenty classic teams. 
READER SERVICE NO. 241 



After breakfast, I spent a cool mil- 
lion on a professional football squad. 
Then, I blasted a few pucks past a 
top goalie, drafted players for my ma- 
jor league baseball team, and shot 
some hoops with Larry Bird. 

All in all, it was a most enjoyable 
morning. How fortunate to own a 
Commodore computer during the 
Golden Age of C-64 sports games! 
Excellent programs are available 
which simulate every major team 
sport, and there's frequently a choice 
among action, strategy, and statisti- 
cal replay contests. 

The Whole Hundred Yards 

Football is the major popular com- 
puter sport in Commodore country 
with six titles. Designers have tried 
a wide range of approaches to trans- 
ferring the strategic and kinetic thrills 
of the gridiron to the gaming screen, 
so there's a pigskin program for just 
about every taste. 

All football games incorporate at 
least some strategy. Football without 
set plays and precise formations 
would be a melee between two uni- 
formed mobs of fitness freaks. A 
game which completely ignored the 
sport's more cerebral aspects wouldn't 
be much of a simulation. 

An action-oriented football game, 
like On-Field Football (Gamestar), 
subordinates planning to execution. 
The strategic elements serve to set up 
the action. 




Jump with Bird and Erving; bump with The World's Greatest Football Game. 
READER SERVICE NO. 242 READER SERVICE NO. 243 



Artificial intelligence makes the 
onscreen athletes more than simple 
human-shaped cursors. Coaches cus- 
tomize their offensive squads by se- 
lecting a quarterback, tight end, and 
wide receiver from a pool of avail- 
able talent. Each of the candidates has 
a different balance of skills. A par- 
ticular quarterback may heave the ball 
60 yards but lack mobility, while the 
alternative is a scrambler with a weak 
but accurate arm. These strengths 
and weaknesses subtly fashion the 
team's personality. 

The coach of the team with the ball 
picks a formation and play-routes with 
the joystick, which also controls the ac- 
tion after the ball is snapped. The de- 
fense, also employing a joystick, choos- 
es one of the four line setups and se- 
lects pass coverage for the secondary. 

Two additional options sharpen the 
strategic focus. The offensive team can 
cross up the defenders by substituting 
an "audible" at the line of scrimmage 



for the original play, and teams can in- 
sert substitutes late in the game. 

The visual presentation of On-Field 
Football is highly unusual. The grid- 
iron scrolls vertically as posession 
moves between the goal lines, while 
most other programs favor the tradi- 
tional horizontal playfield. The play- 
ers are well-drawn and correctly sized 
for the playing area. On-Field Football 
gives teams room to maneuver so that 
the game doesn't become an endless se- 
ries of desperation passes. 

No one will ever confuse the free- 
wheeling hijinks of a typical game of 
On -Field Football with the National 
Football League. This is sand lot foot- 
ball with four men on a side and raz- 
zle-dazzle plays which often mystify 
the team with the ball as much as they 
do the defense. Would-be Tom Lan- 
drys may find On-Fteld Football a lit- 
tle too frivolous, but it's truly an ac- 
tion-gamer's delight. 

Strategy football games sacrifice 

AHOY! 47 




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Hardball has TV camera perspectives. 
READER SERVICE NO. 244 

direct control of the onscreen action 
for greater latitude in offensive and 
defensive play-making. Thus they arc 
less a test of motor skills than a bat- 
tle of wits between rival planners. 

Computer Football Strategy (The 
Avalon Hill Game Company) was the 
first program of its type for the Com- 
modore and still rates as a thought- 
provoking sports simulation. Compu- 
ter Football Strategy is a one- or two- 
player contest based on AH's long- 
popular non-electronic boardgame of 
the same name. 

Basically, it's a poker game be- 
tween offense and defense. Each 
coach picks a play from an extensive 
list of possibilities. The computer 
cross-indexes these selections and 
shows the result of the play in color- 
ful animation. 

Computer Quarterback (Strategic 
Simulations) limits the graphics to the 
x's and o'x of the coach's chalkboard, 
but adds a new dimension to the strat- 
egi/.ing: variation in the abilities of 
the players. 

Before the opening kickoff, each 
coach uses a bankroll of S3 million to 
build a dream team. The amount spent 
on players in each of the 12 categories 
(split end, tight end, wide receiver, 
fullback, halfback, quarterback, offen- 
sive line, defensive line, linebackers, 
deep backs, special teams, and kicker) 
determines the quality of the gridders 
the team acquires. 

The coach/general manager can 
create any type of squad by spend- 
ing more on some positions and less 
on others. Allocating heavy bread for 
a quarterback and the receivers pro- 
duces a passing attack to rival the Mi- 
ami Dolphins, while spending the 

48 AHOY! 



Wbrld's Greatest Baseball Game: slow. Computer Baseball: replay seasons. 
READER SERVICE 245 READER SERVICE NO. 246 



same amount on a halfback, fullback, 
and offensive line can generate a 
crunching running game, SSI has 
disks with statistically computed 
models of actual professional football 
players for those who like the idea of 
directing teams bristling with famil- 
iar names. 

Vie World's Greatest Football 
Game (Epyx) is a detailed simulation 
of football coaching which frees grid- 
iron gurus from the shackles of pre- 
set plays. The computerist creates the 
offense and defense from scratch us- 
ing a simple electronic chalkboard 
system. In effect, each gamer can de- 
sign a complete play book and save it 
to disk for use in actual games. 

The outcome of all this planning can 
be displayed on the screen at a variety 
of user-selectable speeds. Plays may be 
rerun and examined in microscopic de- 
tail; there's even an option allowing 
frame-by-frame advance. 

Statistical replay games are strate- 
gy-oriented programs which up the 
emotional ante by putting analogs of 
actual players on the field. Such con- 
tests are built on extremely detailed 
mathematical models designed to re- 
flect real-world performance. In es- 
sence, a player in a stat- replay pro- 
gram will have about the same de- 
gree of success as his flesh-and-blood 
counterpart. 

Stat replay is probably the most 
precise way to repaxluce the dynam- 
ics of actual sports on the computer 
screen. In pure strategy games, the 
coaches call offensive and defensive 
plays in an ideal environment, but 
stat-replay coaches must also consid- 
er the abilities of the athletes who 
carry out their orders. An outside 



sweep, therefore, has a much greater 
chance of success if the ball is in the 
custody of the elusive Marcus Allen 
than if the lumbering Peie Johnson 
is toting the pigskin. Of course, the 
talents of the offensive line and the 
individual defenders also have a bear- 
ing on the result. 

Stat replay games never wear out. 
Just feed them a new set of statistics, 
and it's a brand new game. Publishers 
of such software traditionally issue a 
"team disk" which reflects player per- 
formance during the previous season. 

For most gamers, the best stat re- 
play program is probably Super Bowl 
Sunday (The Avalon Hill Game Co.). 
Compute rists can direct one of 20 
classic Super Bowl squads against an- 
other human coach or the computer. 

The offensive coach picks the for- 
mation (pro set, three-back, or four- 
receiver), selects a play, and assigns 
players to carry it out. The defense 
then enters its play-orders, including 
blitzes and double-coverage of key re- 
ceivers. Well-designed menu screens 
make this process remarkably easy. 

Once both teams are ready, full- 
screen animated graphics show the 
result of the play. Although the fig- 
ures are not overly detailed, the life- 
like animation captures the spirit of 
blocking and tackling. 

Avalon Hill has already produced 
a team disk based on the 1984-1985 
season. Additional disks featuring 
classic teams from the pre-Super 
Bowl era are a definite possibility. 

Tfiree-in-One Football (Lance Haff- 
ner Games) is a no-frills product from 
a small company which should greatly 
please dedicated stat replay fans. This 
all-text program features both pro and 



^w^^&ss^ 







Star League Baseball: full-field view, 
READER SERVICE NO. 247 

college teams, and Haffner Games of- 
fers literally hundreds of different 
squads, including the USFL. 

Ironically, Three-in-One Football 
requires less knowledge of individual 
players than other stat games. The 
computerist calls the play, and the 
program automatically picks the ap- 
propriate ball carrier or pass catch- 
er. The simulation is extraordinarily 
detailed, and Three-in-One Football 
may well be the most precise recrea- 
tion of big-time gridiron action. 

Diamond Disks 

The National Pastime is also well- 
represented in the C-64 universe. In 
addition to a pair of classic action 
contests, there are no fewer than four 
statistical simulations. 

The newest kid on the block is 
Hardball (Accolade), a high-resolu- 
tion action-strategy game with TV 
camera perspectives. This contest 
concentrates on the battle between 
pitcher and batter as viewed by sports 
television's celebrated "centerfield 
camera" angle. If the batter hits the 
ball, the appropriate fielder takes cen- 
ter-screen, A small overhead view of 
the whole diamond gives managers 
a sense of the big picture. 

Star League Baseball (Gamestar) 
takes a more well-rounded approach 
to Abner Doubleday's creation. By 
keeping the entire field always in 
view, Star League draws computer- 
ists' attention to the team aspects of 
the sport. 

The use of artificial intelligence, 
characteristic of Gamestar software, 
allows each manager to customize 
some aspects of his or her team. The 
hitters can aim for the fences or 



On-Field Football is action-oriented. 
READER SERVICE NO. 248 

pound out liners, and the pitcher can 
throw smoke or finesse the opposi- 
tion with curveballs. There's even an 
opportunity to bring in a reliever in 
the late innings. 

But Star League is fundamentally 
a contest of timing and reflexes. The 
defense selects pitches and maneuvers 
fielders, and the offense controls ev- 
erything from the batter's swing to the 
bascrunning. 

Even after several years on the 
market, Star League Baseball is still 
Hall of Fame arcade-style fun. It 
plays well, and it looks great. 

Micro League Baseball (Micro 
League Sports Association), on the 
other hand, is meat and drink for stat 
replay lovers. Though its graphics 
equal those of any action program, 
it also accurately replicates the per- 
formance of major league players. 

Micro League Baseball comes with 
19 classic teams, all-time great Phil- 
lie' and Tiger squads, two teams of 
old-time superstars, and the 1984 All 
Star teams. Additional team disks, in- 
cluding one which allows managers 
to trade players and draft leagues, are 
available for separate purchase. 

Although the program features a 
fairly effective computerized oppo- 
nent, Micro League is even more fun 
as a head-to-head competition. The 
skipper of the team at bat decides 
whether the hitter should swing away, 
hit and run, or bunt, and also con- 
trols the aggressiveness of bascrun- 
ners. The opposing pilot selects the 
type of pitch and positions the infield- 
ers in crucial situations. 

Every nuance is displayed in col- 
or animation. The onscreen athletes 
seem almost alive as they whip the 



ENTERTAINMENT 
SOFTWARE SECTION 

ball around the diamond after a 
strikeout or trot to the dugout be- 
tween innings. 

Computer Baseball (Strategic Sim- 
ulations) isn't quite as pretty as Micro 
League Baseball, but it may be better 
for those who replay entire seasons, a 
popular pursuit among stat-oriented 
gamers. Its graphics arc minimal, little 
more than a schematic to track runners 
on base, but its mathematical model 
considers more statistical categories 
than other programs. 

Because Computer Baseball has 
been on the market for several years, 
the publisher has had time to produce 
a large library of supplemental disks. 
These include both selections of great 
teams of the past and full seasons. 

Statis-Pro Baseball (The Avalon 
Hill Game Co.) also favors numbers 
over pictures. Because it's based on 
a non-electronic baseball game, the 
computer version benefits from about 
a decade of fine-tuning. Statis-Pro is 
visually primitive, but its play-me- 
chanic is exceptionally smooth and 
simple to learn. 

Avalon Hill has recently released a 
supplementary disk for Statis-Pro 
Baseball which reproduces the 1984 
major league season. Several past years 
arc also available from the publisher. 

Those who want the versatility of 
a program which features both strat- 
egy and action should check out Tlie 
World's Greatest Baseball Game 
(Epyx). The program, designed by 
Quest, offers both statistical-rcplay 
and arcade-action modes. 

Graphics include a full-field dis- 
play and an outfield scoreboard with 
inning- by-inning breakdowns and the 
lineup of the team at bat. The ani- 
mation is a little slow in the action 
version, but is quite suitable for the 
stat-replay mode. 

Sports Far Afield 

Baseball and football aren't the only 
team sports which have been turned 
into computer simulations for the Com- 
modore 64. International Soccer 
(Commodore/cartridge) is a pure action 
game, but, oh, what action! 

The player uses a joystick to con- 
trol the ball carrier, who can pass, 

AHOY! 49 



dribble, and shoot. On defense, the 
highlighted athlete is under the com- 
putcrist's control. When action nears 
one of the goals, control automatical- 
ly shifts to the netminder. 

International Soccer is played on 
a beautiful, horizontally scrolling 
field canted at a three-quarters angle. 
The onscreen players are large and 
well-articulated, and they respond 
well to the joystick. The program aJso 
includes a nice extra: the winning 
team is presented with a loving cup 
at center field. 

Ice hockey aficionados, meanwhile , 
may wish to take a skate with Inter- 
national Hockey (Advantage Art- 
worx). This is a first-class revamp of 
Artworx's Slap Shot. As in the earli- 
er program, action scrolls horizon- 
tally, and the coach controls the puck 
carrier (or the nearest defender) with 
the joystick. The skaters can pass, 
rush, shoot, or even body check. But 
if they get too boisterous, watch out 
for penalties. 

International Hockey provides the 
solitaire play option missing from 
Slap Shot. The new design also 
boasts limited speech synthesis and 
"penalty shots," a secondary mode in 
which a puck is shot directly at the 
goal, seen from a head-on perspective. 

The graphics and play, while not the 
ultimate in sophistication, should be 
quite acceptable to hockey-starved 
computerisLs. Artworx has taken a sol- 
id program and made it truly excellent. 

There are no team basketball sim- 
ulations, but there is Larry Bird and 
Julius Erving Go One-on-One (Elec- 
tronic Arts). Fluid animation and ar- 
tificial intelligence which mimics the 
players signature court moves make 
this one a must-have. 

One of two gamers direct computer- 
ized replicas of Bird or the Doctor with 
the joystick. Whether or not the ball 
goes into the hoop depends on where 
on the court the player shoots and how 
well the defender is guarding. 

Basketball purists will certainly 
miss key aspects of the sport such as 
passing and set plays, but One-on- 
One gives a fair approximation of 
what might take place if these two all 
stars met on a playground for a little 
head-to-head rivalry. 
SO AHOY! 



On the Farm 

The already extensive selection of 
team sports simulations will expand 
even further in coming months. 
Lance Haffner Games will soon pro- 
duce its stat replay basketball pro- 
gram for the Commodore 64, Game- 
star reports it is preparing a basket- 
ball title, and Micro League Sports 
Association intends to publish a foot- 
ball simulation to go with its popular 
baseball program. And there will be, 
as usual, several unpreviewed sports 
simulations, too. 

Play ball! D 

ALICE IN VIDEOLAND 

Artworx 
Commodore 64 
Disk; $19.95 

Alice has fallen down a rabbit hole, 
into a spectacular world of mad 
queens, white rabbits, Cheshire cab, 
and other characters created by Lewis 
Carroll, Alice's adventures have in- 
spired John Fitzpatrick to design four 
linked action games which transport 
joystick-jockeys to the heart of this 
wonderland. This all-family enter- 
tainment is simple enough for even 
a tumble-fingered parent, yet charm- 
ing enough to hold a child's attention. 
Alice begins her trek in a lovely 
park. Clouds drift over a tree-lined 
landscape, and birds fly through the 
sky as a white rabbit hops across the 
lawn. When the bunny jumps into its 
hole, Alice follows. 

The first test chronicles her plunge 
through the rabbit warren. Using a 
joystick, the gamer moves Alice back 
and forth and attempts to catch use- 
ful objects as she tumbles past them. 
There are bottles of make-me-small 
liquor, slices of make-me-grow cake, 
and keys which fit doors in the next 
room. Alice needs as many as she 
can capture for the second round of 
play, but she can only hold one ob- 
ject at a time unless she snags one 
of the wicker baskets. If the heroine 
bumps into any of the wall sconces 
as she falls through the room, she 
drops everything and must start col- 
lecting goodies again. 

When Alice finally hits the floor, 
she has to search for doors. These 
color-coded portals only open with 



the captured keys, and Alice can enter 
only if she's the right size. The cakes 
and bottles let her adjust her height. 
Each of these rooms contains more 
drifting objects and more doors to 
open if she can. 

Not everything that flies past is 
helpful. If Alice is hit by the rabbit's 
fan, it makes her too big for any door. 
If a clock hits Alice, time runs out. 
Next, Alice explores a lovely garden 
in a jumping game. While the cater- 
pillar smokes his hookah atop a giant 
mushroom and the Cheshire Cat smiles 
down from his treetop perch, Alice 
tries to capture butterflies as they flit 
past. Each one is worth 10 points. A 
winged rocking horse worth 100 points 
flies past periodically. When Alice cap- 
tures this tiny Pegasus and hops back 
down to the ground, the horse turns 
into a bail and rolls away, to reappear 
in a later contest. 

If Alice is struck by a seed from a 
germinating flower, she shrinks to such 
a small size that further jumping be- 
comes impossible. Eating one of the 
small fungi that rings the caterpillar's 
giant mushroom restores her size so 
she can continue the contest. When the 
girl has devoured all of the little mush- 
rooms, the scene changes again. 

The third game echoes the chess 
theme of Carroll's masterpiece. Alice 
has to make her way across a chess- 
board, avoiding the Jabberwocky and 
Tweedledum and Tweed ledee. She 
has two white knights to run inter- 
ference, but Jabberwocky and the fat 
twins are formidable opponents. It's 
worth 1,000 points to get Alice all the 
way across the board, but it takes 
careful strategy to gain that goal. 

The final game parodies the cro- 
quet contest between Alice and the 
Queen of Hearts. When the round be- 
gins, Alice has one ball plus any orbs 
won in the garden scene. If Alice can 
maneuver the croquet ball into one 
of the two hoops formed by the play- 
ing-card soldiers, she earns 500 
points plus another ball. But if the 
Queen captures the ball, she stomps 
it flat. 

This is a game of angles. Alice 
must bounce the croquet ball against 
the bushes and fence to make it scoot 
through the hoop. 



ENTERTAINMENT 
SOFTWARE SECTION 




■./,:&■ 



Alice consists of four linked games. 
READER SERVICE NO. 249 

Alice in Videoland is not difficult 
at its beginning level, but it can chal- 
lenge even skilled gamers at its upper 
settings. 

Still, the uncomplicated play-me- 
chanic could hardly be called inno- 
vative or original. The first contest 
is reminiscent of early videogames; 
all the computerist has to do is man- 
euver Alice around the screen to 
catch desirable objects while avoid- 
ing obstacles. The second screen, de- 
spite its stunning graphics, is a 
straightforward jump-and-grab game. 
The chess match against Jabber- 
wocky and his twin helpers, a chal- 
lenge for strategists, is the most un- 
usual of the quartet, although it is less 
visually striking. The croquet contest 
just takes some practice. 

Alice in Videoland partially over- 
comes its relative simplicity with su- 
perior presentation. The animated ti- 
tle page, with hopping rabbit and fly- 
ing birds, is strikingly beautiful. The 
garden scene also boasts outstanding 
visuals. Although the other screens 





Graphics screens in Alice in Video- 
land range from attractive to striking. 



aren't as dramatic, they are quite at- 
tractive, and their good looks go a 
long way toward making the game fun 
to play. Alice in Videoland has little 
to test the skill of action aces, but cas- 
ual players will probably enjoy the to- 
tal experience fairly well. 

Artworx, 150 North Main St., 
Fairport, NY 14450 (phone: 716- 
425-2833). -Joyce Worley 

STAR RANK BOXING 

Gamester 
Commodore 64 
Disk; $29.95 

The most exciting fights since 
Rocky III are taking place on the 
Commodore computer, thanks to the 
efforts of designer Troy Lyndon. 
Once again, Gamestar proves it has 
the courage to tackle a supposedly 
overused subject and the talent to pro- 
duce a strikingly original program. 
Activision published the first piece of 
fistic software in 1980, and there have 
been at least a half-dozen more games 
since, but Star Rank Boxing looks like 
the new champion. 

Star Rank Boxing breaks new ground 
by relating individual matches to the 
fighter's overall career. Other boxing 
games have attempted to provide a larg- 
er context for the left hooks and right 
crosses, but they are all statistically 
based. They generally let the gamer 
pick the fighter and even set the strat- 
egy, but leave the computerist holding 
the water bucket in the corner once the 
timekeeper rings the bell. 

The first step before leather hits 
flesh is to design a boxer using a se- 



Alice's uncom- 
plicated play- 
mechanic is 
hardly innova- 
tive. The first 
contest is remin- 
iscent of early 
videogames; 
the second, 
though stun- 
ning, is 

straightforward. 
Hie third game 
is the most 
unusual. 



ries of joystick-activated menu 
screens. After typing in the future 
Ali's name (up to 16 characters), the 
player determines the man's physical 
appearance, chooses an image, and 
picks one of five basic styles: dan- 
cer, boxer, mixed, slugger, or bull- 
dog. This is a crucial decision, be- 
cause it determines the boxer's com- 
puter-directed footwork during bouts. 
Once the player makes these choic- 
es, the program generates the fight- 
er's profile screen. This contains rat- 
ings for factors such as strength, 

HI 




Star Rank Boxing breaks new ground. 
READER SERVICE NO. 250 




Island Caper: the cola war continues. 
READER SERVICE NO. 251 

AHOY! SJ 



stamina, endurance, and agility as 
well as intangibles like general atti- 
tude. It's a shame that the user can't 
directly determine the last-named fac- 
tor, because no one really wants to 
guide the career of a boxer charac- 
terized as "negative." 

The game disk holds up to 40 cus- 
tomized boxers. More can be saved 
on separate initialized disks. 

The Circuit Status screen shows the 
current rankings. All new fighters start 
at the bottom, #19, and can only ad- 
vance by vanquishing either of the two 
fighters rated directly ahead of them. 

It's a long climb to the champion- 
ship held by Boris Nicolenko. Along 
the way, a boxer must battle men with 
styles ranging from the toe-to-loe 
slugging of Bashin' Bill Snow to the 
deadly speed of Flash Fenwick. 

Once the match is made, the box- 
er heads for training camp to get 
ready for the confrontation. There are 
five activities, each designed to build 
up one or more attributes. Roadwork 




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Reader Service No. 127 



improves endurance, which helps the 
man rebound from a knockdown, 
while sparring has a beneficial effect 
on stamina, the factor which governs 
bctwecn-rounds recovery. 

After camp breaks, it's on to the 
ring to mix it up with a human- or 
computer-controlled foe. The well- 
drawn arena shows a side view of 
each combatant within a ring tilted 
slightly toward the gamer to aid visi- 
bility. The crowd sends up a cheer as 
the rivals close for action. 

The boxers are fairly large on the 
screen, which makes it easy to see 
who is landing the punches. Although 
the figures look good standing still, 
the animation is a little stiff. More 
movement of the shoulders and upper 
body would have produced a more 
realistic appearance. 

Since the computer handles the foot- 
work, the computerist can concentrate 
on throwing punches and blocking 
blows. A joystick-based control scheme 
lets the boxer throw an assortment of 
inside and outside punches or protect 
the head or body from attack. A "thud" 
accompanies a punch which finds its 
mark, while a whooshing sound signals 
a clean miss. 

Each round consumes three min- 
utes of game time, equivalent to about 
one minute in the real world. After 
each round, an update screen displays 
the current condition of both men. the 
crowd reaction to the bout, and the 
officials' scoring using the "10-point 
must" system, 

A fight ends when a man knocks 
out his opponent, scores a TKO by 
knocking him down three times in the 
same round, or gets the decision af- 
ter the last round. A screen summar- 
izes the outcome and displays the 
purse for both winner and loser. All 
results are saved to disk at the con- 
clusion of a bout, so a fighter car- 
ries his record forward from one con- 
test to the next. 

The automatic footwork is both a 
blessing and a curse. It greatly stream- 
lines the mechanics of fighting, though 
managers may yearn for the ability to 
move a battered battler out of range 
when a knockout threatens. Experience 
quickly teaches the wisdom of covering 
up in such situations. 



No boxing simulation offers a more 
attractive mixture of strategy and 
lightning action. It's the kind of game 
that hooks the player immediately. In 
short, Star Bank Boxing is a knockout. 

Gamestar, Inc., 1302 State St., 
Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (phone: 805- 
963-3487). -Arnie Katz 

SPY VS. SPY: THE ISLAND CAPER 

First Star Software 
Commodore 64 
Disk; $29.95 

Mike Riedel once again proves that 
you can successfully combine action 
and strategy, suspense and humor, in 
the same piece of software. Like its 
award-winning predecessor, Spy vs. 
Spy: The Island Caper Is a one- or 
two-player action-strategy contest fea- 
turing the comic strip characters crea- 
ted by Antonio Prohias for MAD 
magazine in I960. 

The two agents of chaos who bat- 
tled over hidden secret plans in an 
embassy in Spy vs. Spy are matched 
against each other in another treasure 
hunt. This time, the black- and white- 
garbed rivals have parachuted onto a 
volcanic island where pans of an ad- 
vanced missile are buried. 

The foes must compete against each 
other and the licking time bomb of the 
volcano. The one who unearths the 
three segments of the top-secret XJ4Vi 
missile can escape with the assembled 
device in a waiting submarine. 

The outstanding feature of this 
game is that everything happens in 
real time. The horizontally split dis- 
play provides a window for each spy, 
so that players can move, search, and 
set traps as fast as their fingers can 
work the joystick or keyboard. By 
breaking through the rigid structure 
of turn-by-turn play, author Riedel 
creates a game which requires plen- 
ty of thinking, but which rushes 
ahead at the same breakneck pace as 
any fast-action arcade contest. 

The trapulator, somewhat rede- 
signed from Spy vs. Spy, is the focus 
of the struggle between the two mad- 
cap agents. It allows players to store 
and use various items en route to suc- 
cessfully completing the mission. 

A lit L.E.D, next to an indicator 
button means that the spy has at least 



52 AHOY! 



one of that item in his possession. To 
pick up an item on the island, the 
player moves the spy next to it and 
presses the controller's action button. 
A second push adds it to the trapu- 
lator inventory. 

Pushing the action button twice ac- 
tivates the Trapulator, which contains 
a batch of surprises for an unwary op- 
ponent. A spy can use the shovel to 
dig pits and punji stake traps, set up 
a snare with a rope, prepare coconut 
gasoline bombs, or even bury a can- 
ister of deadly napalm. 

Each agent starts the game with 100 
units of strength. This is depleted as 
a result of ordinary activities such as 
walking and swimming or as a result 
of setting off a trap. A sword cut during 
hand-to-hand combat costs the on- 
screen character three points, while a 
blast of napalm reduces strength by a 
whopping 40 units. A little rest per- 
mits a spy to regain some strength. An 
agent dies when the strength level hits 
zero, which gives the opponent a clear 
shot at scooping up the missile parts 
and catching the sub for home. 

The graphics are beyond reproach. 
Each window scrolls independently 
in response to a spy's movement, 
which produces the satisfying illusion 
of spaciousness. The three-dimen- 
sional perspective allows an agent to 
walk toward the foreground or back- 
ground, as well as left and right. 

Spy vs. Spy: The Island Caper pro- 
vides seven levels of difficulty. 
Among the variables are the amount 
of time before the volcano blows, the 
quantity of gasoline available for co- 
conut bombs, and the number and 
size of the islands. The intelligence 
of the computerized player in solitaire 
games is also adjustable, so that nov- 
ices and veterans alike will always 
feel challenged. 

Some gamers feel that the excite- 
ment has gone out of entertainment 
software with the waning of the ac- 
tion game boom. Spy vs. Spy: Tlw Is- 
land Caper demands quick thinking, 
but it's guaranteed to keep players on 
the edge of their chairs until the fi- 
nal seconds. 

First Star Software, 18 East 41st 
Street, New York, NY 10017 (phone: 
212-532-4666). -Arnie Katz 



KARATE CHAMP 
Data East 
Commodore 64 
Disk; $29.95 

If, like most home computerists, 
you haven't visited a family amuse- 
ment center since Pac-Man was only 
Pac-Boy, you've probably missed the 
hottest trend in play-for-pay ma- 
chines. In an effort to lure back those 
who became jaded with endless 
shooting and blasting, coin-op manu- 
facturers have developed a batch of 
quarter-snatchers which incorporate 
a lot of strategy while maintaining the 
fast pace of the classic shoot-em-ups 
and maze-chases. 

You can put away the old coin- 
holder, because a good example of 
this new breed is now available in 
translation for the Commodore. The 
home edition isn't quite as electrify- 
ing as the arcade version, but it's an 
entertaining action-strategy test for 
one or two would-be martial artists. 

The computerist directs a white- 
clad fighter using a fairly complex 
system of joystick commands. The 
coin-op employs a dual-stick system 
which could not be duplicated for the 
C-64 disk. The single-controller 
method works well, but most play- 
ers will take several matches to mem- 
orize the various stick positions. 
That's unfortunate, because Karate 
Quimp really comes into its own only 
after executing the various blows be- 
comes second nature. The documen- 
tation wisely counsels neophytes to 
play test matches against a stationary 
opponent to get the hang of the com- 
mand structure. 

To order a move, the gamer points 
the joystick in one of the eight possi- 
ble directions. Pressing the action but- 
ton while doing this enables the gam- 
er to access another group of moves. 

In four cases, the same stick posi- 
tion actually invokes two different 
maneuvers. The computer determines 
which one is executed according to 
the distance between the fighters and 
what the opponent is doing at that in- 
stant. For example, pushing the joy- 
stick to three o'clock while holding 
the button yields a middle lung punch 
if the foes are widely separated or a 
front kick if they are close together. 



ENTERTAINMENT 
SOFTWARE SECTION 




Kick, punch, block, grow huge feet. 
READER SERVICE NO. 252 




' -'f. 



Each encounter lasts thirty seconds, 
or until one fighter decks the other. 

The display shows a side view of 
the martial artists along with an on- 
screen referee who announces the 
winner of each encounter in a square 
speech balloon. A contest lasts one 
to nine rounds, and there's a differ- 
ent background setting for each one. 

A major innovation in Karate 
Champ is that the combatants don't 
always face the same direction or stay 
on the same side of the display 
throughout the bout. A somersault 
combined with an about-face shifts 
the fighter who started on the left side 
of the display to the right. This also 
flip-flops the control system, which 
doesn't make order-entry any easier. 
The extra complication is worth the 
trouble in this instance, however, be- 
cause it makes the game more fluid 
and unpredictable than any previous 
martial arts program. 

Timing is far more important than 
speed in Karate Champ. The on- 
screen surrogate performs each move 
at a predetermined speed, and it is 
not possible to program several blows 



AHOY! 53 



at the same time. Ordering a new 
blow before the fighter finishes the 
previous one aborts the move and 
leaves the man open to vicious coun- 
terattack. The idea is to enter a new 
order just as the fighter finishes the 
last one to mount a sustained attack. 

Each encounter lasts 30 seconds or 
until one fighter decks the other. The 
judge awards a full or half point for 
a fall, depending on the nature of the 
blow and the quality of the execution. 
Two points wins the round. A sepa- 
rate score, which docs not directly af- 
fect the outcome of the match except 
in the case of ties, provides an index 
of how effectively each man performs 
the various karate maneuvers. 

The winner of a match earns the 
chance to accumulate bonus points by 
meeting special challenges. If the 
fighter can knock a flower pot out of 
the air. break boards, or stop a charg- 
ing bull, it adds 200-2,000 points to 
his score. Successfully completing a 
bonus round gives the karate kid a 
chance to try again, up to a maximum 
of five bonus opportunities. 

The learning curve is steep, but Kar- 
ate Champ is assuredly worth the initial 
effort. When the joysticks are in the 
hands of two practiced gamers, it is one 
of the most exciting games to hit the 
computer screen in a long time. 

Data East USA, Inc., 470 Gianni 
Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054 
(phone: 408-727-4490). -Arnie Katz 

HACKER 

Activision 
Commodore 64 
Disk; $29.95 

Be prepared for a shock when you 
open the Hacker package: there is no 
documentation. Activision hasn't even 
included a little folder crowing about 
the "thrill of discovery." 

It's no simple oversight. To the con- 
trary, the absence of copious instruc- 
tions, design notes, and the like is in- 
tended to slightly disorient the gam- 
er and remove the security blanket 
which a rulebook represents to the 
purchaser of a new piece of software. 

The anything-can-happen ambi- 
ence is the perfect setup for Hacker. 
It promotes the willing suspension of 
disbelief which allows you to enter 

54 AHOY! 




ENTERTAINMENT 

SOFTWARE SECTION 

Careful Hack- 
ers will keep a 
note pad handy, 
as periodic se- 
curity checks 
require you to 
give responses 
based on previ- 
ously acquired 
data. 
READER 
SERVICE 
NO. 136 



the topsy-turvy world of the game. 
Booting the disk thrusts the player 
into the middle of a planet-threaten- 
ing conspiracy. As an involuntary 
eavesdropper on a private computer 
network, the player discovers that a 
multinational conglomerate, Magma 
Ltd.. plans a secret experiment which 
could blow up the world. 

The gamer pieces together little 
bits of information which flash across 
the display to learn the full story. 
When a bulletin reports the theft of 
a document which could blow the 
whole rotten operation sky-high, the 
adventurer's course is clear: get that 
incriminating report and give it to the 
proper authorities. 

This mission, the central theme of 
Hacker, should keep the computerist 
busy for many, many sessions of play. 
Someone has ripped the document into 
little pieces and given each shred to a 
different spy. To stop Magmas insanity, 
you've got to get that paper. 

How do you contact secret agents 
located all over the globe without 
leaving the computer console? The 
same accident which let the gamer 
into the Magma network also gives 
control of a highly mobile scout ro- 
bot. This mechanical probe can travel 
from city to city through subterran- 
ean tunnels. 

Once the crusading computerist gets 
the probe to a world capital, sending 
a signal causes the local spy to appear. 
The trick is to figure out what price 
each agent will take for his piece of the 
document. Some want cold cash, and 
others specific items. 

Most of the agents also have a list 
of items, including everything from 



a chalet to an autographed Beatles al- 
bum, which they would like to sell 
to the player. The player must selec- 
tively buy these offerings, because 
some will be needed to get pieces 
from other agents. 

Winning at Hacker is largely a 
matter of trial and error. The player 
tests various buying and trading strat- 
egies until the one which collects all 
the pieces of the Magma report is 
found. This is likely to require at least 
a half-dozen runs through the pro- 
gram, and probably more. 

Hacker will appeal most strongly 
to those who enjoy memory tests. 
During the course of play, satellite se- 
curity checks require you to give re- 
sponses based on previously acquired 
data. The checks become more and 
more challenging. 

Steve Cartwright has brought some 
of his videogame design experience 
to Hacker in the form of an eye- 
catching action sequence. When the 
gamer programs the robot for a new 
destination, the breakneck trip down 
the tunnel, shown in first-person per- 
spective, lends excitement to what is 
otherwise a fairly cerebral contest. 
The fact that Hacker is essentially 
a puzzle, albeit a complex one, is cer- 
tain to enthrall some and repel others. 
It is fundamentally different from 
most other strategy games, because 
repeated play is an integral part of 
reaching the solution. Those who en- 
joy a protracted battle of wits will find 
Hacker a lively test of their abilities. 
Activision, 2350 Bayshore Front- 
age Rd., Mountain View, CA 94043 
(phone: 415-960-0410). 

—Steve Davidson 







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.137 



OKIDATA 



8kimaie to 
■ - jv -.: 
T82 . 

19E 

193 
92P 

93P 

B4P 

92 image-nrnier 



'IBM vr'MVT, .ii'.o 



179 
CALL 
214 
348 
563 
349 
',!,:, 
.;.r, 
349 



BROTHER 



HR-15XL-P 
HR.15XL-S 

HR-35P 
HR-35S 
2024LP 

W1009-P 



369 
359 

.939 
839 
949 

. 189 



JUKI 



Ju«i 810C . 

FIS23? Senal Board 

6100 Tractor 

6100 Sneel Feeder. . 
Juki 6300 



LEGEND 



880 
1080 

1380 
1385 



347 
56 
119 
209 
757 



222 
262 
296 



DIGITAL DEVICES 

16K BUFFEH 75 

32K BUFFER ... .89 

64K BUFFER . 125 

DIABLO 

[};>;, 549 

630 API 1599. 

630 ECS 1"9 

:,,!:: n 2395 

P 32 C01 699 

P39 1749 

C 150 ■ 999 

DX-35 (HEW, CALL 

AP-SO . . CALL 



g§g\ 



PANASONIC 

1091 233 

313! IMEWI 2fS£ 

1092 .375 

1093 426 

3151 Letter 426 

4K BuMer .66 



SILVER REED 



EXP-100 
EXPMO. 
EXP&M 

rxc ■ ■; 



,219 
295 

749 



STAR MICRONICS 

S0 10 208 

SG-15 373 

SO- 10 336 

SO 15 442 

SR-10 483 

SR-16 5B3 

SB 10 . 595 

Powe' Type 

SG-10C-64 iNEWJ . CALL 



MONITORS 



TAXAIM 

IIS 17 G'flfl*n C 1 

us ij- *mw* Orwi 

1 121 12' QrMjrvTTL 
\-?2 I!' *«*» TIL 
|2?r) 1*' Cw Coripwle 
luc 1?' RG8 Hi Hn IBM 
1 4io 12 nuB Supn - -■'.• 
luO 12" ACS U'l-j M Rri 
JTiIe 5iand 

ZENITH 

IZV'M 12JA Amber 
(ZVM 1 230 Green 
I.-.V .'.- :'.' 
I ZVM 131 Cnlw 
I ZVM 133 RCB 
I ZVM 135 Ccnpo*]c 
IZVM 136 Hi P.»i> Color 

Izvm tao 

I ZVM 1230 

I ZVM 12.10 



CALL 
CALL 
135 
145 
2S9 
329 
409 
556 
35 



75 
75 

■: ■ 

275 
389 
449 

95 
91 
149 



TEKNIKA 

I MJ-10 Compos re 179 

| MJ-22 PGB 255 

AMDEK 

1 300 Gioorv 118 

1300 AtntMM 128 

1 ,51 (I ArnlHT IBM 155 

I Color 300 AllUm 234 

I Color 500 Compose 369 

i. ,.,.- i,()0 397 

It T '!U 195 

ICoicn 710 569 



PANASONIC 

DTUCOO 13 flCftContOK* 247 

DTMUfJ IS - fWa-Co-nios* 329 

DTMIOj 10 RGB H, fici 395 

DTS101 10 Corrfjost 175 

DT1O30O 10 RGB 166 

TX12H3P 12 CoW 418 

THOSUrM 12" Giwi 109 

■fi-7CVBPft I?" A-nW 109 

TA1Z2V9P 12" Green IBM. 149 

Ifl:22VVP C A-ntir/ 1B-V' 148 

SAKATA 

SG 10O0 12" Grow 99 

SA 1000 i?" Amwr 109 

BQ tSOO 12" Greo'l TTL 119 

SA 1500 12 Amt»r TTL 129 

SC 100 13' Color Cornp 209 

SCHW 13" RGB LB'I 
1 5O0 G CALL 

1600 A CALL 

STS1 Till Sland 29 

NEC 

JE-1260 Green 96 
JB-12Q1 '■ 

JC 1215 Color.. . . 235 

JC 1216 RGB 375 

JC MM Color 265 

JH I20 1 ) Amber 139 

PRINCETON GRAPHICS 



MAX- 13 Amber 
HX 12 RGB 
SR-12 RGB 



185 
465 
595 



DRIVES 



COMTEL 

Enhancer 2000 (C-64] 



INDUS 
QT ATARI 21* 

r.T COWWOUOHE 2J*i 



179 

M5D 

SO! Dnw IC 641 

$02 Drive (C-64i 



INTERFACING 



DIGITAL DEVICES 

U-Prim C (C*4| 49 



ORANGE MICRO 

Gr»po'er CD (C-64 1 . 79 



ORD 



GPC 1C64| 



CARDCO 



G Wii (C-64J .. 
Cn * G (C-641 
p?PS iC-WI'. 

era. (C-64 1 



.45 
.49 
39 



TYMAC 

Conntc-Tion (C-64J 55 



MODEMS 



HAYES 

Srnarlmodern 300 
Smarlmodem 1200 
Smanmodem 120OB 
SmarlrrKdorn 2400 
Mcnxnodem ME 

Wrjslrldoe (C-64) 
Miey Mo Modern 
CombUSOOrB 



133 
377 

347 
598 
136 

59 
69 

1985 



NOVATION 

IBM- inn '1250 MS tDSril 
:■■ . ,■ 

IBM WO ■: MM ■' 

iHM JM'12M(J4C0 MSOOS 

.. .. ■ ■-,; .. 
IBM CW ST. el 

V • H 

>■.. ■ :.i! I 



311) 

:■■. 
;_ ":i 

'.75 
;■ 
21 

11! 



TELE LEARNING 

Total Telecomrnunkralions 
(C-64) 29 95 

AP-2601300 9eud AppWj 69.95 
IB-2501300 6am) IBM) 69.95 



ANCHOR 



VolKamoOem 
Vorxsmodem 12 
Mar* 12 



55 

IBS 
229 



BUY LYCO AND ENJOY 



TOLL FREE ORDER LINE 



THE LOWEST PRICES 

Free shipping on prepaid cash orders m US 

All MercfiandiM Factory Fresh 

Access to our Multi-Million S Inventory 

Orders outside PA save state sales tan 

Full Manulaciurer's Wauanly apply 1 

Purchase Orders Accepted (ram educational institutions' 

We chock tor stolen credit cards' * We ship lo our servicemen overseas 1 



24 hrs snipping on in-stock product 
No deposit on UPS C D. orders 
Air fre<ghi service avaiiaoie 
Full accessory line m stock 



TOLL FREE 1-800-233-8760 



jjpj 



TO ORDER 



C«U TOIL F«E [ 

800-233-8760 



O' tend ordt* 10 
Lyco Compuler 

p o eo« ipsa 

Cutlomni Snr^ico 1 -7 17-327-1 02 5 J. ric, Shore P* 17 740 



RISK FREE POLICY 

IMHM Mm iflrfpM *«*w W hewn tl v4m No omrn* V C D vo#ri ?nm 

thipp-infl yi pmtfiiuP tuh ort«* withtn tm [fm-fitniii u S Vokm^t -tlKnWM 

■ «lir4«N« f'»'H,W-J| ^iUM'lLl *f-.S FPU m! -r1»-.t'iV. 1 '. *"t kV 

eft* *dVH^»o'MMt*<Vfl»v»4 pwvx**ttwcmnoLt.t* ****** 'tttwitm 
baivMi tr«HirX M XHMt Uf»5 M »«J R4*S ktt*i t**qr™3 *i •^•rt*3*«3iM 
tjir'#4 ir"v>*' Tn*n**t*rm'*+vtin*T F*«» EMt^g p^ti crt< ' Aim __ 
td ChrVig* "^tfioV nO«» 



CUSTOM ROM $1995 



NOW YOU CAN HAVE YOUR COMPUTER POWER UP MESSAGE SAY ANYTHING YOU WANT. IN ANY COLOR YOU WANT. 

Color of Cursor • Color Of Screen ■ Color Of Border • Choose Up To 31 Letters As Your Power Up Message 



Also Included is Itie 2 Key Load. Pressing the SruWRun Slop will load '■■". 8, 1, 
You can choose Iram any 01 these colors: Black, White, Reo". Light Red. Cyan. Purple Green, Light Green. Blue. Lic/hl Blue. Yellow. Orange. Brown. Dark Grey. Medium Grey, bght Grey 

P.S. . . . II sure is nice hairing your own colors and message on the screen on power up! 



MASTER LOCK 



Here al I a s ( . is a program that will protect your sdlware programs trom unauthorised 

duplicating. 1 to 1 million copies can go protected, fast And easy 

* Specially designed Tor the C-64 and 154T Disk Drive 
« Completely encrypts and protects your programs. 

* Fully compatible with almost all machine language and basic programs — can even 
support chained programs, 

* Contains a spec 'a! leature which protects your program from being broken ' 

* Incorporates all the lalost techniques *n program encryption and protection. 

* Each system has been specially prepared and is unique from all othe' systems — only 
you .ire Ohio to make working nuplicntes ol your own protectee? programs 

* Simple and easy to use - entirely menu drive with prompts 

* Will atop virtually all sollware copierr* from duplicating your programs- 

* Fast and reliable protection routine dges not take away any useable space Irom your 
dish — all 664 blocks are AvaUebte for use. 

* Easy lo lolFow step by step instructions am included on the disk 

* A must lor aN programmers who do not want their programs to be in public domain! 

Even the ' nihbleri' nan t copy them Not evon 'Disk Maker. , MrsteT Nibbles. ■Copy il "Ultra 
Byte or *Fast Hackem The lime to protect you dlgk Is only S ifivel seconds and each Master 
Lock makes a different projection scheme Only 

'Disk Maker™. Basm SOQ95 

'Mister Nibbles™. Full Circle *W*7 

'Copy II™ Central Pomi Software 

'Ultra Byte™, (Jura Byte 

•Fast Hackem™. Sasemenr Boys Software 



TOOL BOX 

This disk has over 100 routines, some ol them are routines lor protection, smooth scrolling. 
modem roulines. and sound and color roulines bootmaker, paddle and toystick road ter- 
minal, aulo dial, buio answer. They can easily be Incorporated mlo all ol your programs. It is 
also fully documented Wild thrs disk alone you could build your own program This disk has 

a lot of tucks that are used In commercial software. 

95 



19 



SWIFTERM AND MODEM 

This is the best package anywhere! 

SWIFTERM: 

is absolutely Ihe easiest terminal program available anywhere 

• Works wilh the 1660. and Wcslndge Modem . Auto dial (with aulo radian 

• New printer and mrdwestern prolocal • 29K storage buffer 

• Prinlerdump . gave to disk 

• DOS commands access from menu . Standard ASCII up'down loading 

• Phono book . 30011200 Baud 

This rs an excellent easy Eo use program for a very reasonable price 

THE MODEM: 

Auto dial, auto answer. 300 Baud modem thai is tOO*.. compatible with Commadou tSM 
modem, so all our sollware will run with it ^ _ 

SOE06 

ALL THIS FOR ONLY 03 
So why buy iust another leimmaf progtam when you can get a modem, too'" 



300/1200 BAUD 



Modem for the C-64 



WUh SWIFTERM 



s 169 00 



GRAPHIC LABEL MAKER 

Give your J a her s the professional touch With HI Rrjj Graphics make your own desfgn or use 
one our 60 premade Libels with easy to use on screen editor You can insert up to three imes 
ol tejil itien choose the picluie ypu want to pul On ihe loir hand side ol me label Then you 
can print out as many labels as you warn This has got to be the neatest label program out 
there and It's only C/\ j Qc 



[M.lis= 



s 24 { 



[^*- ;-.*.' "■',"'■' 




*" '<ii-< 






*!;•";* 



J' ::\:\ 



'Alio available — flip v-raretf Graphic package lo* rrte 64 and 
your print sr>oo [here's 60 Hi Htufleiuni 



! 24 



95 



1541 M.A.S.H. 



Now you can service your own ,541 dJskdrWfl using 154 1 M A. s.H. Save rjig bucks on repair 
burs, Rate the performance ol your drive Test and adfust ^PM's Test and adjust head ahgn- 
meni step by aiftp instructions thai anyone can follow Pays for itsell the hrsl time you use 
il to adjust amisbehavrngdnve No knowledge of eeclromc* is necessary All you needs is a 

screwdriver antf 20 minutes. 



NOW ONLY 



S-jg95 



DISK TRACKER 



Now you cai log all ol your disks mlo a neal tiling sysiem Automatically record disk names 
and program lilies. Allows you lo quickly scan what you've got. Sorts titles: prims tacKel 
covers: store up lo 1600 disk directories on one disk Search rjuickly through your entire disk 
collection tor a mrspiacad program Works wilt] one drive or iwo Fast, easy operation This 
progiam Is a must lor everyone i ft 

s 19 95 



ONLY 



THE XXXXXXXXXX 

X-RATED GRAPHICS LIBRARY 

Your Print Show May Never Be The Same! 

X-Rated (Supines guaranteed to spice ud your special letterheads, g'eelwg cards, signs and 
banners' Everything fiom mild lo Look Out Nelly' 60 Erotic additions lo haal up your print 
shop graphics library, plus S ribald Screen Magic additions' fi 

5 24 



Pnnl Shop is a trademark ol Bioderfiuntt. 



GRAPHICS & GAME DISK 

x-flaied adventure like you navo never seen before. Complete wltt| graphic simulations 

Plus: X-Rated Cartoons $24 95 



HAVE WE GOT A MESSAGE ... FOR YOU! 

s?c"d 9 s"eacn SaUniqU< ' !,raIJMCS lnl8 « rilionD ' 1[:k »9 ewhl[:h '" l «^)'<="»™"tlnu usly display hiresoiutlon and multicolor files. Up lo 12 hi.,- maybe stotad in memory and displayed Horn t lo5s 

Messaoe ... can use Print Shop -Screen Magic li.es. Fl „draw Hies, Poodle !. Koala Painter, and more! M.a.ag. . . . even comes with a 'Screen Maker' prorjram lo create your own manage Hies' 

Se* 'Mus" 9 MaV„ v ZT m "'""^ 1i,,eS ' 0r h ° mE V ' de ° a ' *" S " 0WS ' e,C ' ■ ' ' M "" g ' ' " 8,Gn p,a * s "^«>""° "»««= to accompany displays and you can create you, own musrc Hies w.lh 

Also Included era 'Graphic Alda' utilities lor conversion ol dilt.renl tile types. Including con,.r>lon of Koala Painter tiles to Doodle or Print Shop! 

.-„, , „ ,,, „ The price for all this? Just 19 including shipping and handlina 

Acruat number or riles dependent en rue compiet'ty 3 t^h""a ««■«< """"""y 



MAGNUM LOAD 



MAGNUM LOAD Is a new replacement KERNAL LOperatirrg syslemi ROM chip tor your Com 
modor-55or 128 computer thdl wrll lead and verily programs up to 6 I imos faster [han before. 
The tape routines have be-on removed trnm [hf? olrt chin g^d in their olace hane been put a 
high-speed loader, high speed verify, and disk Oliver no-head -rat (In routine Unlifce the older 
carifrdge last loaders, no pofla are tied up fll Ihe rear of (he computer, the screen is noi 
pranked during loading and then? is no wear and tear on the expansion pnM For mam mum 
convenience and performance, 1Mb chip is InslaNed directly in tha circuit board. Generally a 
soctet has already been provided to make the operation easy. Put occasionally some solder- 
ing may be required: Now you can give your 13-41 diaK drive "1571 speed. " 

Rather than give you more enaQgraled claims about how many limes Lister our ROM chip is 

compared to the slower cartridge versions, a comparison chart Is supplied listing 
MEASURED loading limes. 



Star- 
Dos 



Programed by Jim Drew 

Program 

Pus top II 

Music Shop 

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy 

Onheidfoolbali . . 

EASVRNANCei 

$24^5 

For 1541 or MSD Version 
'Will AQ1 (351 load -defaulted back to regular load 



Reg. 
Load 

14d see. 
IOS see. 
70 sec 
149 sec 

58 nee 



Mich 

s 

43 sec 
105 sec • 
,'0 ■.,.- ■ 
66 set 
13 sec 



Fasl 
Load 

41 aec 
105' 

NO" 

63 sec 
13 sec 



LOAD 
31 sec, 
21 sec, 
68 sac. 
56 sec. 
1 1 sec 



s 39 



95 



for Combo Version 

1 ' Faded to load al ail 



D-CODER 



• Translates any machine language program into easy to ready English descriptions wilh 
complete explanations ol each command. 

■ Makes complete notations of all Important memory locations accessed by me program 
(SID. VIC, MOS. KERNAL »\QA 

■ Gives you Ihree ways Ol accessing programs: 

1. Will read and list programs from DISK 

2. WHI read and list programs from MEMORY 
%. Direct user input (from magazines, ale.) 

• Can be used to locate and examine any machine language program's protection 
rou lines'! 

• Can be used to easily break apart machine language programs for sludy and 
exam 1 nation* 

• Primer option for complete hard cooy Hatlnga! $-1 Q95 
You no longer need lo bt an EGGHEAD to read Machine Language, I %7 

NCODER 

THE PERFECT COMPANION PROGRAM TO D-CODER! 
Allows you lo easily make changes in machine language programs . right on Ihe disk! 

• Rewrite ability allows code to be tillered and men rewritten directly lo mo disk! 

■ Features sector by-sector scrolling assembly language display ol machine language 
programs' 

• Notation ol ASCII tent equivalents tor easy spoiling of embedded tent strings 1 

' Handy reference display ol all assembly language commands ana tneir ML numerical 
equivalents! 

■ Byte spinier tot easy ipHltlrtfl of decimal Si Q"5 
addresses into low bvie-high byle format' I & 



SOFTWARE PROTECTIOM HANDBOOK 
Third Edition! Now Available! 

If you're tired ol being harassed by protected software and loo many copy programs then 
this is me Book tc you 1 This ?2* page manual co«ers me gamut from legalities lo protection 
mothods lo step-bystop back up procedures. Now you can loam both how to protect and 
unprolect software! The techniques covered include copying cartridges to tape or drsk. lape 

prelection, anil disk protection. Disk protection covers etrot numbers 20. 21.22.23. 27 and 29 
plus single Hack formatting, header modification. Header swapping, halt track reading and 
writing reading and mmjilied bit densities, formaltmg rllegal irack.'sectors.sync writing and 
more! The Third edition eiplalna. tells how lo detect and how to write them with included 
scllware 

SHQ95 
C-M Book Only U US 

s 29 B6 ur 

Book* Disk ol all Programs fc " u=> 

TWsmenuatdoes not condone piracy 'Shipping, 12 .00 

TRACK TRAP' The 1541 Disk Expander! 

• Supplement to the Software Protection Handbook • 

Themost unusual and mnoualiwe protection analysis lool lor ihe Commodore ye|i - Noi For 
Beginners - Thrs syslem expands your 1541 dtrve giving capability otherwise only possible 
tor provisional disk duplication equipment. Now you can create or anaiy« o»otle forms ol 
disk ptolection •O.O.S. Klngf Take No«r - Entire tracks ol data can be tead and written 
. wrlhout regard to 'standard' sync and formal. You ato noi longer limited tosoetor by sector 
searches Whole Iraek readouts reveal hidden date even when ail o< most ol Ihe seciots have 
Been erased. Uncovers and writes data under errors, pulse coded sync or data, h.dtfon data 
and access codes, multiple Iraek densities and more 1 This supplemental manual covers Ihe 
complete implementation of the Hack trap system including necessary sollware and 
hardware documentation 

SQ95 
Track Trap disk expanded manual ™ us 



Top Secret Stuff I and Top Secret Stuff il 

Bfogramtrj by Jim Qiow 

Are both coUectiflnsef 20 urograms per diskette (that works oul to about Si GOper pmflfam'i 
Ihal help you Qiplpre and enhance your Commodores* and'or 126 and t*>4l 0«s>- drive Now 

you can unlock many sect els formerly known only to top machrne language progrpmmers by 
using -these sophisticated "tools "I! you have ever haen curious about the inner workings o* 
your computer system, now is your chance to dig in and hnd answers with the help nl these 
programs. These collections of programs have golten rave reviews Irom actual users, and 
we are sure thai you. too. will be pleased. 

The programs Include on each diskette ire llited tjalew 



TOP SECRET STUFF I 

Tha Dock -iviewi'repalr disk contents) 

Sync Checker rtfiskeite) 

Imbedded Track Number Creator 

Dltk Manipulation System 

3 Minute Copy (backup program) 

Diskette Malchar (compare seclorsl 

UnicratcM A File (recover lile) 

View BAM (block allocation map} 

1541 ReadWrite Test 

Vi Track Reader 

Header Header (display disk header) 

Sync Maker 

Device Number Change {disk drivel 

Electronic Arts Backup 

Drive Mon (disk drive m'1 monitor) 

Oliketle Fit* Log (start end address) 

Wrlle Protect Sensor Tesl 

Repair A Track [recover data) 

Fast Format (10 seconds! 

Vi Track Formatter 



TOP SECRET STUFF II 

RAM Tesl Host Computer RAMI 

Copy JAOOO IFFFF (under PQMSj 

Display O-C-R. (All sector data) 

Ln Write Protect (diskette) 

Unnew Program 

Wedge 16000 

Smooth Scroll (messages up screeni 

Koala Dump (koala pad screen dump) 

Disk Minlputalion System 

Disk Eraser •','■•< second clean wipe) 

Spill Screen iTWO screen colors) 

Disk Protection Sytlem (stops copiesi 

Writ* Protect Cdlskeltei 

Bool Maker lautobook BASIC programs 

Wedge ■ ICOOO 

Qiakmaicher 11 ihign speed version) 

No Drive fl stile ion ruatfing errors) 

3 Times Disk Drive Head Speed 

Monitor Tail (check video monitor i 



s 19 



95 



s 19 



95 



WAR GAMES AUTODIALER 

1. Aulo Dial will automatically (jilt a set ol numbers you choose 
2 r Review Numbers *«n review numbers that were answered by a 

computer. 
3. Save Numbers wilt save numbers where a computer answered 
A. Herdcopy ol Numbers will print oul list ot numbers where a com 

Bute' a^swerod 

5. LOAD Numbers wilt load In numbers lo continue where il leit oil 

6. Conllnue will cck up dialing where it was interrupted 




BBS 



• 30Q''12GO Band 

• Remote access lor sysop 

• 2 levels ot security lor up and down load 

• 7 rooms (read and write) with 4 security levels 

• Secret highest level 

• Open chalk board 

» Auto message cycling 
» Printer option 

Plus the only BBSwilh all ihreetfi prolicais Xmodem, 

.iew punter and midwest term, so anyone can up/down 

load 

Oon'l be fooled by cheap imitations. This is the most 

comprehensive system available anywhere Now at a 

new low price. 



- M 






jit x^ 



5 39 



95 



Enclose Cashiers Check, Money Order or 
Personal Check. Allow 14 days for delivery. 
2 to 7 days for phone orders. Canada orders 
must be In U.S. Dollars. VISA - MASTER 
CABD - C.O.D. 

Programs (or CG4 S2 00 S & H on ell orders 

Soltware Submissions Invited 




Meg a Soft Limited 

P.O. Box 1080, Battle Ground, Washington 98604 

Phone 800-541 -1541 * BBS 687-5205 Alter Hours Compuler to Compuior (BBS) 



Reeder Service No. 29? 




HAUNTED CASTLE 



For the C-64 

By Derrick Brundage 



Your task in Tfw Haunted Castle is thirty sim- 
ple: avoid the ghosts while searching the 
castle for three treasures. It sounds easy, but 
it isn't. First of all, the castle has over 1000 
rooms (1100 to be exact) spread over 11 levels {100 per 
level). Second, the ghosts open and close the doors lead- 
ing from each room at will, and you have no key with 
which to unlock them when they are closed. If a ghost 
catches you, it will steal a treasure and place it some- 
where else in the castle. Should a ghost catch you with- 
out a treasure, the game will end. 

Despite ail this, you have a few things going for you. 
For one. you don't have to search ail the rooms of each 
level for stairs and treasures. The number of the room 
you are currently in is displayed, as well as the room 
numbers of all staircases and treasures on that level. If 
the treasure location reads "NONE." there is no treasure 
on that level. Staircase room numbers work in the same 
fashion. Once you have found all three treasures, return 

60 AHOY! 



to the room you started in (room 00 on level 0). 

Movement is as would be expected: move the joystick 
in one of the four general directions and your character 
will move. You simply guide it away from ghosts and 
through open doors. To go up or down a level, just en- 
ter a room with a staircase going to the level you desire. 
Touch the staircase and WHOOSH!!! you're there. To 
get a treasure, enter a room with one and touch it. 

After reading the above, it may seem that I've made 
the game too easy with all the room numbers. But the 
game is difficult enough with just the randomly open- 
ing and closing doors. In the original program, I left the 
player with nothing more than the current room number 
and the number of treasures, but the game proved far 
too difficult for my liking, so I added all the "extras." 
When you play the game you will find that it is still quite 
challenging, and it doesn't require nearly as long to play 
as the original, though it will still take about half an hour 
to play to completion. 



Fleet System T. 
Word processing that spells V-A-L-U-E. 




For 
C-64 

andC-128 

Full Support 
of Commodore 
128 Mode! 



Complete word processing with built-in 
90,000 word spell checking- 



Up till now, you'd have to spend a mini- 
mum of about S70 to get a good word 
processor for your Commodore 64 T "-V128T M 
And if you added a small, separate spell 
checking program, you'd be out well 
over $100! 

Now there's fleet System 2! It's two 
powerful programs in one, and it's per- 
fect for book reports, term papers or full 
office use. 

Fleet System 2 combines the EASIEST 
and most POWERFUL word processor 
available with a lightning- fast 90,000 
word spelling dictionary — all in one 
refreshingly EASY TO USE integrated 



You can even add over 10,000 "custom" 
words to the built-in 90,000 word dictio- 
nary. And at a suggested retail price of 
579.95, Fleet System 2 really spells 
V-A-L-U-F, and 90,000 other words too! 

Fleet System 1 helps people of all ages 
to learn to spell correctly and write better 
too. It's the ONLY full featured word 
processor that provides vou with helpful 
writing and VOCABULARY FEEDBACK 
such as: the total number of words in 
your document, the number of times 
each word appears, and total number of 
"unique" words, just to name a few. 

Fleet System 2 has every important fea- 
ture that will help you make child's play 



out of the most heavy duty typing tasks. 
There's Built-in 80 Column Display — so 
what you see is what you get. Horizontal 
Scrolling During Typing, Easy Correction 
and Movement of text, Rage Numbering, 
Centering, Indenting. Headers and Foot- 
ers, Math Functions, Search and Replace, 
Mail Merge, BUILT IN 90.000 word 
SPELL CHECKING and much, much 
more! 
Ask for Fleet System 2. 

Exceptionally S«SJ( Packed I 
with Power. Perfectly 
Priced. 



system. Finally, spell checking is now 

available at your fingertips, 

IN CANADA, CALL 1-800-661-8358 - PHASE 4 DISTRIBUTING 



s**° ***** 



>!PSI 



COMMODORE 

USERS GROUP 




Call I-80O-343-4O74 for the Dealer nearest you! 

Professional Software, Inc., 5 1 Fremont Street, Ncedham, MA 02 1 94 (6 17) 444-5224 



mrk ill I'mlrviiinul Viliwarr. Hit — 1 kn Sclera 2" wMdrtljDKilMUl wrttcnhy VHuinlfiinii v Mil 
trademark! ill Commodore IHcnmnlci Ltd. - Some printers may mil support ttrtaln If-"* 

■j* Ini' \tfl\ 



Men Syticm I™ h * ifitdcmark of frofcsiloitfl Software, to 

trade markv id CommOdOFC Elcar ""' 
I Hit film tor Itugttliief IPC invited, 



M >1H1H \i JILLl *» I H 1 I If I ' J ■ I -I' l|»l""« T. II 1 " 

lect Sys&an 2 ftmcUom and 'or require an i 
Render Service No. 128 



— Cummtxlnrc fVl™ aiuHLumnurdurc t2H T%, irc 
nicrfacc. Please chrirk wtih ytpur dealer, — Healer and 



TT9 




(S®DDDDuD®(£]®[7© @ €®DDQjpS}GafeD© \?W®\p\pYJ ©DsDs ©cflw® 
One Year Warranty With Second Year Extended Warranty Available 

"Where Speed and Quality Meet" 



• SUPER HIGH SPEEP ■ SLIM LINE CONSTRUCTION (LOW PRO F I IE) 
FULLY COMMODORE COMPATIBLE • DIRECT DRIVE (DC) MOTOR • 
AVG , MTBF RATE OF 10,000 HOURS » VENTED CASE • SOLID STATE 
POWER SUPPLV • DUAL SERIAL PORT (CHAINING OPTION) « SV<" 
INDUSTRY STANDARD FORMAT ______ 

Manufactured Exclusively BY CHINON INDUSTRIES of Japan For "THE COMTEL GROUP' 



Foreign And Domestic 
Inquiries Welcome 



1651 East JEdinger Suite 209 Santa Ana, CA 92705 

Commodore* t* a Reglalefod Trademark of Commodore Bus. Machines, 



Telephone: (714) 953-6165 
Telex: 503727 



Reader Service No, 291 



THE HAUNTED CASTLE 

Variables, Strings, Arrays, and Line Numbers 



STS - Draw Stairs 
SBS - General Purpose 
TRS - Treasure Room Number 
USS - Up Staircase Room Number 
DSS - Down Staircase Room Number 
D$(x,x) ■ Draw Doors/Open Doors 
W$(x) -Draw Walls in Doorways 
S$(x) - Staircase Location on Screen 
M -ML Main Loop 
U -ML Main Loop Status Register 
Lines: 

0-15 Initialisation 
-!6 Main Loop 
17-24 Movement Between Rooms 
25-31 Movement Between Levels 
32-35 Grab Treasure 
36-38 Gost Catches Player 



A - General Purpose 

X - Piayer's X Position in Castle 
SD - Start of Sprite Definitions 

S - Start of Sprite Registers 
SO -Start or SID Chip 
SI. - ML Sprite Left Routine 
SR - ML Sprite Right Routine 
XR -6510 X Register 

P - ML Animate Player Routine 

Y - Player's Y Position in Castle 



B - General Purpose 

Z - Current Level in Castle 
TC - Number of Treasures Collccte 

C -General Purpose 

D -General Purpose 
SS -Stair Status: Up or Down 

T - General Purpose 
CL - Number of closed Exits in Room 
TR - Room Status; Treasure or Ghost 



39-65 


Set up New Room 


96-98 


Read Data 


66-75 


Initialization 


99-122 


Sprite Data 


76-78 


Found ail Treasures 


123-152 


ML Dam 


79-85 


Display Information on Screen 


153 


Clear SID Chip 


86-89 


Title Page 


154-156 


Sound Effects 


90-95 


Game Over - Player Killed 


157 


Draw Side Walls 



For all the dedicated hackers out there, I have com- 
plied all the variables, strings, arrays, and line numbers 
used by the program and supplied a short description. 

The program uses several ML routines, but they are 
all called at once by an ML Main Loop starting at 49750 
decimal (variable M). One of the routines called by the 
main loop is needed by BASIC for animation when mov- 
ing between rooms. This routine starts at 49496 {vari- 
able P). Of interest to BASIC programmers who need 
a little extra speed in their sprite programs arc the rou- 
tines at location 49176 and 49196 that move any sprite 
left or right one pixel; they even set the MSB when 
needed, Just POKE 781 with the sprite number multiplied 
by two and SYS the routine. These routines do not sup- 
port wraparound so don't let your sprites past the bor- 



ders. Also, these routines require the first 16 bytes start- 
ing at 49152. There is a sprite up routine at 49168, and 
a sprite down routine at 49172, but they would not be 
of much use simply because they wouldn't be much faster 
than an equivalent BASIC statement. However, if you do 
wish to use them, they work the same as the left/right 
routines and do support wrap-around. I am not one for 
writing neat, orderly ML code, so I extend a warning 
to all ML programmers: don't disassemble the code! It 
can get quite complex, in fact, it's a miracle some of it 
even works. 

I enjoyed writing this game, and I hope you enjoy play- 
ing it. I welcome any comments or criticism regarding 
the program. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 137 



Call us the modern way— 

on Ahoy! ' s Bulletin Board System ! 

If your comptiior >s equipped wiih a modem, you can call Ahoyfs, Bulletin Board System any hour 
Of the day. any day of the week to exchange electronic mail with other Commodore users or download' 
files like the following: 




Editorial calendar for 
upcoming issues 

Excerpts from future edi- 
tions of Scuttlebutt 



• Corrections to programs 
and articles 

• Detailed, descriptions 
■oi back issues 



• Program disk and 
subscription information 

• Classified 
advertising 



Set your modem for 300 baud, full duplex, no parity, 1 slop bit, 8-bit word length, and dial awayl 
System Configuration of Ahoy! Bulletin Board System: 



Commodore 64 
Commodore Interhailnnat 
1200 Wilson OriMB 
West Chosler. PA 19380 
Phone: 215-13i-9jOQ 


MSO SD-2 Dull Oisk Drlvp 

MSO Systems, -Inc. 

1003 1 Monroe Si roet-Sto 206 


Imp Act Printer 
. ■■ ' Fidelity Electronics, Ltd 

B800 N.W. 361h Slr'ee! 
Miami R. 33t 76 


Mltey Mo Auto Modem 

US) international- . 
7f Park Lano 
Brisbane, CA S4005 ■ 
Phone: 415-<!6B-«900 


Safcftts S C-1O0 Color Monitor 
S&fcafe U.S.A. Corporation ■ 
051 ScnpioLane 
El* Grove Village, tL 60007 
Pnone: 312-553-3211 


Vision DBS V8.3 
Vision Software Co 
PO. a;< 534 

9ion«, ny totai 

Ptionn: 21?-829-153u 


SuprrstanrJ 1 

A World ol Piawc, Ltd. 

united Lane 
Elk Grove Viilotjo, IL 6000? 
Phone: 312-880-M;:':i 


UnlKoo* C-100 

90'' ■ ooo 
Grants Pass, OR 97S26 
Phone 503-i 76-1660 


Electra Computer Pad 
Cbarleswater Prodi:. 

Street 
Weal Ncwtnn. MA 03165 
Phono: 617-964-8370 


Computer S tends *5933 4 »>u84u 

Royal Sealing Corporation 
P.O. Bo* 753 
Cameron, TX 76520 

Phone: B 1 7-US7-642 1 



CALL TODA* 71 8-383-8909 



AHOT! 63 



COMMODORE 64 
COMPUTER 

(Order Now) 

$13995 



•C128 Disks IV ea.* 

• Commodore Graphics Printer $99.95 

* 13" Zenith Color Monitor $149.95 

CALL BEFORE YOU ORDER 



COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER S139.°5 

You pay only SI 39.95 when you Older Ihe powerful 
84K COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER 1 LESS the value of 
the SPECIAL SOFTWARE DISCOUNT COUPON we pock 
wilh your computer that allows you to SAVf OVER 
S25Q olf toltwnre sole prtcnll With only ilOO ol 
savings applied your net computer coil ilS39.9S' ' 



' C1IS DOUBLE SIDED DISKS 7«' EA. 

Get Ehese 5 1 . Double Sided Floppy Disks specially 
designed for the Commodore 128 Computer (1571 Disk 
Drive; lOO'-i Certified Lifetime Warranty 
Automatic Linl Cleaning liner included. I Ban of 10 ■ 
S9.90 (99 eo .; 5 Bones ol 10 - Su SO (89' oa.) 10 
Bojiesol I0-S79. 00(79' ea.), 



13" ZENITH COLOR MONITOR » UMS 

you poy only SU9.95 when you order Ihis 13* ZENITH 
COLOR MONITOR. LESS the value at the SPECIAL 
SOFTWARE DISCOUNT COUPON we pock with your 
monitor rhof allows you lo save over S25Qof! soflware 
sole prices! I With only SIOO of savings applied, your 
net color monilor cosl is only $49.95. (Id Colon) 



SO COLUMN 
COMMODORE GRAPHICS PRINTER (99.9S 

You pay only J99.95 when you order Ihe 603 
Commodore Graphics Prinler 60 CPS, Dol Molm Qj. 
Directional. Prmls B'i" lull size paper. Plug in direct 
inlerfoce included! LESS the value of Ihe SPECIAL 
SOFTWARE DISCOUNT COUPON we pack with your 
primer that allow* yau to SAVE OVER S250 olf 
soflware sole prices'! Wilh only S100 of savings 
applied your net printer cosl is ZERO! 

4 SLOT EXPANDER tV 10 COLUMN BOARD *J9.»S 
Now you program 80 COLUMNS on the screen ol one 
time' Converts your Commodore 64 to 80 COLUMNS 
when you plug in the 80 COLUMN EXPANSION 
BOARD 1 ! PLUS 4 slot expander ! 



10 COLUMNS IN COLOR 
PAPERBACK WRITER 64 WORD PROCESSOR ««.?5 

This PAPERBACK WRITER 64 WORD PROCESSOR is Ihe 
finest available lor ihe COMMODORE 64 computer' 
The ULTIMATE FOR PROFESSIONAL Word Processing 
DISPLAYS 40 or 80 COLUMNS IN COLOR or block and 
while! Simple to operate powerlul texi ediiing, 
complete cursor and insert delete key controls line 
and paragraph insertion. automatic deletion 
centering, margin sellings ond oulput lo oil primers' 
Lis! S«9.00. SALE 13».9S, Coupon 529.95. 



COMMODORE 64 
SYSTEM SALE 



Deal 1 

Commodore G4 

Com. 1541 Disk Drive 

Com. 803 Printer 



I>eal 2 

Commodore 64 

Com. 1541 Disk Drive 

13" Zenith Color Monitor 



$ 



407 



457 



PLUS FREE $49.95 Oil Barons 
Adventure Program 



SPECIAL SOFTWARE COUPON 



ATTENTION 

Computer Clubs 

We Offer Big Volume Discounts 
CALL TODAY! 



PROTECTO WARRANTY 

All f'rolncto s products carry o minimum 90 day worranly 
II onylh.no foils wilhin 90 days from Ihe date of purchase 
simply send your product to us via United Poicol Seiy.co 
prepaid We will IMMEDIATELY send you a replacemenl ol 
no chorge via Ltniled Parcel Service prepaid. This worranly 
proves once ogam llsot We Loire Oar Customers. 



CI 28 COMMODORE 
COMPUTER 




(Order Now) 




I* LOWEST PRICES • IS DAY FREE TRIAL 
• BEST SERVICE IN U.S.A. ■ ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL 



PHONE ORDERS 

B a.m. B p m. Weekdays 
9a.m. ■ 12 noon Saturdays 



Add SI0OO lor shipping handling ond insurance. Illinois residents 
pleose add 6% to. Add 520 00 for CANADA. PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
ALASKA. APQ-FPO orders. Canadian orders musl be In U S dollars 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA 
Enclose Coshiers Check Money Order or Personal Check Allow U 
doyi lor delivery. 2 lo 7 doys for phone orders. I day eipreis mail ' 
VISA MASTERCARD COD No C O D lo Conoda APO-FPO 



n«ider Service No. J76 



Leu $30 FREE Software, your choice from 
our catalog {Seo Catalog Page 13) 

• 34DK 1571 Disk Drive $259.00 

• Voice Synthesizer S3t.9S 
•II" Amber Monitor S59.t5 

PRICES MA Y BE LOWER 




Cm COMMODORE COMPUTER $239.95 
We expeel o limited supply for Chmimos. Wo will ship 
on a ffrsi order basis. This aN-ncw revOFuiionary 12SK 
computer usos all Commodore b& soflware and 
aeeojso'ies plus all CPM program* formoMed tor ihe 
ct-sk drive Lea JJ0 fft££ Software, your choice 
from cur catalog (See Catalog Pago IJ} 
L-si $349.00. SALE»3M.I3, 

340K 1571 COMMODORE DISK DRIVE $259.00 
Double Sided, Single Disk Drive for Gr2S allow* you 
lo use C-128 mode plus CPM mode. 17 limes faster 
ih on 1541, plus runs all 1541 f of .mots 
tin 5349.00 5aJ«S259.00. 



SUPER AUTO DIAL MODEM SJ7.9J 

Easy 10 use. Just plug info your Commodore 6J 
computer ond you re ready To transmit and receive- 
messages. Easier lo use ihan dialing your lelephone. 
iusl push one key on your computer 1 Includes 
exclusive easy lo use program for up and down 
looding to prinler and disk drives. Best in U.S.A. 
LislS12°.00, SALE W.9J. 



VOIC£ SYNTHESIZER S39.«5 

Far Commodore-64 computers. Just plug it in ond you 
con program worcs ond sentences. ad|USt volume and 
pitch moke lalking adventure gomes sound oction 
gomes and cuslomued lolkres' ■ f Oft ONLY SI9.9Syou 
can add TEXT TO SPEECH. |ust lypo a word and hear 
your computer lalk ADO SOUND 10 "ZORK" SCOTT 
ADAMS AND OTHER ADVENTURE GAMES!! 
(Dilli or tope] List S8v 00. SALE 13MJ 

12" AMBER MONITOR $59.fS 
Your choice of gteen or amber screen monilor. lop 

qualify, SO columns ■ 24 Irnei easy to read anri. 
alaro 1 PIUS $9.95 for connecting coble. Com-OJ ur 
VIC 70. LislS!59.CO SALI»«.»J, 



PRINTER/TYPEWRITER COMBINATION iWM 

"JUKI" Superb leitcr quality, doisy wheel 
prinler typewriter combination Two machines in one 
- |usl a hick of Ihe switch. 12 exlra large carnage 
typewriter keyboard, automatic margin control ond 
relocole key. drop in casseltc ribhom (90 day 
warranty) cenironics parallel or HS332 serial port buili 
in (Specify) List %W> 00 SALE I24MS, (ltd.Qty.) 

13" RGB & COMPOSITE COLOR MONITOR S1S1.9S 
Musi be used to get 80 columns in color with 80 
column computers (CI 28 . IBM- Applet. 
(Add S14. 50 shipping: 
LislS3««.00 SALE«S9.»5, 



• TO DAT FREE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 
• OVER 500 PROGRAMS • FREE CATALOGS 



We Love Our Customers 

Box 550. Barrington, Illinois 60010 

312/382-5244 to order 



GIANT PRINTER SALE!! 



List $399.00 



E 



M79 



10" Printer 

001 



E 



I Year Warranty 

120-140 CPS 

Premium Quality 



10" Comstar 10X - This Bi-directional 
Tractor/Friction Printer prints 
standard sheet B%"xll ,% paper and 
continuous forms or labels. High 
resolution bit image graphics, 
underlining, horizontal tab setting, true 
lower descenders, with super scripts and 
subscripts, prints standard pica, 
compressed, expanded, block graphics, 
etc. Fantastic value. (Centronics 
parallel interface, i 
List $M9. 00. Sale $179.(10. 



List $499.00 



10" Printer 



$ 



E 



229 



00 



E 



7 Year Warranty 

150-170 CPS 

High Speed 



1(1" Comstar 160+ High Speed - This 

Bi-directional Tractor/Friction Printer 
combines the above features of the 10" 
Comstar 10X with speed (150-170 cps) 
and durability. Plus you get a 2K buffer. 
96 user definable characters, super- 
density bit image graphics, and square 
print pins for clearer, more legible print 
(near letter quality). This is the best 
value for a rugged dependable printer, 
(Centronics parallel interface. ) 
List $490.00. Sale $229.00. 




List $599.00 



TO" Printer 



$ 259 



00 



E 



Lifetime warranty* 

165-185 CPS 

High Speed & Letter Quality 



10" Comstar 2000 - The ultimate printer 
has arrived! This Bi-directional 
Tractor/Friction Printer gives you all 
the' features of the Comstar 160 plus 
higher speed 1 165-185 cps), 256 
downloadable characters, proportional 
setting, external dark printing mode and 
a 'lifetime printhead warranty. PLCS ... 




List $599.00 15%" Printer 

»$44A00 



E 



239 



E 




15'/ 2 " Comstar 15X - Has all the 
features of the 10" Comstar 10X plus a 
wider 15%" carriage and more powerful 
electronics to handle large ledger 
business forms! (Better than FX-100). 
The 15%" Comstar 15X also prints on 
standard size paper and continuous 
forms and labels. Fantastic value. 
(Centronics parallel interface.) 
List $599.00. Sale $239.00. 



List $699.00 15%" Printer 



$ 



E 



289 



00 



s 



E 



l. r >i/ 2 " Comstar 100+ High Speed - This 
Bi-directional Tractor/Friction Printer 
has all the features of the 10" Comstar 
160+ High Speed plus a wider 15%" 
carriage and the heavy duty electronics 
required for today's business loads. You 
can use large ledger business forms as 
well as standard sheets and continuous 
forms and labels. This is the best wide 
carriage printer in the U.S.A. 
(Centronics parallel interface.) 
List $699.00. Sale $289.00, 



List $599.00 



10" Printer 



$ 259 



00 



With the flip of a switch you can go into 
the letter quality mode which makes all 
your printing look like it came off a 
typewriter. Turn in term papers, do 
articles or just print programs. Have the 
best of letter quality and speed in one 
package. Fantastic printer (Centronics 
parallel interface.) 
List S599.00. Sale $259.00. 



• 15 Day Free Trial — I 



Commodore -64, VIC 20 - $39.00 



Year Immediate Replacement Warranty 
Parallel Interfaces ' 

Atari — $59.00 Apple II, II + , He - $59.00 



Add $10.00 (Jld SO lor 15'." Printers) lor shipping', handling ond 
insurance, Illinois residems please add 6°* tax. Add S70.O0 for 
CANADA. PUERTO RICO HAWAII. ALASKA. APO-FPO orders 
Canodion orders musi be in U.S. dollars. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO 
OTHER COUNTRIES. EXCEPT CANADA 

Enclose Cashiers Check, Money Order or Personal Check. Allow Id 
days lor delivery. 2 to 7 days lor phone orders I day express mail i 
VISA MASTERCARD COO. No CO D. 10 Canada APO FPO 



Wc Dove Our Customers 

22292 N, Pepper Rd.. Barrington, Illinois 60010 

312/382-5244 to order 



Render Service No. 276 



Commodore 64 



■ e gg: 



MODEM 



Commodore 64 





List S99.00 M m List S99.00 

Sale ^mf^ m : P^g ^ Sale 

$4V95 ( Telecommunications J $4V95 

Coupon $32.95 LoWGSl^PHc g f fT-ffie U>$ LA. Coupon $32.95 



FOR CHILDREN ADULTS- BUSINESS 




Complete Auto Dial 
Telecommunications Package 

The only telecommunications package you will ever need." 

(Exclusive Easy To Use Features) 



VIEWTRON 



\$> W Ifefl ■ ■mWI^JMEMBERSHIP 

* Only Good Color Graphic Database Service in the U.S.A. (C-64) 

Viewtron Software Plus First Hour FREE (See the Protecto Software Catalog On-Line) S9.95 value 

• 300 Baud Modem • Auto Dial • Auto Answer • Upload & Download 

Reach Out and Access Someone 

• Educational courses • News Updates and Information 

• Financial Information • Popular Games • Electronic Shopping 

• Banking at Home • Research and Reference Materials 
The Complete Telecommunications Package offers you all this plus ... 

• Auto Log-on . Stores on Disk Downloaded Files 

• Dialing from Keyboard • Reods Files from Disk and Uploads Text or Program Files 
On-line Clock • Select Any Protocol (access almost any computer or modem) 

• Capture and Display High Resolution Characters • Plus Much, Much More 

• Download Text, Program or Data Files -^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

-» . 50 TF95 Coupon $32.95 

List 599.00 Sale ^9 m 

We are so sure this is the only telecommunications package you will need we will give you 15 days Free Trial. 
Viewtron Membership sold separately — $9.95. 



Add S3 00 for shipping handling and insurance Illinois residents 
please add 6°, tax Add 56 00 for CANADA PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
ALASKA APOFPO orders Canadian orders must be in U S dollars 
WE DO NOt EXPORT TOOTHER COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA 
Enclose Cashiers Check Money Order or Perianal Chock Allow M 
nays lor delivery 7 To 7 days for phone orders I day express mail » 
VISA MA5TERCARD COD. 

NoCOD loConodo APOFPO 



We Love Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd. Bornngton Illinois 60010 

312/382-5244 to order 



Reader Service No. 276 



1 



COLOR MONITOR 

SALE!!! 




(Premium Quality) 

* Built in Speaker and 
Audio 

* Front Panel Controls 

* For Video Recorders 

* For Small Business 
Computers 

* Apple - Commodore - 
Atari - Franklin - etc. 






(Premium Quality) 

Beautiful Color 
Contrast 

High Resolution 

Separated Video 

Sharp Clear Text 

Anti-Glare Screen 

40 Columns x 24 Lines 

Supports 80 Columns 

Sottwrin special $19 ?5C 138 coble. 



13" Color Computer Monitor 

'C64 CI 28 connecting cable $9. 95 Cq I {-*. 



List $329 00 
$ 



159 95 



Add $1 4.50 Shipping 

*259 9 * 



Sale 



IBM, C-128, 
Apple, Atari ST 

13" RGB & COMPOSITE COLOR MONITOR 

Allows use of C-128 and C64 mode - composite ond 80 column RGB 

mode. Must be used to get 00 columns in color with 80 column List *J".UU 

computers (IBM, C- 128, Apple & Atari ST), (odd SI 4.50 shipping) . ri 28 RGB cable SI 9 95 

13" ZENITH COLOR MONITOR 

(add $14, 50 shipping) List S299.00 

15 Day Free Trial - 90 Day immediate Replacement Warranty 



Sale s 149 95 



12" XTRON SUPER HI-RESOLUTION MONITOR 



-. ...^hh*— «^.«,- Sale $ 109 

Super-Clear "Easy to Read" text with special anti-glare screen! (Lid. Oly.) List S249.00 



95 



ft*/™ HI-RESOLUTION GREEN OR AMBER TEXT DISPLAY MONITOR 



80 Columns x 24 Lines, Hi-Resolulion, crisp clear eosy to 
road text with antiglare screen! A MUST for word processing. (Lid, Oty ) 



List $199.00 



List S159.00 



Sale *89 95 
Sale s 59 95 



12" AMBER MONITOR 

80 Columns x 24 Lines, eosy to read up front controls (Ltd. Qiy.) 

' C64/C1 28 connecting cable $9.95 

'LOWEST PRICES ' BEST SERVICE IN U.S.A. • ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL * OVER 506 PROGRAMS * FREE CATALOGS 



Add SIQOQ tor flipping Kood'inq oml insurant,- Illinois residents 
nli-asi- odd 6*. 1a» Atiii ' $70.00 foi CANADA PUERtORICQ HAWAII. 
ALASKA APO IPO order-, Canadian orders must be in U S dollars 
WE DO NOt EXPORT TO 01 HER COUNTRIES iXCEPl CANADA 
Inclose Cashiers Chock Money Order or Personal Check. Allow M 
days tot delivery 7 To 7 days tor phone orders 1 day express mail ' 
VISA MASTER CARD COD 

NoCOD lo Canada APOFPO 



Wf LiOtic Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd.. Barnngton Illinois 60010 

312/382-5244 to order 



Reader Service No. 27fl 



FLOPPY DISKS SALE *59* ea. 
Economy Model or C-i 28 Cadillac Quality 

We have the lowest prices! 



*ECONOMY DISKS 










For 


use with Commodore 


64, 


At 


3ri. Apple. 


Good quality 5%" single sided double 


density 


with hub 


rings. 










Bulk Poc lOOQly. 






59 : 


ea. 




Total Price 






S59.00 


Box w/ sleeves lOQty, 






7 o« 


ea. 




Total Price 






7.90 



■/'t C-128 Computer Disks -A- 

CADILLAC QUALITY (Double Sided, Double Density) Specifically designed for use with C-128 

• Each disk certified • Free replacement lifetime warranty * Automatic dust remover • Works with IBM PC 

For those who want cadilfac quality we have the C-128 Floppy Disk. Used by professionals because they con rely onC-3 28 Disks lo store 
importont data and programs without leor of loss! Each C-128 disk is 100°; certified (on exclusive process) plus each disk carries an 
exclusive FREE REPLACEMENT LIFETIME WARRANTY. WithC-128 disks you con hove the peace of mind without the frustration of progrom 
loss after hours spent in progrom development. 

100% CERTIFICATION TEST 

Some floppy disk manufactures only sample lest on o batch basis the disks they sell, and (hen claim they are certified. Each C-128 disk is 
individually checked so you will never experience data or progrom loss during your lifetime! 

FREE REPLACEMENT LIFETIME WARRANTY 

We are so sure of C-128 Disks that we give you a free replacement warranty ogainst failure to perform due 10 faulty materials or 
workmanship for as long os you own your C-12B disk, 

AUTOMATIC DUST REMOVER 

Just like a record noodle, disk drive heads must travel hundreds of miles over disk surfaces. Unlike other floppy disks the C-128 smooth 
surface finish saves disk drive head wear during the life of the disk. (A rough surface will grind your disk drive head like sondpapcr) 
The lint free outomatic CLEANING LINER makes sure the disk-kilters (dust 8 dirt) are being constantly cleaned while the disk is being 
operated c _ ^ D/j|f5 ^ defi „ Jte f y , fte Corf/ // oc dUk }„ fhe woHd 

Just to prove it even further, we ore offering these supe r LOW INTRODUCTORY PRICES 
1 Box of 10 - $9.90 [W ea.) 5 Boxes of 10 - $44.50 (89* ea.) 10 Boxes of 10 - $79.00 (79' ea.) 

All disks come with hub rings and sleeves in an attractive package. 

DISK DRIVE CLEANER $19.95 

Everyone Needs A Disk Drive Doctor 
FACTS 

• 60% of all drive downtime is directly reloled lo poorly 
maintained drives. 

• Drives should be cleaned each week regardless ol use. 
■ Drives ore sensitive lo smoke dust S all micro panicles. 

• Sysiemalic operator performed maintenance is the best 
woy of ensuring error free use of your compuler system. 

MEW RSI-SMARTCARE HEAD CLEANING KIT 
WITH FREE LIBRARY CASE! 

Improper maintenance can cause costly 
road write errors on your disk drive, Regutor 

cleaning of heads is essential for maintaining RSI-COMPLETE PERSONAL COMPUTER CARE KIT! 

high quality operation and eliminating expensive T ' le RSI Complete Personal Computer Care Kit contains everylhing you need to 

downtime and repairs. The RSI-Smartcare Dry properly maintain your compuler system. This easy to use kit makes necessary 

Process Head Cleaning Kit provides proper computer core quick and inexpensive. In one convenient package you will get all 

maintenance without the mess. Simply insert the me necessary products S'A" Dry Process Head Cleaning Disk (Good for 15 

cleaning, disk into the drive and activate for 30 'borough cleanings): Anti-Static Spray (Eliminates static build-up. For use on 

seconds. This kit contains 1 -open ended disk car P e, $. clothes, paper, gloss, hard surfaces, ond other moterial): Screen- 

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cleonings, Applicable lor both single and double " reen5 ond keyboards): Linl-Free Cloths (Non-scratch, nan-abrasive, used tor 

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Render Service No. 278 



KNOCKOUT 



For the C-64 

By Tony Brantner 



Knockout is a boxing simulation which lets 
you step into the ring and slug it out with a 
human or computer opponent without even 
getting your hair mussed. 
After running the program, the opening screen prompt 
will ask you to select either the one- or two-player ver- 
sion of the game. If you press "1" you will be given a 
choice of two skill levels. Level One offers a solid chal- 
lenge to the amateur fighter, and a good sparring part- 
ner for the more experienced. Level Two is definitely 
for pros only. 

You will now be shown an overhead display of the ring, 
with the fighter in white controlled by a joystick plugged 
into port 2 and the fighter in black controlled by either 
a joystick plugged into port 1 or the computer. As soon 
as you hear the opening bell, come out fighting. Moving 
the joystick moves your fighter in the corresponding di- 



rection, while pressing the fire button makes him throw 
a punch. You have two minutes to try to outscore your 
opponent by landing more punches, with the time elapsed 
within the round displayed just above the ring. You will 
receive one point for each shot you land. If you get 100 
points, the match will be stopped and you will be awarded 
a technical knockout. Once the match has ended, press 
the f7 key to either defend your crown or try to avenge 
your loss. 

Just like in real boxing, your best strategy is to "bob 
and weave," backing away from your opponent's punch- 
es and countering with your own. Trying to "brawl" your 
way through a match by forcing your punches can result 
in a humiliating loss. Don't dance around the ring too 
much though, or you'll find yourself on the ropes fight- 
ing for your life! □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 140 



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70 AHOY! 



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All CSM products are available from your local dealer 

Reader Service No. 2fiS 




M M W paceships are our favorite lixxl —and 

mm mm ^ we are getting hungry." These are the 

|H words that greet you on the title 
" screen of The Martian Monsters, a 
game for the Commodore 64. After the title screen, a 
random starfield is drawn with the surface of the planet 
Mars on the bottom of the screen. A multicolored space- 
craft attempts a landing when suddenly a swarm of mon- 
sters begins an attack. You have live ships at your dis- 
posal, but you'll need them all, because these pesky lit- 
tle creatures eat spaceships. 

Hitting the monsters with your laser gains you points, 
while a monster catching you gets you gobbled up for 
lunch. If you miss the monsters when you fire your la- 
ser, all five of them will stop and laugh. Five misses with 
your laser will end the game. Losing all of your ships 
will also end the game. 

Your spaceship is constantly moving horizontally across 
the screen. You control vertical movement by pushing 
the joystick up or down. Pressing the fire button fires 
your laser. 

STRATEGY 

Hitting a monster with the laser will blow him up. But 
he rejuvenates himself almost instantly. Thus, if you fire 
at a monster when he is very close to you. he may come 
back to gobble you up if you're not fast enough with the 
joystick. Sometimes it is better to fly around and wait 

72 AHOY! 



for a safe shot, but this increases the risk of a monster 
sneaking up on you and having a light snack. 

AN ILLUSION OF SPEED 

Things seem to move pretty fast in outer space. A short 
machine language routine (lines 5000-5230) causes the 
screen to scroll. The main loop (lines 850-970) keeps 
your spaceship Hying horizontally and contains the joy- 
stick routine which allows you to control vertical move- 
ment. A machine language interrupt routine moves all 
of the sprites except your spaceship. This routine, like 
all interrupts on the 64. is read every l/60th of a sec- 
ond. The machine language routines allow the main loop 
to be tightened up, creating a faster game and allowing 
error-free collision detecting. If your program does not 
have to read as many POKEs and PEEKs, then it can 
read your collision routines faster. When combining 
BASIC with machine language, the SYS command is of- 
ten used. In this program SYS 49152 calls for the scroll- 
ing routine and SYS 51104 sets the sprite movement rou- 
tine in motion. 

Thus, the machine language routines scroll the screen 
and move the sprites, and the BASIC main loop moves 
your spaceship. You have monsters moving all over, your 
spaceship constantly in motion, a laser being fired, and 
the screen moving. You have an illusion of great speed. 
This illusion is very important in many arcade-type com- 
puter games, especially those written in BASIC. 



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Reader Service No. 112 



AUDITIONING THE ACTORS 

The five monsters are sprites. Initially they are all the 
same shape. Each monster sprite is a different color. The 
spaceship is a multicolored sprite (red, white, and blue). 
The laser beam is also a sprite. 

The characters in a game need personality. The mons- 
ters, by their shape and color, appear "cute," which is 
what I wanted. By "quoting" the monsters through the 
use of several messages, a mischievous mood is created. 
The whining sound on the title screen also adds to the 
monsters' personally, as this is their voice. While data 
is being read by the computer a message declares that 
the monsters "are building up an appetite." When the game 
is over, the monsters appear onscreen gloating with a 
friendly message. 

The monsters go through changes as the game is 
played. If you miss a shot, all the monsters expand, turn 
sideways, and "laugh" (lines 2500-2550). Lines 3000-3270 
allow the monsters to gobble you up if they collide with 
you. Your ship explodes and the monsters cats up the 
remains. 

EATING A SPACESHIP 

As mentioned, part of the monsters' personality is 
shown through different shapes and animation. The main 
loop (lines 850-970) checks each of the live monsters for 
a collision with the spaceship. If there is a collision the 
program branches to the "eating" subroutine (lines 3000- 
3270). The appropriate monster (found by giving variable 
Q the appropriate memory location for the sprite) is ex- 
panded horizontally and vertically by POKEing (V+23) 
and (V+29) with the appropriate values. The monster's 
shape is altered by continually POKEing different point- 
ers in the sprites memory location. 

For example, sprite #2 is one of the monsters. The orig- 
inal pointers are set by POKEing 2042,192. All the mon- 
sters start out with their memory locations being POKEd 
with 192. Sprite ft! is expanded vertically by POKEing 
V+23,4 and expanded horizontally by POKEing V+29,4. 
The shape of the sprite is changed by POKEing location 
2042 with values 195 and 196. This creates a "Hip page" 
animation effect. Using a variable speeds things up — in 
this case variable Q for the sprite memory location and 
variable P for the sprite pointer. The following chart 
illustrates how this animation effect is used in Die Martian 
Monsters: 



Q=2042 


(Sprite memory location lor sprite #2) 


P=195 


(Pointer where sprite data pattern shows the 




Martian with his mouth closed) 




(Pointer l°fi shows the same pose, but with 




the mouth open) 


For T=l TO 8 


(How many limes ihe Martian opens and 




closes his mouth) 


POKE Q.P 


(Changes the Martian's shape to mouth 




closed) 




(Changes the Martian's shape to mouth open 




when P=196) 


P=P + 1; If P=197 


(Changes P from 195 to 196. then back to 195) 


then P=195 




Next T 


(Completes the loop for 8 "Shewing cycles") 



Since the collision routine in the main loop gives the 
memory location for the particular monster involved, the 
sprite retains its own color and position. A similar rou- 
tine occurs when a missed shot happens, only rather than 
just one, all five monsters laugh using the same sprite 
pointers used for "eating." When hit by a laser, sprite 
pointer 197, a picture of an explosion, is POKEd into 
the monster's memory location. After a split second, his 
original shape is restored by POKEing 192 back into his 
memory location. Sprite pointer 197 is also used when 
the spaceship collides with a Martian monster. 

SOUNDS 

Sound adds a great deal of feeling to a game. In Hie 
Martian Monsters, sound also helps add to the monsters' 
personality. The different sounds of a monster eating and 
being hit lets you know what is happening in a game. 
The whining noise at the beginning and end of the game 
is actually the monsters' voice. 

The sounds in Tfte Martian Monsters change when you 
do not have control of the joystick- that is, outside of 
the main loop. This eliminates a slowdown in the game. 
This also allows for more elaborate sound, A monster 
can take his time eating your spaceship, since there is 
nothing you can do about it. 

AVOIDING THE SEAM 

Let's get back to the illusion of speed. The 64 has a 
seam in the screen approximately J A of the way across. 
The joystick routine which allows you to control verti- 
cal movement and the routine in the main loop which 
moves your ship horizontally are written in BASIC. To 
move the spaceship across the seam would require an 
additional line in the main loop (POKE V=16,l; POKE 
V+0,X). This line would permit horizontal movement 
across the seam. The addition of any extra lines slows 
down the game. To avoid having to contend with the 
seam, the portion of the screen to the right of the seam 
is used for displaying the title, score, ships, and missed 
shots. Thus, the game is not slowed down any more than 
it has to be. The machine language scrolling routine does 
not scroll this part of the screen. 

SUMMARY 

Mechanics are important in any type of programming. 
The program must do what you want it to. But in a game 
program other factors are equally if not more important. 

You must be a magician or storyteller. You must quick- 
ly create characters and situations that are interesting and 
visually appealing. You are creating pictures and a mood. 
You are affecting the feelings of the person playing your 
game. 

You must create a grand illusion with POKE and PEEK. 
At the conclusion of the game, when the "play again" 
option is displayed, you want the player to press "Y". Then 
you know that your illusion was a success. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 120 



74 AHOY! 



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Why waste time typing? 
All the programs in this 
issue of Ahoy! are avail- 
able on disk or cas- 
sette! Use the cou- 
i pon below to order a 
single disk or tape 
or a subscription... 
as well as the spe- 
cial disks de- 



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(Postage and Handling Included) U.S.A. CANADA ELSEWHERE 

Q January '86 Ahoyl Disk $ zg5 $ 12 9S $ 13 95 

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ART GALLERY DISK SALE 

An Gallery images are available on disk. High resolution 
bit-mapped images are available in DOODLE! format. Multi- 
color bit-mapped images are available in Koala format. Each 
disk includes a slide show program for easy viewing. DOO- 
DLE! disks include a bit map screen dump utility for the 1525 
or properly interfaced dot matrix printer. Koala disks include 
a set of custom routines for bidirectional conversion to other 
multicolor formats. The conversion routines were expressly 
developed for the Art Gallery by Michael Beutjer of K.T. 
Software, author of the Koala Printer program and Quad Print 
(June '85 Ahoy!). Formats presently supported are Cadpic, 
Peripheral Vision, Riint Magic, and Flying Colors. Disks are 
available for $15 from Morton Kevclson, P.O. Box 260, Home- 
crest Station, Brooklyn, NY U229. Send a stamped and self-ad- 
dressed envelope for a complete lisiing. 



Contributors to Ahoy! s An Gallery will receive royalties based 

on the sale of disks. Send your best work on disk, accompan- 
ied by a stamped and self-addressed mailer, to Morton Kevcl- 
son, P.O. Box 260, Homecrest Station, Brooklyn, NY 11229. 
Indicate the drawing package that was used to create the im- 
age. If you employ a bit map of your own design, indicate 
the appropriate file parameters, i.e., hi-res or multicolor, lo- 
cation of bit map, screen or color data. 









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As you read these words, it's early De- 

■ v>] eember. But as we write them, it's early October 

—hence our Columbus Day-inspired An Gallery salute 

to Italians and Italian-Americans, Steven Distasio's detailed 

DOODLE! images, Venice Church and Italian Church, demonstrate 

the maximum resolution of the C-64's 320 x 200 pixel hi-rcs graphics mode. 

Space! and Bridge were created with Koala Painter on the Koala Pad by A 1 be no 

Valsccchi of Milano, Italy- definitely a New Renaissance artist of the highest order. Saluting 

the great astronomer Galileo and forming the background for this month's images is Comet 

by Scan Huxtcr (Springdale, NF). who made his Art Gallery debut last month. The image 

is shown unobscurcd at lower left. 




---'■' 



—^^^^-.— 



r>i=ymwfi 



DATA MANAGER 128 

SWIFTCALC 128 
WORD WRITER 128 

Timeworks, Inc. 
Commodore 128 
Disk; $69.95 each 

Timeworks' word processor, spread- 
sheet, and database programs, their 
first for the 128, are the equal of any 
Fve seen. The three have many features 
in common, so I'll enumerate these, 
then get down to each one's strengths 
and (almost non- existent) weaknesses. 

The good news starts as soon as 
you open the packages. A toll-free 
hotline number is printed on the in- 
side front cover of the documentation 
for each program. The support per- 
son I spoke with knew the systems 
and said that she uses them exclu- 
sively. 

At this writing, the programs work 
only in the 128 80-column mode. For 
those used to a 40-column character 
set, the 80 columns can produce 
splitting headaches within a short 
time. This is especially true if a 
monitor has any flicker to it at all. 
By the time this article sees print, 
Timeworks will be offering 40- and 
80-column versions of Word Writer 
on the same disk. While going back 
and forth between the two will re- 
quire reloading the appropriate ver- 
sion of the software, it will give the 
user a choice. 

Because of the difficulty of getting 
all the necessary information on a 40- 
column screen, Data Manager and 
SwiftCak will be available only in 80- 
column mode. Timeworks is planning 
to redesign these packages to run in 80 
columns with the 1702 using the video 
out port, so a special cable connecting 
the RGBI port won't be necessary. 

The documentation for each program 
is outstanding. An alphabetic glossary 
of terms at the beginning of each man- 
ual telis you what they're talking about 
in advance. A tutorial in the early pag- 
es teaches you how the main features 
of the program work. In each, you cre- 

78 AHOY! 



Timeworks' 
128 versions 
of their 
spreadsheet, 
word process- 
ing, and data- 
base programs 
can share data 
with minimal 
inconvenience. 
READER 
SERVICE 
NO. 129 



ate a sample that with a little modifi- 
cation could actually be used for a pur- 
pose. Sample files are included on the 
disk and the manual is sprinkled with 
examples. A "facts at your fingertips" 
section in the back has a condensed 
version of the information found else- 
where, for those who like to just dive 
in and deal with problems when they 
arise. A section on troubleshooting and 
error messages can really help when 
things don't seem to be working right. 

All three programs use a Macin- 
toshlike menu bar and "pull-down" 
menus. Hitting the 128's escape key 
(ESC) puts the menu bar across the 
top of the screen. The arrow keys are 
used to highlight the option you want 
to use. Hitting the return key pulls 
down the menu so you can see what 
options arc available. Again, the ar- 
row keys are used to highlight the op- 
tion you want. The RETURN key 
picks the option. 

For instance, printing information 
with your printer requires choosing 
the print option in the menu bar. This 
calls up a sub-menu with the option 
to print on the screen or your print- 
er. When you've made that choice a 
group of questions helps determine 
how your printout will look. After the 
questions are answered your docu- 
ment is printed. This is a very effec- 
tive way for new users to work with 
a program because the computer 
prompts for all the information it 
needs to complete the action you ini- 




tiate. However, as users gain experi- 
ence with a program, menus can be- 
come cumbersome. I understand that 
the programs will soon include key- 
stroke commands to use as alterna- 
tives to the menus. 

The three programs include a "repeat 
the last command used" feature, so that 
you don't have to keep pulling down the 
menus to reuse a command. 

All three programs include print 
drivers that will work with most of the 
commonly marketed printers and in- 
terfaces. They all have provisions for 
modifying the print control codes that 
are sent to the printer, so special fonts 
and sizes of type can be adjusted. All 
contain an option to designate the third ' 
number used in the printer "OPEN" 
command, as well as toggling the 
ASCII correction on or off. 

As with previous Timeworks pack- 
ages, the three programs can share 
files. Programs are included to cre- 
ate files that can be read by the other 
modules, making it possible to trans- 
fer data from the spreadsheet to a 
word processing document or from 
the data manager to the spreadsheet, 
etc. The word processor has a pull 
down calculator that easily puts the 
results of your calculations right into 
the document you're editing. The 
database program allows number 
fields and calculation fields that can 
include logic operators and "IF- 
THEN-ELSE" statements. The data- 
base will also create graphs of those 



calculations or number fields (much 
like Lotus 1-2-3 does for IBM users). 
SwiftCalc also graphs data for you 
and includes "IF-THEN-ELSE" 
operators. 

The Word Writer program has most 
of the features that make a good word 
processor, including some of the most 
versatile cursor movement keys I've 
seen. The only movement command 
missing is backward or forward one 
word. Formatting of information in 
a document is relatively simple. 
Many format commands are in the 
print menu and do not have to be in- 
serted into the document. A reformat 
command is included to handle 
changing margins mid-document or 
for an alternate printout. 

A page break display is provided 
to show where each new page starts. 
Word wrap and insert are included; 
however, the insert is not an on/off 
toggle. Instead you must insert a 
character or line at a time. The de- 
lete functions are well planned and 
include delete character, word, or 
line. You can also delete a block of 
text or the remainder of a file. 

Another nice feature is the memory 
remaining command. Since Time- 
works chose to limit the size of docu- 
ments to 64K, it's always reassuring 
to be able to check the space left. A 
more realistic document size limita- 
tion that you should keep in mind is 
the spelling checker's limit of 10 pag- 
es of text. Linking documents re- 
quires a bit of manual labor. Instead 
of inserting commands to load new 
modules automatically, the writer 
must print the first, load the second, 
print the second, load the next, and 
so forth. Unless a reset command is 
used to prevent it, each new docu- 
ment loaded in is treated as an ex- 
tension of the last. The reset func- 
tion puts the page number back to one. 

The spelling checker takes about 
the same amount of time as others 
and will make corrections in the doc- 
ument. It is easy to use and fairly for- 
giving. Its dictionary is not too ex- 
tensive, but you can add a supple- 
mentary dictionary of words you use 
that aren't in the main one. 

SwiftCalc has most of the features of 
Lotus 1-2-3, and Timeworks plans to 



LET THE 

GAMES BEGIN 




Animated color graphics, 
music ond sound effecrs 
create exciting entertain- 
ment thot thrills the senses 
Ride the winds on your 
magic carpet with RUG 
RIDER. Grow in strength 
and power as you prepare 
for the confrontation with 
rhe Evil Genie. 
ENTERTAINER I provides a 
collection of fun, from 
defending the city from 
dreaded Trobots. ro pilor- 
ing your Starship through 
intergalacric space, ro finding ond destroying the Evil Warlord's nuclear reactor. 
Aspiring weather newsmen con begin leorning tneir trade with SNOWDRIFTS 6 SUNNY 
SKIES. Predict tomorrows weather, using the weother folklore, terminology, historical 
partetns, ond weather mop found in the Mam Room. 

Meet the challenges of COROM o graphic adventure Yout mission is to rescue the fair 
princess from the evil sorcerer, defeormg moorugs. monsrers. groggs. and other 
obstacles, on your way to viaory 

Thinkers with a sense of humor will enjoy GHOST TOWN, specially designed for the Plus 
A". As a graduore parapsychology srudenr. your ossignmenr is ro quier the spmrs who 
haunt rhe town of Rosed ale. 

Come experience rhe rhnll of victory, the enjoyable agony of defeat with Tri Micro 
entertain mem. 

For Ifx- CM" C 126" aid Plum" 

fo< more information on whore 'o buv tn M>:ra sotrwaie cail (7 1 4} A3 2- 6 70 7. 

I KlfcS/VllC-.fvO P.O Bex 1 1300 Sonro Ana CA 9271 1 



HOW TO 
TAME YOUR INFORMATION 

TEAM-MATE, WRITE FILE, ond HOME OFFICE 
ore fully integrated software programs 
designed ro monage your data so you 

con whip thousands of names ond 
numbers into shape. 

Use the word processor ro move a 

paragraph or rronsfer text from file ro 
file. You con even generate a form and 
customize ir by merging information from 
rhe tile manager or by merging 
spreadsheer numbers. 

Monitor your budget, cash flow, and invesr- 
ments wirh rhe spreadsheet, Use if to help 
plan shopping and coupon use- 
Keep on top of appointments, criricol 

dotes and events wirh the 

file manager. Let ir help 

you organize inventories, research nores, or family 

healrh records. 

PLUS GRAPH creates pie charts, line graphs or bor graphs 
ro Hlusrrote rrends. market share, and profitability. 

You'll see rhar the performance, qualiry. and price will 
help you rome the facts with ease. 

T-f-» I » ■ iy*r»if-\ ror rr,e 064". C-tIG"*, P(u5 4" ond Man" 

1 KIfc«»lVlll_KvJ' P.O. Don 1 1300. Soma Ana CA v27l 1 
For more information on where to buy Tri Micro Software (714) 832-6707, 





Raider StrvFcs No. 116 



AHOY! 79 



'PlayNET 

$2.75* an HOUR! 

PlayNET takes you and your whole family far beyond play. 
At $2.75 per hour it's the lowest cost way for everyone to 
enjoy full color telecommunications. 



With your Commodore 64/128/ 
SX and your modem you can 
meet the experts, participate in 
on-line talk snows, and meet thou- 
sands of people with your interests 



fH,*** Up- *»< 



' , K, 



Kit )*■■ HIM .► 

■■:'<■ .'it | 



B*h, 7«m t*-i fin J T"( 1lV#r 



Waif T R*l|« r «*i°f*** 



MII4 tvrjN' 1 ,<iii nt y«w 

< I *- I. .-.,.. r ,, i *M1 iff kiW 



There are many features of PlayNET, here are only a few! 



You can post announcements, join 
in the excitement of many Special 
Interest Groups, get all the latest 
information on the C-128 and 
Amiga. Communicate with peo- 
ple from all over the country! 





m^m i \ 




i »rt 


t "" 


BUJU* t«*t* 1 


































-J 

1|B MM 


P 



The Software Delivery Service 
has a Trading Post for selling 
self-written software and a Pub- 
lic Domain Library where thou- 
sands of programs are available 
on-line. 



JMHSDFTUREGka 
££■ DGLIFE E?y ^ 
^SGfciriCG m 




PlayNET also provides 14 full-color games you play 
with other peoplel You can even talk with your opponent. 
Games include: Backgammon, 
Boxes, Bridge, Capture the Flag, 
Checkers, Chess, Chinese Check- 
ers, 4 in a Row, Go, Gomoku, 
Hangman, Quad 64™, Reversi, 
Sea Strike™. 



*As a member you'll receive a membership kit (regularly 
$19.95) and then pay only $2.75 per on-line hour and $8/ 
month account maintenance fee. 



PlayNET operates weekdays 
from 6 PM locally until 
7 AM Eastern lima, 24 hrs. 
Sat/Sun/Most Holidays 



CALL 1-800-PLAYNET TO BECOME A MEMBER. 




add more. While it will currently ereate 
simple graphs of data, soon more com- 
plicated illustrations will be possible. 

Cells arc initially fixed at a given 
size, but can be adjusted to new 
widths as data is being entered. Cells 
can contain numerical data, labels, 
text, or formulas that reveal results 
of calculations. These formulas can 
contain up to 240 characters and use 
the cell names as variables. For in- 
stance, adding the first three cells in 
column one would be done by speci- 
fying a cell as a formula cell and en- 
tering its contents as A1+A2+A3. 
The numbers' appearance, whether or 
not to include dollar signs, and num- 
ber of decimal places are easily ad- 
justed. Scientific notation can be used 
if you prefer. 

SwifiCalc has an automatic calcu- 
lation feature that causes all formu- 
las to be reevaluated each time a cell's 
contents are changed. While this is 
ideal for smaller spreadsheets, the re- 
calculations can take much longer for 
more complex or lengthy forms. 
Since the C-64 can't handle data in- 
put while it is calculating, the wait 
can be annoying while you are man- 
ipulating the numbers. SwifiCalc has 
a feature to turn the recalculation off, 
A separate command is included to 
"force" the calculation manually. This 
is a real time saver. 

SwifiCalc has features that you 
would find in a word processor, as 
well. You can add, delete, move, or 
copy cells, rows, or columns, or 
blocks of cells. You can also search 
or search and replace. Believe it or 
not, you can even set tab stops. A 
GOTO command lets you access any 
cell instantly. 

Commands are also provided to 
check the amount of memory left and 
to freeze a row or column. The freeze 
command lets you keep your label 
fields on the screen, while helps pre- 
vent losing your place. 

In addition to processing user-de- 
fined formulas, SwifiCalc has some 
built-in functions that are very use- 
ful. These include the minimum, 
maximum, and average value of a 
range, sum or value count of a range, 
absolute or integer value of a cell, and 
the present and future value of a dol- 



80 AHOY! 



REVIEWS 



lar or an annuity. These functions can 
be used within your formulas. 

SwifiCalcs documentation includes 
extensive explanations of how to use 
these formulas and functions to their 
maximum and numerous examples 
which arc included in the sample 
spreadsheets on the disk. 

Like SmftCalc, Data Manager al- 
lows you to use calculations with the 
data that you enter: not as complex 
as those in SwiftCalc, but perfect !y 
adequate for a program that is in- 
tended to organize data rather than 
manipulate it. 

Data Manager's manual gives a 
great set of instructions on how to set 
up your database. Once it is set up. 
the features to enter and organize the 
information are simple and effective. 
Special programs to sort and search 
arc included, making it easy to iso- 
late parts of your database to print or 
copy out to another 11 le. The report 
writer (which is reached through the 
pull-down menus) makes it easy to 
print reports or labels. 

The initial ization procedure for set- 
ting up your database is simple and 
uses onscreen layout. Your layout can 
contain multiple pages and titles be 
printed or omitted. By properly set- 
ting up the database initially, anyone 
can sit down and start entering infor- 
mation. A function is even included 
to allow you to add new fields to the 
database after it's been created and 
data has been entered. Although new 
fields can only be added at the end 
of the existing form, this is vastly su- 
perior to having to redefine the entire 
form and reenter all of the previous 
information. 

Written especially for the 128. all 
three programs reviewed make good 
use of the added memory and ex- 
panded keyboard. 

Timeworks. 444 Lake Cook Road. 
Dcerrield. IL 60015 (phone: 312- 
948-9200). -Cheryl Peterson 

PLAYNET 

C-64 

Starter Kit $39.95 (see below) 

The people who run Play NET like 
to refer to their system as "the net- 
work that has people talking," Those 
of you who have not tried the system 



A PlayNET membership kit 

is yours free with a 

one-year subscription 

to i\hoy! 

For $19.95 you'll receive 12 issues of Ahoy!, PlayNET mem- 
bership kit ($19.95 value), and the following services avail- 
able only through PlayNET: 



• The Ahoy/ Port of Call, a week- 
ly teleconference with Afioy/'s 
writers and editors 

• Downloading of Ahoy.' pro- 
grams at a nominal fee 



LB f 


> -j&n 


-.& 






• Discount prices on Ahoy! disks 
and back issues 

• Multiuser access to Aboyl Bul- 
letin Board 



Don't have a modem? PlayNET will give you one free! 
Take advantage of our $19.95 Ahoyl! Play NET offer, 
and agree to subscribe fo 
PlayNET for three monfhs, and 
you'll receive a free auto dial/auto 
answer modem right now! The fa- 
mous make, touch tone or rotary 
capable modem carries a 90 day 
warranty. 



~ Sond me 12 issuei of Ahoyl Enclosed ij my cheek or money order, payable to Ion Interna- 
tional Inc., for S19.95 ($26.95 Canada and elsewhere). Also, lign me up lo PlayNET* 
For one month, and tend me the membership kit [519,95 value) free of charge. 

In addition, I agroe to subscribe to PlayNET* for three months. Send me my free auto 
dial/ auto answer modem now. 

'As o PloyNET member I will be billed on my credit card S2.75 per on-line hourand SB. 00 
per month account maintenance fee. I can cancel my membership at any time by writing by 
PlayNET, but if I receive a modem and cancel before 90 days I will be billed S44.Q0. 




NAME 

ADDRESS- 
CITY 



TELEPHONE 

Circle One: MC/VISA Card #_ 
Expiration Date 

Signature. 



_5TATE_ 



MP. 



.Date. 



SEND TO: Aboyl 45 West 34th St., New York, NY 10001 



AHOY! 81 



HOW TO GET 
OVER $2000 WORTH OF NEW 
CAPABILITIES FOR YOUR 
COM 



e^ss: 



mm 




/ 



OR $599 



The Spartan'" is the Apple'" If I emulator for your Commodore 64'" that will open 

up a whole new world of hardware and software for youl Imagine adding these 
features to your Commodore 64'" for the Spartan'" price of $599: □ Apple '"(J + 
hardware and software capabilities Q 64K RAM expansion □ four 
software selectable Commodore 64 '" cartridge slots □ non-dedicated 8-bit 
parallel port □ standard audio cassette deck capabilities for your C-64'". 
The suggested retail value of comparable products offering only these 
capabilities is over S2200.00* — but the Spartan'" gives you much, much 
morel By building on your investment in your Commodore 64'"— an 
excellent introductory computer — you create a whole new system 
with both C-64'" and Apple'" II + capabilities. There is a whole other 
world out there! The huge selection of Apple'" Jl 4 hardware and 
software is now yours to explore! Call toil free for the Spartan'" 

dealer nearest you. ] 



FOR INFORMATION WRITE: 

MIMIC SYSTEMS INC. 
1112 FORT ST., FL. 6S 
VICTORIA, B.C. 
CANADA V8V 4V2 



"All pclcs % quoted aie In U 5 fundi. frcJTjhl and lanes not included Value of coroponanli equivalani 
to ttnj Sporran * iyii<.-m ore quoted from Apple" II ■* CPU orxl Apple ~ II * ungle disk ddvo 10ft J 
litl price*, and from current uiu/rjmtad ''Si price* and componenl spocihcDltom Of Other 
peripheral mariufocfuren Commodof a M ' cw>d Cornrpodof o togo aw ftadjumorits of 
Commodore Elwstronlci ltd and or Commodore Buyrwn Machinery Inc Appto " II + Is a 
ii' i' :•■! nort ol Apple Computer Inc Spaiian • li a tradiomoik ol Mimic Syttorm Inc and has 
no Qjsactonart with Commodore Neuronics oi Applo Computer Inc The Spartan " Is 
manutaclured by Mlmta Systorm Inc under Ncenvo rjronlec) by ATG ticcftonLci Inc of 

Victoria, ft C Canada 



TO ORDER CALL 

1-800-MODULAR 

(663-6527) 

■ HMder Semico No. 109 



might dismiss that slogan as typical 
marketing hype. If so, you would be 
missing out on one of the best val- 
ues around for Commodore users. 
PlayNET really does have people 
talking! All kinds of people, from all 
around the country. 

What arc they talking about? Just 
about any topic you can imagine, 
from accounting tips to zucchini rec- 
ipes and anything in between. They 
do this through the use of a function 
called "People, Games & More," 
which gives users from the smallest 
towns to the largest cities a place to 
meet and talk with each other and 
even play games together. The "Peo- 
ple, Games & More" section of Play- 
NET is divided into electronic 
"rooms" that can each hold a dozen 
users at one time. There are several 
standard public rooms that are open 
to all users, called reception rooms. 
Although they are not only public 
rooms, these reception rooms provide 
a starting point for your electronic 
journey across the nation. By switch- 
ing from one room to another you 
might discover a conversation about 
children's books or a weekly meet- 
ing of computer bulletin board sys- 
tem operators from major cities 
across the country. And if you don't 
find the conversation you're looking 
for you can start your own room sim- 
ply by going to it. You can even start 
a private room where only those peo- 
ple you've invited can join you. 

Another nice feature of the Play- 
NET system is the ability to send on- 
line messages or electronic mail to 
any other person on the system. Mes- 
sages are delivered to the user in sec- 
onds wherever they might be on the 
system. If that person is not signed 
on when you want to send your mes- 
sage, you can leave electronic mail 
that will be waiting for them the next 
time they log on. And PlayNET is 
more than just talk. It's also games: 
games that you play against a real hu- 
man, not a computer. Strategy games 
such as Chess, Checkers, Backgam- 
mon, and Capture the Flag; word 
games like Hangman; and card 
games such as Contract Bridge. In all 
there are 14 different games on the 
PlayNET system. 



REVIEWS 



PlayNET also supports a wide va- 
riety of computer bulletin boards. 
Here, PlayNET subscribers can leave 
messages and trade information with 
other users about such topics as cur- 
rent events, arts and entertainment, 
hobbies and sports, and many others. 
Classified advertisements are also 
available. 

Another interesting area is the 
PlayNET Shopping Center. Here 
PlayNET users may purchase a num- 
ber of different items such as Play- 
NET T-shirts and key rings and vari- 
ous books and magazines. This area 
is currently being expanded and will 
soon be offering a much wider range 
of products and services. 

The Software Delivery Service of 
the PlayNET system is an online area 
where subscribers can freely trade 
programs that they have written or 
public domain software obtained 
from other sources. There are three 
different ways of using the PlayNET 
Software Delivery Service: 

1) The Personal File Transfer area 
is where one subscriber uploads a file 
to PlayNET. The file is then held for 
two days. During that two-day peri- 
od the file is available to any other 
subscriber who knows the filename 
and the name of the person who up- 
loaded it. There is a small fee for 
downloading one of these files. 

2) The Software Trading Post is 
where members may buy or sell soft- 
ware that they, or other users, have 
written. When a program is upload- 
ed to this area, it is made available 
to other users at the price specified. 
If another user purchases the pro- 
gram, the price is deducted from that 
user's account and added to yours. 

3) The Public Domain Software 
Library is where any PlayNET user 
may upload or download public do- 
main software. There is no fee 
charged for uploading, but a down- 
loaded program will cost you 50 cents. 

Each PlayNET Master Account 
has (he option of creating up to ten 
additional sub-accounts, the first five 
of which are free. There is a small 
fce for each sub-account after that. 
Sub-accounts allow each family 
member to have his own individual 
account number and password, as 




;ader service index 



page Cum pan) 



Su-. \n. 



21 


Abacus Software 


108 


7,1 


Ahfltus Noflware 


112 


25 


VEiln's Hi sroiml Soltsvare 


278 


i -j 


Amu Software 


142 


48 


Vi..l:nl. 


244 


110* 


Ac* Nollwarc 


."«! 


54 


Aeliiisloti 


150 


14 


Alsof! 


12J 


101 


Anierkun Intl. Computer Products 


M> 


97 


\ooimoit Software 


11.1 


?l 


Artwiiec 


249 


4> 


lii^ I 1 keironics 


IK) 


17 


llrorirrtHintl Soflwarc 


104 


11 


CBS Software 


271 


II 


i lis Softmin 


272 


11 


CBS Software 


273 


11 


Central lliint Sollwarr 


201 


2.1 


ChrrMiert Product* Inc. 


- 


DMfett 


CompuServe 


264 


tis 


Computer Outers or America 


107 


CJ 


Computer Ik.uf International 


257 


87 


Cumputer Friends 


US 


109 


Computer Manantfnstnt Corp. 


»2 


46 


CuiTm In i". 


289 


1? 


1'SM SmIiu.h. 


266 


71 


1 SM Software 


2*5 


MM 


CYC Online 


297 


5.1 


Dili has! 


251 


lit* 


Dfaital Vhfctt, Int. 


WIJ 


47 


1 kill link Arts 


242 


96 


Fleclrouic (hie 


29» 


47 


FP>i 


245 


48 


Kp i \ 


245 


51 


First Suit Soflnyre 


251 


».* 


Flopps House Soli ware 


279 


49 


Gamestar 


247 


51 


fiatneslar 


250 


16 


<le«Srr Fduc+itioriiit Soflwart 


1,17 


III 


Howard VI. Sains & Co., Inc. 


270 


VI 


Ilinn.m 1 n-irii ctcd SiiII'lhv 


115 


105 


Imagea-iire 


117 


107 


1 ntc|Jr.iteii -Soil w a re S We ins 


;.-x 


n 


Jason-HaElheEiti 


lit 


105 


Jason-itatiheim 


116 


.1.1 


John Henn .Software 


122 


56,57 


Ljco Computer 


III 


86 


Mackk Enterprises 


U4 


9 


MegaSnfl Limited 


268 


sm 


MeuuSnfE Limited 


292 


94 


VlfcrocQmKftbc 


101 


55 


vlu rut i-.imti- Sport* Association 


29.1 


J I 


MicroPros,. Siriiiil.i[c..n So||„. ln 


247 


102 


Mil loi.itiim, lnltiniiEioii.il 


281 


12 


MM west Software 


1.12 


82 


Mhnk Sislrms Inc. 


109 


C-2 


Mi ml snipe, hie. 


277 


26 


N Si stems- 


290 


99 


Ohio Computer Semee-s, Inc. 


298 


14 


ran lie Mien? Ine. 


275 


10* 


Plirscc Research 


118 


16 


Phoenk Arisinc 


124 


MJ&tU 


H.nNTI 


- 


hi 


Professional Software. Inc. 


128 


n 


Professor Jones 


286 


64 d9 


Pnitceto KnlrrprUECs 


276 


16 


: In. i inn hi. r -i ill- .. 


126 


45 


ItJ. Ilrueluiiitn Assoelalcs, Inc. 


121 


.12 


ttcii .in ?i in S'pi . i. Ii J i v liunl- . ■ . Ine. 


253 


7 


KtiKer \V'4Hncr Publications 


LV) 


71) 


Schncdlcr Skeins 


_ 


85 


Solid Sltile Software 


131 


f> 


-■I -i ji.'iril '-.ii '.■..!:. 


281 


48 


Straterfic Sin] aim ions Inc. 


246 


8 


SubUKJIC ' -I ii.ir.iii..:, 


269 


22 


SohLIKilC Cor ptrull nil 


256 


18 


TAt> Software 


14) 


.12 


Ttilktrorilc*. hie. 


254 


.'7 


Tulklrouks, hie. 


255 


47 


'the Avfllori Hill fifllne Com puns 


241 


ti2 


T he ' ■M-.ir, 1 1 ,| ,.|i|; 


291 


.15 


THFi MICRC1M1NT, INC 


260 


78 


Timewnrks, hie. 


lit 


79 


hi Micro 


119 


1.1 


Tripp Lift 


274 


24 


Oralis It 


29S 


;; 


I niiersal Marketing 


!27 


105 


\ii Ills-Soft 


288 


114.115 


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88 


VMC Software 


14(1 


181 


Wedgwood Ki nl.il 


294 


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AHOY! 


83 



well as individual onscreen name. 
Sub-account charges are automatical- 
ly added to the master account for 
billing at the end of each month, and 
each sub-account may have a differ- 
ent credit limit attached to it. This 
allows the holder of the master ac- 
count to create separate accounts for 
each person in the family without fear 
of running over budget. Just give the 
kids a monthly Play NET allowance 
and turn them loose. Complete and 
comprehensive billing information is 
always available online, and you can 
even sign up a friend while online. 
For individuals without children, the 
sub-accounts allow multiple person- 
alities online and PlayNET makes it 
simple to switch accounts without the 
need to logoff and sign back on. 

In general, I have found PlayNET 
users to be just about the friendliest 
group of people around. Dropping 
into a reception room is sure to bring 
a chorus of hellos from the occu- 
pants, even if they are complete 
strangers. There is an overwhelming 
family feeling at work on this system 
that makes many other networks 
seem cold and impersonal by com- 
parison. PlayNET supports and en- 
courages this feeling by sponsoring 
many monthly events and activities. 
Special Interest Groups (SIGS) 
abound on PlayNET, with such sub- 
jects as life-sharing and Physical dis- 
abilities appearing alongside poetry 
readings and comic books. 

There is certainly something for 
everyone on this system. In fact, I 
have only found two aspects of the 
PlayNET system disagreeable. The 
first is that it takes so long for the 
software to load when going from one 
area of the system to another. This 
is not a fault of PlayNET's but rather 
due to the slowness of the 1541 disk 
drive. Although the PlayNET soft- 
ware is not copyprotected, most fast 
loader programs will not work with 
it. The only fast loader that will func- 
tion reliably is 1541 Flash from 
Skyles Electric Works. PlayNET is 
aware of this problem, though, and 
have told me that by the time you are 
reading this review they will have in- 
corporated their own fast loader into 
the software. My second complaint 

84 AHOY! 



with PlayNET is that they are only 
open from 6 p.m. local time to 7 a.m. 
eastern time, and 24 hours on week- 
ends. 

The suggested retail price of the 
PlayNET package is $39.95, and con- 
nection charges are S2.75 per hour 
with an $8.00 monthly service charge. 
You may sign up by calling 1-800- 
PLAYNET and tell them Captain B 
sent you . Please feel free to drop me 
a line any time you're on the system. 

PlayNET Inc., 200 Jordan Road, 
Troy, NY 12180 (phone: 518- 
283-8682 or 1-800~PL AYNET) . 

-B.W Behling 

1541 DISK DRIVE ALIGNMENT 
PROGRAM, VERSION 2.0 
CSM Software, Inc. 
Commodore 64 and 1541 
Disk; $44.95 

Alignment, or more precisely the 
lack of it, is an affliction which many 
1541 disk drive users arc all too fa- 
miliar with. Disk drive misalignment 
results from a combination of factors. 
The early versions of the 1541 were 
more apt to suffer from misalign- 
ment, due to a design deficiency in 
a critical part of the hardware. This 
was further aggravated by the "head 
bump" error checking used by early 
software protection schemes. Interest- 
ingly enough, we have found that 
Commodore was one of the worst of- 
fenders with regard to this type of 
primitive copy protection. 

Although the 154 l's hardware has 
been improved and copy protection no 
longer needs to perform a head bump, 
the disk drive may stdl need to be 
aligned from time to time. Some nor- 
mal disk operations, such as format- 
ting a disk, will cause a head bump. 
Many of the old protection schemes are 
also still around. Even with the most 
solidly constructed 1541, long hours of 
use will eventually necessitate adjust- 
ment of its mechanism. 

The symptoms of disk drive mis- 
alignment are easily recognized. In 
its most severe form, all commercial 
software (which was presumably 
manufactured on properly aligned 
hardware) will refuse to load. If the 
drive is allowed to attain this sorry 
condition, other problems will mani- 



fest themselves. The most aggrava- 
ting of these is the inability to read 
disks which were previously format- 
ted on the same disk drive. The irony 
of this problem is that once the of- 
fending drive is properly aligned, 
your most recently formatted disks 
will become unreadable. The only 
solution is to copy these disks to a 
second aligned disk drive before re- 
aligning the first. 

Fortunately, there is no need to al- 
low matters to reach this deplorable 
state. The early symptoms of mis- 
alignment can be easily recognized 
by the alert user. At first a slight in- 
crease in the loading times of com- 
mercial software may become evident . 
This will shortly be augmented by an 
intermittent flickering of the disk 
drive's error light. In the advanced 
stages, the drive will seem to detect 
numerous disk errors. The resulting 
proliferation of "head bumps" serves 
to accelerate the process to the point 
where commercial software will not 
load at all. Very often many of these 
symptoms are mistakenly assumed to 
be the fault of the program disk rath- 
er than a problem widi the disk drive. 
In the most extreme case the stepper 
motor cam will slip an entire track, 
effectively bringing the drive back 
into alignment. Unfortunately, this 
condition is only temporary. 

For most users, disk drive mis- 
alignment will mean a trip to a qual- 
ified service technician. Use of the 
electronic instruments required is be- 
yond the knowledge of the average 
user. The 1541 Disk Drive Alignment 
Program by T N. Simstad aims to 
eliminate the need for any electron- 
ic expertise from the alignment pro- 
cedure, at the cost of a single qual- 
ified service call. The process is re- 
duced to the execution of a purely 
mechanical series of operations. Of 
course, the ability to load the align- 
ment program and use the computer 
is also required. 

What is required of the user is a 
fairly good mechanical aptitude. The 
accompanying manual does provide 
step by step instructions, as well as 
prolix descriptions of the events in 
question. Unfortunately, the accom- 
panying sketches provide only the es- 



REVIEWS 



scnlial information as referred to by 
the text. Your own imagination will 
be required to bridge the gap from 
the physical presence of your disas- 
sembled drive to the primitive draw- 
ings in the manual - an exercise not 
made any easier hy the three physical 
and electronic variations which have 
come about as the 1541 has evolved. 

In addition to the manual, the 
package includes two disks: the align- 
ment software and a precisely format- 
ted alignment disk. Neither of these 
disks can be copied, although one set 
of backup copies is available for $15. 
The first disk is protected by some 
rather sophisticated copy protection 
schemes. Of course, copying the sec- 
ond disk would only negate the value 
of the original's precision. 

The directory of the program disk 
may be viewed, but not LOADcd and 
LISTed, using the DOS wedge on the 
1541 test demo disk. Doing so reveals 
a copyright notice, some apparently 
humorous comments, and a tongue- 
in-cheek challenge to copy the disk. 
We suppose this goes hand in hand 
with T, N. Stmstad's and CSM's other 
products, in particular Hie Program 
Protection Manual For the C-64, Vol- 
umes I and II. These books include 
detailed discussions on the various 
forms of hardware and software pro- 
tection used by software manufactur- 
ers for the C-64. We can only con- 
clude that the protection on this disk 
must be some form of final exam for 
these volumes. However, instructions 
for the grading of your results were 
not included. 

Operation of the program is 
straightforward, although loading it 
may present a problem. The complex 
copy protection and the expected sor- 
ry state of your disk drive may con- 
spire against the successful booting 
of the package. In the worst case a 
second disk drive may have to be 
called into service. This may require 
some swapping of disk drives, as the 
program will only boot from device 
eight. However, once loaded, the 
alignment may be performed on disk 
drives with any legitimate device 
number. You may also have to dis- 
connect any other serial bus devic- 
es, as the copy protection scheme is 



# SOFT WARE ^ 
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The only other comparable producl would 
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AHOY Jul/ B5 

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INFO 6'i Magazine. Issue »7 

"Vizastar is an exceptional package that 
rivals the leatures ot programs such as 
Lolus 1 -2-3 and otters C6* owners the kind 

ol integrated software previously only 
available lor higher-priced systems." 

RUN Magazine. June 1985 

l scrutinized, tested and experimented with 
Vizastar extensively, but could lind no 
weaknesses whatsoever It is the most 
comprehensive, most flexible, most powerful 
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package I've worked with." 
Commodore Microcomputer, Sept Oct 1985 

I use an IBM PC at work with Lotus 123. I 
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Steven Roberson. NC End User 

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menus, lull-function calculator and 
more. Up to 8 newspaper-style' 
variable-width columns can help with 
newsletters 

Three different proportionally-spaced 
"near letter quality" fonts are also 
built-in for use with Commodore or 
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merge almost any other word 
processor file directly into Vizawrite, 
including Paper Clip and Omniwriter. 
Naturally, it is also compatible with 
Vizastar. At all times, what you see on 
ihe screen is exactly the way it will be 
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PROGRAM SPECIFICATIONS 

Both Vizawrite and Vizastar are 
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includes a 50 page tutorial book. Both 
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Render Service No. 131 



AHOY! 85 



sensitive to these otherwise innoc- 
uous intruders. 

A number one Phillips head screw- 
driver, in very good condition, is also 
required. We have found the stepper 
motor hold down screws to be very 
tight on most 1541 disk drives. Us- 
ing a worn screwdriver will chew up 
the head, requiring heroic measures 
to undo the damage. 

The alignment program provides 
several menu selections. Speed accur- 
acy is important to disk drive opera- 
tion. The actual drive speed is dis- 
played and continuously updated as 
a percentage of the proper speed. Ad- 
justment can be easily made in real 
time. You will need a formatted 
"scratch" (i.e., no valuable data) disk 
ibr this purpose. The main menu has 
a format disk option which interest- 
ingly enough refused to format an un- 
formatted disk. On the other hand, 
a preformatted disk formatted just 
fine. This is clearly a utility of futil- 
ity. Just remember to format a disk 
before you start. The two-minute boot 
time of the alignment program is not 
to be taken lightly. 



Two alignment checks are provid- 
ed. The coarse adjustment sets the 
read/write head over track one. The 
head stepper motor must then be set 
to center the head between the alter- 
nate positions of noticeable disk drive 
error. This is the point where the disk 
error light just begins to flicker. The 
proper position is then determined by 
rocking the stepper motor between 
these two points. 

The fine adjustment process is far 
more critical and lime consuming. A 
total of nine tracks are cyclically 
scanned by the program. Although the 
readability of each track is noted, it is 
the timing of the entire cycle which is 
important. The objective is to minimize 
the time it takes to run a cycle check. 
Since each cycle takes at least 30 sec- 
onds, this iterative process can become 
lengthy, in particular towards the end 
when the setting of the stepper motor 
is somewhat touchy. 

In addition to the head alignment, 
the track one stop must be properly 
set. Failure to do so will cause the 
drive to have difficulties in format- 
ting a disk. The symptom of an im- 




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86 AHOY! 



Reader Service Ho. 134 



properly set stop is the inability of 
the drive to read track one on a disk 
which it had just formatted. The set- 
ting of the track one stop is purely 
mechanical. The program positions 
the head over track one and requires 
the stop to be adjusted within .006 to 
.01 inch of the stepper motor cam. 
The hard part is the lack of any re- 
fined adjustment mechanism on the 
disk drive itself. Most 154l's have a 
single screw holding down the track 
one stop. Tightening this screw invar- 
iably upsets the stop's position. As a 
result, the whole procedure becomes 
somewhat hit or miss. Fortunately, the 
track one stop rarely needs adjustment. 

As a last resort, the manual ad- 
dresses the underlying cause of disk 
drive misalignment. The earliest 
1541's are the ones most likely to suf- 
fer from this fault. Once the drive 
loses alignment there is an increased 
tendency for misalignment to reoc- 
cur. The manual recommends what 
we believe to be the only truly effec- 
tive cure, pinning the stepper motor 
pulley to its drive shaft. Unfortunate- 
ly, the precise drilling of a hole through 
this miniature shaft requires a rather 
specialized set of tools and skills. 

Overall the 1541 Disk Drive Align- 
ment Program offers a viable, pure- 
ly mechanical alternative to a fully 
instrumented disk drive alignment. 
The program also offers a fast and ef- 
fective means of periodically check- 
ing the disk drives speed and align- 
ment. However, a full alignment us- 
ing the CSM method will take long- 
er than a "traditional" calibration with 
proper test instruments. A descrip- 
tion of at least one instrumental align- 
ment should have been included as 
an option for the qualified user. 

CSM Software. Inc., P.O. Box 563, 
Crown Point, IN 46307 (phone: 219- 
663-4335). —Morton Kevehon 

SUPERF0RTH 64 

Parser. Research 
Commodore 64 
Disk; $99.00 

SUPERFORTH 64 is my fifth. My 
fifth review of a version of the 
FORTH language, that is. Writing re- 
views is usually like Christmas -tear 
off the wrapping and play with a new 



toy. I have to admit that my heart 
dropped when I realized that writing 
this review was going to seem like 
deja vu. 

You see, FORTH as a generic com- 
puter language has some pretty well- 
recognized standards. True, there are 
a couple of variations on the theme, 
but FORTHs are typically much 
more similar to one another than are, 
say, BASICs. I didn't initially see how 
reviewing SUPERFORTH 64 would 
involve much more than checking it 
against the standards and then trying 
to find an interesting way to tell you 
how different FORTH is from other 
computer languages, in both style and 
power. 

Parsec Research had a few surpris- 
es for me, however, and I ended up 
having balls of fun and getting back 
into FORTH more than I had been 
in years. (Yes, I used to and still oc- 
casionally do program in FORTH. It 
is much faster than BASIC and it re- 
inforces some good programming 
habits.) 

Programming in FORTH forces 
you to structure your thinking and 
your code. Imagine a BASIC pro- 
gram that is totally modular, with the 
modules loosely strung together. The 
main body of that BASIC program 
might look like: 

10 GOSUB 1000 
20 GOSUB 2000 
30 GOSUB 3000 
40 GOSUB 4000 

Each line in the main body might, 
in turn, direct you to another series 
of modules until you finally reach 
small blocks of free-standing code. 
Those blocks are FORTH words. 
Words in FORTH are compiled into 
a collection called the dictionary. A 
word in the dictionary may be noth- 
ing more than a series of other words 
linked together. 

FORTH code is organized into 
physical and logical screens, essen- 
tially computer screen fu Is of code. 
Source code screens are loaded into 
the system and compiled before they 
can be used. Once compiled, a 
source word can be called interactive- 
ly or used in the definition of a new 



REVIEWS 



word. SUPERFORTH 64 includes a 
decompiler, a trace facility, and a 
non-destructive stack dump, all to 
ease your debugging efforts. 

FORTH's stand-alone words force 
your programming into a linear style 
and make debugging oh-so-easy. But 
what's special about SUPERFORTH 
64, you ask? Well, it contains all the 
words required by the FORTH-79 
standard and a bunch of those defined 
by the FIG (FORTH Interest Group) 
FORTH standard. It is actually a su- 
perset of the MVP-FORTH system. 
(I told you it follows the standards — 
as do all versions of FORTH.) 

But SUPERFORTH 64 goes beyond 
the other FORTHs Fve used by giving 
you lots more words to start with. 
The predefined word set includes 
(bear with me here!): 15 editor, 13 
source screen file mode, 8 byte/bit 
manipulation, 26 I/O, 11 Kernal in- 
terface, 36 utility (including backup), 
50 graphics, 33 Turtle graphics, 23 
sound, 11 music editor, 20 string ex- 
tension, 6 interrupt, 4 display, 4 high 
RAM access, 2 array, 9 floating 
point, and 6 trig words. (Total 262.) 

Furthermore, SUPERFORTH 64 
gives you an extension package for 
floating point math, with support for 
either decimal or scientific notation 
form. And it gives you words to man- 
ipulate two- or multi-dimensional 
matrixes. And an algebraic expres- 
sion evaluated, so you do not have to 
work in FORTH's standard Reverse 
Polish Notation (where 2 + 2 is writ- 
ten 2 2+). And an RS-232 word set. 
And a printer/plotter word set, for the 
1525 and 1520. And even a couple of 
Koala pad utility words. 

This is like buying BASIC and re- 
ceiving several disks full of powerful 
subroutines and utilities thrown into the 
bargain. SUPERFORTH 64 does, by 
the way come on four disks -actually, 
on both sides of each of two disks. With 
all the extension packages and the 
source code, there's a lot to learn here. 
Although FORTH is about as different 
from other computer languages as it 
can be. this SUPERFORTH 64 package 
is just waiting for you to jump in and 
use its power. 

If all that is not enough, you even 
get the chance to dabble in artificial 



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Render Ssrvlco No- 135 



AHOY! 87 



REVIEWS 



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Render Service No. 113 



intelligence. A program called EX- 
PERTS, written in FORTH, is pro- 
vided as an inference machine. EX- 
PERT-2 is primarily a learning tool 
dial allows you to compile expert rule 
programs and to perform logical in- 
ferences on these rules. 

Your EXPERT-2 programs can have 
two components -a set of If-And- 
Then rules to manipulate truth val- 
ues and a set of analytical subrou- 
tines. Playing with EXPERT-2 can 
give you some good insights into hu- 
man reasoning that is based on rec- 
ognizing and sorting patterns to form 
the types of "rules" we each use daily. 
Eight example programs are includ- 
ed on the disk to show you how to 
use rules to do such things as predict 
the weather or analyze a digital 
circuit. 

The only language you are likely 
to have used that is faster than 
FORTH is assembly language. If you 
are familiar with assembly language, 
SUPERFORTH 64 will accommodate 
you. It contains an integrated assem- 
bler that will allow you to rewrite 
time-critical FORTH words to run in 
machine language. FORTH assembly 
code looks much like 6502 assembly 
code, except that FORTH's structured 
approach is maintained so 6502 
branching commands are not includ- 
ed. If you have written your own as- 
sembly language routines, SUPER- 
FORTH 64 will allow you to use them 
after going through a simple conver- 
sion process. 

SUPERFORTH 64 includes 500 pag- 
es of manual and tutorial materials just 
to cover the basics. The printed mate- 
rials specifically do not cover in de- 
tail FORTH programming or artificial 
intelligence. Plan to buy one of the 
standard texts on these topics. Parscc 
does reference many good books, in- 
cluding all the standard FORTH pro- 
gramming and reference guides. 

To help you get started, and assum- 
ing that most of us are familiar with 
BASIC, Parsec has included a BASIC 
to FORTH command translation tabic. 
It won't help you understand the 
structural differences between the 
languages, but it will make the vo- 
cabulary meaningful. And right there 
on page one of the manual, Parsec 



lists its address and phone and invites 
us to report problems, ask questions, 
and give user feedback. 

Parsec Research, Drawer 1766, 
Fremont, CA 94538 (phone: 415- 
65 1-3 160) . - Richard Herring 

BLUE CHIP D12/10 
DAISY WHEEL PRINTER 
Blue Chip Electronics, Inc. 
Price: $249.00 

The Blue Chip D12/10 is a low-cost 
daisy wheel printer intended for 
home applications. It cannot be said 
that it is the best performing printer 
ever released, but it has to be looked 
at from a home market point of view. 

I found the D 12/10 virtually iden- 
tical in performance to the Brother 
HR-15. This is no surprise, for the 
D12/10 is manufactured by Brother. 
As a matter of fact, the rear of the 
printer is stamped Brother HR-10. 

Print speed is a lethargic 12 char- 
acters per second. This is slow, but 
bearable. Additionally, there is a 2K 
buffer that will free your computer 
while the printer is busy. 

The print qualify is in line with 
other printers of this type. It's clear 
and aligned well, making it quite ac- 
ceptable for most home applications. 
Any of the standard Brother daisy 
wheels will work with the printer, 
giving the user a wide variety of fonts 
to choose from. 

The DL2/10 has the ability to perform 
an assortment of tricks. These include 
automatic underlining, strikeout, sha- 
dow print, and double strike. It can also 
move the carriage in 1/120" increments 
for precise alignment of text. 

Interfacing is achieved through a 
standard Centronics parallel port. In 
order to connect it to your Commo- 
dore you must purchase the proper 
interface. As this is not a dot matrix 
printer, and thus incapable of repro- 
ducing onscreen graphics, the least 
expensive, non-graphic interface 
should suffice. 

The Blue Chip D12/10 isn't going 
to win any awards, but for home use 
should be more than adequate. 

Blue Chip Electronics, Inc. , 2 West 
Alameda Drive, Tempe, AZ 85282 
(phone: 602-829-7217). 

—David Barron 



88 AHOY! 



MICROSIM 



A Flight Simulator for the C-64 

By Tim Gerchmez 



I was inspired to write Microsim when I purchased 
a commercial flight simulator package for the 
C-64. I had never before realized just how exciting 
it was to fly -the feelings of freedom and power 
are fantastic. This flight simulator is not as realistic as 
others available commercially. It is written in BASIC, 
which means that several things had to be sacrificed. Mi- 
crosim is meant for entertainment purposes only: it is 
not intended to simulate any particular real aircraft. Please 
do not assume that because something works a particular 
way in Microsim, that's the way it works in real flight 
(though that may be the case). Also, please realize that 
Microsim is not a teaching tool -if you want to learn to 
fly an aircraft, be sure you lake real flight lessons with 
a certified flight instructor. 

To use Microsim, type it in and SAVE it. When you 
first RUN the program, the instruments will zero them- 
selves out, and the cabin of the plane will pressurize. 
Following prcssurization, you will hear two bumps sig- 
nifying that the plane has landed. From here on you are 
in control. 

Microsim uses keyboard input to control its instruments. 
First of all, let's go over these controls. The plus and 
minus keys control the engine RPM's (indicated by the 
ERPM indicator). Pressing plus speeds up the engine 
and minus slows it down. The minus key also acts as 
a brake for the aircraft when on the ground. 

The greater than and less than keys ( > and < ) 
control the rudder, which steers the aircraft. You can use 
these keys either shifted or unshifted. ( will bank the air- 
craft left, and ) will bank it right. The HEADING indi- 
cator shows the current compass heading of the aircraft, 
and the BANK INDICATOR (indicated by BI > on the 
screen) shows which way the aircrat is banking. Imag- 
ine the BANK INDICATOR to be a view of the aircraft 
from the rear. 

The U and D keys move the aircraft's ELEVATORS 
up or down, respectively. When the ELEV. indicator 
reads a positive number, the elevator is up from center. 
This tends to pull the nose of the aircraft up. When the 
indicator reads below zero, the aircraft will tend to pitch 
downward. The elevator can therefore be used to control 
the plane's altitude. 

Pressing R or L will Raise or Lower the plane's FLAPS. 
The flaps work along with the elevator to help control 
the plane's altitude. In Microsim, the flaps should be down 
when taking off, and up when landing. 

Press H to "hear" ATIS (Automatic Terminal Infor- 
mation Service). ATIS will display the current tempera- 
ture, barometric pressure, and visibility conditions. It will 



also display the total number of nautical miles your air- 
craft has traveled since you booted the simulator (or since 
your last crash). This is indicated on the screen as TNMT 
(Total Nautical Miles Traveled). 

Pressing the X key will refuel the aircraft. You have 
two fuel tanks available, the "green" tank and the "red" 
tank. Both tanks will be refueled with this command. 
This keypress works on the ground only (ever heard of 
a floating gas station?). 

The number keys 1-4 control the indicators labeled 1-4 
in the lower right corner of the instrument panel. These 
instruments will be covered shortly. 

Pressing the key will toggle between day and night 
flying. The program starts out in day flying mode. In 
Microsim, the only difference between Hying in the day 
and flying at night is the "color of the air." 

Finally, pressing the O key will cause the simulator 
to take an automatic demonstration flight. This command 
will be covered further in a while. 



KEY CONTROL QUICK REFERENCE 




+ - 

> < 

U D 

R L 

H 

X 

O 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 




Throttle controls 

Rudder controls 

Elevator controls 

Raise/ Lower flaps 

Hear Terminal Informatii 

Refuel aircraft 

Demo mode 

Toggle day/night flying situation 

Raise/lower landing gear 

Set fuel mixture 

Carb heal on/off 

Select fuel tank 

Lighting on/off 

Air conditioning on/off 

Cabin heating on/off 




Now let's discuss some of the instrumentation not al- 
ready covered. The TIME display shows a real time clock 
that is reset to zero each time you take off. Thus it indi- 
cates total time in the air. The GROUNDSPEED indi- 
cator measures the speed of your aircraft while on the 
ground. The FUEL and OIL TEMP, gauges are pretty 
much self-explanatory. The light with the P under it turns 
red when the cabin is pressurizing. The STALL WARN- 
ING LIGHT turns on when the plane drops to within 
5 MPH of" stalling in the air. If this light turns red, you 
should either decrease your elevator or speed up the en- 
gine. The altimeter displays the current altitude of your 
aircraft above ground level. 

There are 4 instruments to the lower right of the instru- 
ment panel which are controlled with the number keys 

AHOY! 89 



1-4. Instrument 1 retracts and releases the plane's land- 
ing gear. When the indicator is red, the landing gear is 
out. Be sure you retract the landing gear in the air only, 
to avoid an embarrassing situation. Instrument number 
two controls the carburetor fuel mixture— white is lean, 
red is the normal rich mixture for flight. Instrument num- 
ber three controls carb heating, which prevents the car- 
buretor from icing over on cold days. Red is on, white 
is off. Since the air temperature is always warm when 
using Microsim, you need not use this control if you don't 
want to. Instrument 4 indicates which fuel tank is cur- 
rently in use, the "red" or the "green." Each of the num- 
ber keys 1-4 toggles each indicator to one particular set- 
ting or the other. 

The Collision Warning Indicator (CWI) is a radar in- 
strument that will turn red when there is a collision dan- 
ger to the aircraft. This could be almost anything— a flock 
of birds, another aircraft, etc. The CWI becomes active 
at some arbitrary altitude above 4000 feet. When it turns 
red, use the > and < keys to steer your aircraft out of 
the way. In Microsim, dangers exist only in one dimen- 
sion (you cannot fly above or below an obstacle to avoid 
it -you must steer around it). 

Finally, to round out the complement, there are three 
indicator lights to the right of the instrument panel. The 
top light indicates whether the aircraft's external wing/ 
tail lights and internal lighting are on or off (red=on, 



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90 AHOY! 



Re»der Strvlcn No. 294 



whitc=off). The middle light indicates whether the cab- 
in's air conditioning system is on or off (red=on, white = 
off). The bottom light indicates whether the cabin heat- 
ing system is on or off (red=on, white=off). Press 5, 
6, or 7 respectively to toggle each of these functions on 
or off. The heating, air conditioning, and external light- 
ing cause fuel to be eaten up a little faster than usual, 
so don't use them unless it's necessary. 

When you first RUN Microsim, choose the demo flight 
(Press O) to get an idea of how to fly the aircraft. Let's 
go through a quick test flight right now. Read the follow- 
ing and follow the instructions: 

1. With the plane on the ground, press and hold the 
plus (+) key to rev up the engine. Hold thislkey down 
until your groundspeed indicator shows around 65-75. 

2. Hold down the U key to raise your elevator, until 
the indicator shows about 25-30. 

3. Press the L key to lower your flaps. The aircraft 
should now take off, which will be indicated by the bor- 
der of the screen turning blue (or black at night). 

4. Lower your elevator (using D) until it reads below 
5, to keep the aircraft from ascending too last. Then press 
the 1 key to retract your landing gear. As you climb sky- 
ward, keep an eye on the airspeed indicator— the engine 
of this plane slows down intermittently. Apply a little 
throttle if need be. Also watch your altitude - the plane 
will quit if it goes above 31000 feet. Adjust the elevators 
for level flight once you reach cruising altitude. If you're 
flying above 4000 feet, keep an eye on the CWI (collision 
warning indicator). If it turns red, steer the plane out 
of the way using the rudder controls. Be quick about it! 
If you're going over 100 MPH when the CWI turns red, 
you will have only seconds to steer out of the way be- 
fore a collision. (Note: If you pass through a cloud lay- 
er, the screen border will turn white.) 

5. Landing -I'll leave this up to you, to provide you with 
a challenge. A few hints: decrease your speed to below 80 
knots before landing, or your plane will bounce severely 
and you will crash. Remember to put your flaps up, or the 
plane won't land. Also be sure to lower your landing gear 
before landing, or the result may well be unpleasant! 

Some of Microsim'?, functions can be optionally con- 
trolled with a joystick plugged into Port 2. To increase 
or decrease throttle, hold down FIRE while pushing the 
stick forward or backward. To raise or lower the eleva- 
tors, push the stick forward or backward without press- 
ing FIRE. To move the rudder left or right, push the joy- 
stick in the corresponding direction. 

I hope you have as much fun using Microsim as I had 
writing it (and I did have a very good time). If you have 
any comments or questions regarding Microsim, write 
me care of Ahoy!. Please restrict yourself to questions 
about the program — I am not a pilot. Also, please, no 
letters from pilots telling me how unrealistic my simula- 
tion is— it is not meant to be completely realistic, just 
to be an enjoyable simulation. I guess you could say Mi- 
crosim is a flight simulator SIMULATOR. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 133 



SCRATCH PAD 

For the C-64 

By Don Schmidt 



If while programming you're not using the area of 
memory from 49152 to 53247 (user RAM), 
Scratch Pad may be helpful for a variety of purpos- 
es. The program allows you to. create in the direct 
mode and safely store three 'screenfuls' of information 
(three 1000-bytc blocks) in the above area of your Com- 
modore 64's memory. Once stored, each of the 1000-byte 
blocks can be instantly reprinted to the screen at the touch 
of a single key. 

You can design your own reference material or cheat 
sheets, use one or more screens as a scratch pad to jot down 
important notes or calculations, or maintain an ongoing Ta- 
ble of Contents' of your program's subroutines and their line 
numbers and keep a record of all your variable symbols 
and what they stand for. You'll quickly learn that you can 
also use Scratch Pad as a general file for letters, recipes, 
graphics designs, addresses, and much more. 

Type in Scratch Pad exactly as listed on page 123 and 
save it to disk or tape before running it. Then run the 



program, and when the READY prompt appears type 
SYS 49188 and press RETURN. If you haven't made any 
typing errors, pressing the fl, f3, or f5 key should fill 
the screen with garbage. What you are seeing arc the 
l(H)0-byte blocks of 'unprepared' memory. 

Now clear the screen (if you do so by pressing the 
RUN/STOP-RESTORE combination, you'll have to SYS 
49188 again to reactivate the program). Print anything 
you want to the screen. To avoid the SYNTAX ERROR 
message, press the SHIFT and RETURN keys together 
instead of the RETURN key alone to return the cursor 
to the left edge of the screen. When the screen is pre- 
pared the way you want to save it, home the cursor and 
press the SHIFT key and the fl, f3, or f5 key together. 
This should have saved your screen of information. Now 
clear the screen and press the same function key without 
the SHIFT key. Your screen of information should reap- 
pear. You can recall, modify, and resave your screens 
as often as you wish. 

The second listing (see page 124) is a Load/Save rou- 
tine written in BASIC, but using several of the Kernal's 
machine language routines to save and load your screens 
to and from disk or tape. Load/Save not only allows you 
to save the screens you have designed, but the machine 
language of Scratch Pad as well. So when you load your 
screens back into memory, Scratch Pad is automatically 
loaded and activated and all you have to do is press the 
function keys. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTINGS ON PAGE 123 




Reader Service No. 115 



AHOY! 91 



( 



CMMCDCRIE I 



PROGRAMS THAT 



® 



WRITE THEMSELVES 

Simple and Relative Address Modification 

By Mark Andrews 




ne of the most strange and wonderful fea- 
tures of Commodore 64/128 assembly lan- 
guage is the availability of a programming 
technique known as address modification. 
Once you know how to use address modification, you 
can create machine code that will actually rewrite itself 
on command, sometimes saving enormous amounts of 
money and processing time. 

Here is a short subroutine that shows how the princi- 
ple of address mod ill cation works: 



ASSEMBLY 


LANGUAGE 


MACHINE 


LANGUAGE 


Label 


Code 


Add ress 


Code 


ADDRESS 


LDA VALUE 


8040 


AD A7 02 




INC ADDRESS+1 


8043 


EE 41 80 




BNE NEXT 


8046 


DO 03 




INC ADDRESS+2 


8048 


EE 42 80 


NEXT 


RTS 


804B 


60 



Examine this subroutine carefully, and you'll see that 
when it is called, the accumulator is loaded with a num- 
ber labeled VALUE. This value could be any eight-bit 
number. In the above example, however, the value of 
VALUE is the hexadecimal number S02A7. Look closely, 
and you can find the S02A7 in the language listing of 
the above subroutine. It is the number listed, low- byte 
first, following the hexadecimal number SAD in the first 
line of the listing. (The value SAD is the machine lan- 
guage equivalent of the instruction LDA.) So, when the 
subroutine listed above is executed, the first thing that 
will happen is that the accumulator will be loaded with 
the value of memory address S02A7. 

Loading the accumulator with an eight-bit value is a 
simple enough operation. But in the next three lines of 
our sample subroutine something quite extraordinary hap- 
pens. The algorithm that is used in these three lines is 
a common operation for incrementing a 16-bit number. 
But just what number is being incremented in this ex- 
ample'? Once you know the answer to that question, you'll 
know the secret behind address modification. 

Take a very close look at the second and fourth lines 
of the illustrated subroutine, and you'll see that the val- 
ue being incremented is whatever 16-bit value happens 
to reside in a pair of memory addresses labeled 

92 AHOY! 



ADDRESS+1 and ADDRESS+2. And what addresses 
are those? Well, when the subroutine dial we're examining 
is assembled into machine language and loaded into mem- 
ory, the machine language equivalent of the assembly lan- 
guage instruction LDA will be stored in a memory ad- 
dress labeled ADDRESS. And this address, as you can 
see by consulting the machine language column of the 
listing, is memory location $8040 (the dollar sign indi- 
cates that the address is a hexadecimal number). 

Now the plot thickens. When our sample subroutine 
is assembled and executed for the first time, the accum- 
ulator will be loaded with the value stored in memory 
address S02A7. Then, in the next three lines of the sub- 
routine, the operand of the mnemonic LDA will be incre- 
mented from S02A7 to S02A8. So the next time the sub- 
routine is called, the accumulator will be loaded not with 
the value of memory address S02A7. but with the value 
of memory address S02A8. And the operand of the in- 
struction LDA will continue to be incremented in this 
way every time the subroutine is called. 

If you're familiar with indirect indexed addressing, 
you'll probably notice that indirect addressing and ad- 
dress modification can be used in a similar way. But ad- 
dress modification has certain advantages over indirect 
addressing in some applications. 

Some programmers don't like to use address modifica- 
tion because routines that make use of it are not easily 
transportable from one program to another, and are of- 
ten somewhat difficult to understand. Nevertheless, ad- 
dress modification is a very powerful technique that is 
used quite often in high-performance assembly language 
programs. Routines that use address modification are 
compact and fast-running, and they leave the X and Y 
registers of the 6510 chip free for other uses. And, al- 
though address mcxlilieation routines can be used in much 
the same way as zero-page indexed addressing, they don't 
require the use of zero-page memory, which is always 
in short supply. So a thorough understanding of address 
modification techniques can be of great value to an as- 
sembly language programmer. 

RELATIVE ADDRESS MODIFICATION 

A more sophisticated variety of address modification, 
called relative address modification, is used in the as- 
sembly language program called SKETCHER that ap- 
pears on page 142. SKETCHER is a completed version 



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Header Service No. 279 



of a program that was presented, broken down into two 
parts, in last month's column. With the SKETCHER pro- 
gram and a Commodore-compatible joystick, you can 
draw high-resolution pictures on a computer screen. 
When you've finished drawing a picture, you can hit your 
joystick's trigger button and clear your screen. 

In the SKETCHER program, relative address modifica- 
tion is used to make the program branch to a set of sub- 
routines labeled UP, DOWN, LEFT, and RIGHT. These 
subroutines are used to detect the direction in which the 
joystick is being held, and to move a cursor in a corre- 
sponding direction on the screen. As you may know, this 
is one way in which an ON. ..GOTO routine could be 
used in a BASIC program. 

The address modification routine in SKETCHER 
makes use of a data table that appears in Lines 414 through 
424. This tabic is labeled RELADS (which stands for 
"relative address"). But the values of the bytes in the 
RELADS table are not defined as specific numbers. In- 
stead, each value in the table is defined as the result of 
a subtraction operation - specifically, as the difference 
between the address of a given value in the table and the 
address of a line labeled MODRl in the SKETCHER 
program. The line labeled MODR1, as you can see by 
studying the SKETCHER program, is the first line in 
a series of joystick-reading routines. So, by using the ad- 
dresses of MODRl as a base, the address of each joystick- 



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Reader Service No. 101 



reading routine in the program can be easily calculated. 

Look carefully at the RELADS table, and you will see 
that each value in the table is equal to the address of one 
specific joystick-movement routine, minus an offset value 
that corresponds to the address of Line 294 of the SKETCH- 
ER program- the line labeled MODRl. And that is how 
the address of MODRl is used to calculate the addresses 
of the joystick-reading routines in the program. 

The segment of the SKETCHER program that uses 
address modification extends from Line 289 through Line 
297. In Line 290, the direction switch of a joystick has 
just been read, and the value thus obtained has been stored 
in the 6510 chip's X register. If the joystick's trigger but- 
ton is currently being pressed, the screen is cleared and 
the joystick is read again. If the trigger button has not 
been pressed, the accumulator is loaded with an eight- 
bit value that points to a specific address: namely, the 
address of one of the joystick-movement routines in Lines 
298 through 350 of the SKETCHER program. An offset 
that points to the address of the desired routine is then 
calculated and stored in an address labeled MODREL+1. 

The address of MODREL+1 can be found in Line 293 
of the SKETCHER program: 

293 MODREL BNE * 

In assembly language programs that arc written using 
the Merlin 64 assembler (as this one was), an asterisk 
used in the above fashion is always interpreted as the cur- 
rent value of the assembler's program counter. So, when 
the above line is assembled into machine language, mem- 
ory addresses MODREL+1 and MODREL+2 will hold 
nothing but a 16-bit value pointing to the address of 
MODREL+l. However, as soon as SKETCHER is exe- 
cuted, the contents of MODREL+1 and MODREL+2 
will be changed. MODREL+2 will retain its original 
value, but MODREL +1 (the low byte of the value stored 
in MODREL+t and MODREL+2) will be changed to 
whatever value is currently stored in the accumulator. 
This value, as we have seen, will now be the value of 
a specific byte in the data table labeled RELADS. And 
each byte in that table, as mentioned previously, is an 
eight-bit pointer which the SKETCHER program uses 
as an offset to calculate the address of a specific joystick- 
movement routine. 

Address modification is quite an advanced concept, even 
for an experienced assembly language programmer. So if 
all of this seems a little foggy at first, please don't despair. 
Just run the SKETCHER program, observe what it does, 
and take another look at the program to sec how it does 
it. Once you understand what the program does, learning 
how it does it should be much less of a problem. D 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 142 

NEXT MONTH: Customizing the Commodore 64/128 
Character Set -How to create your own text characters, 
and how to incorporate text characters into high-resolu- 
tion graphics programs. 



94 AHOY! 



c 



c 



ADI-T'S C 



ma 



Buying, Interfacing, and Operating 

a Printer 

By Cheryl Peterson 



Ah! New Year's Resolution time, folks. Are 
we all resolved to learn to use our compu- 
ters more effectively? I'm certainly going to 
try to pick up a few new tricks this year. My 
educational endeavors will probably focus on the C-128 and 
Amiga computers, but I'll still be fiddling around with my 
64. Since Commodore users catch on fast. I've got to hustle 
to stay at least one step ahead of you. 

This month I'll focus on printers; how to choose one, 
and what to do with it after you've got it. Those of you 
who already have a printer, stick around. We've got some- 
thing for you, too. We'll take a look at printer control 
codes. ASCII lookup tables, and DIP switches. Although 
it may sound a little complicated, interfacing a printer 
to a Commodore computer isn't so bad. And once you 
get the hang of it, you can do some really amazing things. 

CHOOSING THE RIGHT PRINTER 

Because you could end up spending $500 or more by 
the time you're really happy with your printer, it's a pur- 
chase you should consider carefully. As with anything 
you buy for your computer, you need to make sure your 
prospective buy works with the software and other peri- 
pherals you already have. If the printer you're consider- 
ing does everything but make peanut butter and doesn't 
work with your word processor or graphics package, keep 
looking. If you decide to get that printer anyway, you'll 
have to buy new software. 

So before you start shopping, make a list of the pro- 
grams you have and the printers that work with them. 
If you want to use Print Shop, for instance, there is a 
large list of printers and interfaces that will work, but 
Broderbund recommends non-Commodore printers be- 
cause the printouts look better. Some programs (Font- 
master is one) don't work with Commodore printers. 
Some graphics packages work better with Epson print- 
ers than with Commodore. The best way to be sure is 
to buy from a store where you can check the printouts 
to be sure you're satisfied. 

Also keep in mind what you need to do with the print- 
er. There are many different types of printers, but I'll 
divide them into two categories, printers that do graph- 
ics and printers that create typewriter quality (TQ) out- 



put. TQ printers create a page that is hard to differen- 
tiate from one created with a typewriter. The nicer ones 
turn out print comparable to an IBM Sclcctric. The cheap- . 
er ones look cheap, but perfectly legible. These machines 
have a few drawbacks. They are either slow at printing 
or very expensive. And you get no graphics! 

The graphics-capable printers come in varieties from 
dot matrix with ribbons to thermot dot matrix to laser 
printers that rival typesetting machines. I seriously doubt 
if any of you want to put a $20OO-$40OO printer on your 
Commodore, and as far as I know the software to drive 
laser printers isn't yet available for us, so we'll stick to 
the standard dot matrix type. Some of these support a 
letter quality printing mode that is not as crisp as the 
TQ printers, but for most uses the difference isn't worth 
mentioning. Generally speaking, dot matrix printers are 
faster than TQ printers, even in their letter quality mode, 

POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN 
BUYING A PRINTER 

1. What software do you use? Want to use? 

2. Do you need graphics or typewriter quality? Do you 
need letter quality printing? 

3. Do you want color? 

4. Do you need speed? Quiet? 

5. How much money do you want to spend? 

6. Commodore or third party? Does it require an in- 
terface? 

7. Cost of ribbons, replacement parts like printhcads 
or alternate printwheels, 

8. Tractor feed or friction feed or both? Does tractor 
feed cost extra? 

9. Serial or parallel communication? Both? 

Most printers offer friction feed or tractor feed to get 
the paper in front of the printhead. I personally prefer 
tractor feed, because I print multipage documents and 
I hate to keep putting in new sheets of paper. Each page 
must be inserted and aligned individually with a fric- 
tion feed printer. This is a necessary consideration only 
if the software you use doesn't have a "pause at end of 
page" feature. Otherwise, it's just a matter of conveni- 
ence. Almost all printer manufacturers offer tractor feed 

AHOY! 95 



as an option, though sometimes it costs extra. 

Not all printers work with the Commodore. In fact, 
most need some kind of interface because the Commo- 
dore computers use PETASCU instead of the standard 
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Inter- 
change) used by other computer and printer manufac- 
turers. Unless you buy a Commodore printer (or one with 
a built-in Commodore interface), you'll have to pay from 
S50-S125 for an interface cable to run from your com- 
puter to the printer (see below). 

Also consider whether or not you plan to move up to 
a different computer later on (or already own another 
computer). Most computers use an RS-232C connector 
or a Centronics parallel connector to interact with the 
outside world. Commodore's serial connectors are non- 
standard and you may have a hard time getting a Commo- 
dore-compatible printer to work with another computer. 
If you face this problem, I'd recommend looking for a 
dual interface printer or a Centronics printer and a third 
party serial to parallel interface. There are Commo- 
dore-to-RS-232 interfaces being marketed, but they are 
less plentiful and offer a more limited variety. 

Before I get into the nitty gritty of interfacing printers 
with the Commodore, I want to recommend a couple of 
articles that have appeared in Ahoy! in the past: Tom 
Benford's article on choosing a printer in the December 
'84 issue and Morton Kevelson's three-pan series on print- 



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Reader Service No. 299 



er interfacing beginning in that same issue and contin- 
uing in February and March '85. Ahoy! has run many 
articles on getting the most from graphics programs and 
the most popular printers. 

We haven't done anything on getting to the fancy print 
styles that can be used in text printing: things like near 
letter quality, boldface, doubles! rike. alternate pitch and 
line spacing, super- and subscript, expanded and com- 
pressed characters, italic printing, and international char- 
acter sets. Most of these are supported by the more pop- 
ular third party dot matrix printers. TQ printers support 
many of these, but expanded, compressed, and italic print 
aren't usually possible. Commodore printers may also 
have some of these features. 

Rather than be too specific and limit our discussion 
to only some printers, I'm going to explain the general 
principles involved in communication between printers 
and computers. You should be able to apply this infor- 
mation to whatever model you use. 

INTERFACING NICETIES 

ASCII is a way of representing all the commonly used 
typing characters with numbers. These numbers are what 
is sent along the cable between a computer and printer. 
The computer converts the numbers back into letters and 
prints them. Special characters are used to represent 
things like tabs, carriage returns, linefeeds, and other 
printhead positioning commands. These characters are 
all part of the standard established years ago. You can 
find a modified version of the ASCII code list in the Pro- 
grammer's Reference Guide or your Commodore 64 Us- 
er's Guide, Commodore chose to redesignate some of 
the code in order to facilitate graphics usage. 

In addition to these characters, each printer company 
has chosen certain character strings to recognize as com- 
mands that cause the printer to switch printing modes. 
Getting an Epson printer to switch from 10 characters 
per inch (CPI) to 12 requires sending an escape (ESC) 
character followed by an M. Frequently printer manu- 
facturers use the ESC to designate that the characters that 
follow are a command. Have you heard computer users 
talking about sending escape or control codes to their 
printers? Perhaps your word processor's documentation 
mentions sending "special" codes to access alternate print 
styles? This is what they mean. 

In some printer manuals, these characters may be rep- 
resented by their CHRS codes. The reason for this is that 
many printer manuals expect the user to be sending these 
codes using a BASIC program. For instance, a PRINT 
CHR$(27rM" could be used to send the 12 CPI code 
to the printer. Of conrsc, with the Commodore you'd have 
to open a channel to the printer first. Somewhere in al- 
most every printer manual, there is a table that shows 
the codes needed to get that particular printer to turn on 
the fancy footwork. Sometimes that's all you need. 

With many application programs (word processors, es- 
pecially) it's not that simple. If the program offers im- 
bedded print codes that will automatically turn on fancy 



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Render Service No. 113 



features for you, you may not need to use the CHRS 
codes. But usually, these codes are optimized for certain 
printers at the expense of using them on others. For in- 
stance, one word processor I have claims to let the user 
switch from 10 to 12 CPI just by imbedding a special 
character (created by holding down the C= key and an- 
other). This may work with other setups, but for my Ep- 
son RX-80 and Cardco +G interface it did not. While 
it did recalculate the line length so that it put more than 
80 characters on each line it didn't switch the pitch. 

Instead, another special character that sent the CHRS 
value of the next character to the printer had to be used 
to imbed an ESC in the text, and the ESC had to be fol- 
lowed by an M. Using this roundabout method, it was 
possible to access most of the Epson's neatest features. 
It was not, however, convenient to do so. This is one rea- 
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how to send the proper codes. I have such a printer and 
it took me two days to get the letter quality mode on it work- 
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Reader Service No. 296 



by a [, a 1 and a y to turn on word processing mode, then 
an ESC[4y to turn on 10 CPI letter quality mode. An 
ESC[5y is used to turn on 12 CPI letter quality. 

Though it sounds easy, reading the printer manual for 
the MT160L did nothing hut confuse me. The authors 
describe the process in terms of hexadecimal values for 
the ASCII codes and refer the user to a cryptic table on 
the inside of the back cover. That's why it took two days 
to figure it out! Fortunately, the software I use has a print- 
er file contained on the disk. Once the correct codes are 
entered into the file, it will remember them and use them 
each time it prints a Hie. I have two different printer files 
-one for fast printing, the other for letter quality. 

Normally the Commodore's reassigned ASCII values 
must be translated into codes that the printer can under- 
stand in order for it to print the graphics. Intelligent in- 
terfaces do this translation, unless a special code is sent 
that switches them off. When working in text mode it 
is sometimes better to turn the graphics off altogether. 
Sometimes this can be done by using an internal switch, 

Usually a group of DIP (Dual Inline Position) switches 
have to be set before the interface is used. These switches 
allow the interface to be used with a variety of printers, 
even though each printer is different. These switches may 
control whether a linefeed is automatically generated with 
a carriage return, whether the interface can be turned off 
by the software in the Commodore (transparent mode), and 
whether the printer is device four or five. 

Many printers also have such switches inside. In order 
for interface, printer, and Commodore to work together, 
all the switches must be set correctly. For instance, if 
the printer's auto-linefeed is turned on, the auto-l indeed 
in the interface is turned on, and the software you are 
using does an auto-linefeed with each carriage return, 
you'll get a triple-spaced document. Which is fine, if you 
want a triple-spaced document. Otherwise, you'll need 
to turn some of those linefeeds off. 

Of course, by buying a Commodore printer or one with 
a built-in interface, you avoid many of these problems. 
Again, if you are really struggling with interfacing diffi- 
culties, I'd suggest contacting your local user group. You 
may find someone there who's gone through the same trials. 

MAYBE I CAN HELP 

Although it is difficult to give advice long distance, I can 
be found on Viewtron, Leave me a message in the For Start- 
ers SIG and I'll try to help you figure out what's wrong. 
If you've heard of a new printer and aren't sure about how 
well it works, you might leave a message asking if anyone 
else has experience with that brand. I'll be happy to give 
help in any areas you may be having trouble with, so drop 
me a line. My user ID is 266399CCP. I can also be found 
hanging around in Viewtron's CB section under the handle 
Cherp! Hope to see you there. □ 



Next month in Cadet's Column; We'll learn a few les- 
sons about structured programming by sprucing up 
some sloppy BASIC Also: how computL'rphobic are you? 



98 AHOY! 




ALARM CLOCK 

For the C-64 

By Tony St. Clair 




Alarm Clock is an interrupt-driven utility 
which uses the C-64 time-of-day (TOD) 
clock to display the current time and alarm 
at some predetermined time. When run, 
the program asks the user to enter the current time. Either 
military or standard format can be used. If the standard 
format is used, the program will prompt for "am or pm" 
after entering the hour. 

After entering the current time, the alarm time is en- 
tered in the same manner. When the current time reach- 
es the time set for the alarm, the border will Hash red 
and an audible alarm is produced. Two options are includ- 
ed in the program: 1) The audible alarm can be defeated, 
and 2) The present time can be continuously displayed 
in the upper right corner; or, to avoid any interference 
while entering BASIC statements on the first line, it can 
be disabled. In either case the alarm function will still 
be active. 

The program works as follows. First, the top-of-BASIC 
pointer is lowered by 512 bytes to make room for the ma- 
chine language (ML) portion of the program which is 
POKEd into memory in the read-data loop. In this man- 
ner the alarm clock can be active while other BASIC 
programs arc in memory. Also, none of the free RAM 
at location 49152 is used, so that other BASIC utilities 
that may be resident will not be disturbed. The ML rou- 
tine changes the IRQ vector so that 60 times a second 
the TOD clock is read, compared to the alarm time, and, 
optionally, written to the screen. If it is found that the 
current time matches the alarm time the alarm sequence 
is initiated. Every half-second the border will begin to 
alternate between red and the original border color. Dur- 
ing this time the border color cannot be changed using 
the normal POKE command. (The IRQ will change it 
right back.) If so indicated, a tone will be heard with 
each flash of the border. 

Since this program uses the TOD clock and not the 
jiffy clock, there are some advantages. Tape saves and 
loads will not interfere with the TOD clock (the screen 
display will be temporarily halted but will be updated 
at the completion of the save/load). Even a cold reset 
(SYS 64738) will not alter the TOD registers. (The IRQ 
vector will, however, be returned to normal.) Also, the 
TOD clock is automatically kept in the hour: minute sec- 
ond format that is easy to understand, as opposed to the 
obscure jiffy system. 

The following memory locations, i.e. constants in the 
Data statements, can be changed to provide different ef- 
fects during program operation: 



Enable/Disable routine, SYS 40449 

Color of flash, 0-15 40708 

Rate of flash, 0-255 40699,40736 

Alarm hour, Binary Coded Decimal 40737 

Alarm minute, Binary Coded Decimal 40738 

Time display flag, 0=No 40739 

Audio level, 0-15 40680 

Note frequency (Lo-byte), 0-255 40625 

Note frequency (Hi -byte), 0-255 40630 

Waveform, 17, 33, or 129 40645 ' 



Some of these locations may be changed at any time; 
others may only be altered while the alarm sequence is 
not activated. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 143 



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Reader Service No. 290 



AHOYt 99 



c 



CMMCDAMEC 

MKJGRAMMING d-IAI J JENGI3 



By Dale Rupert 




ach month, we'll present several challenges de- 
signed to stimulate your synapses and toggle the 
bits in your cerebral random access memory. 
We invite you to send your solutions to: 

Commodates, c/o Ahoy! 

P.O. Box 723 

Bethel, CT 06801 

We will print and discuss the cleverest, simplest, short- 
est, most interesting and/or most unusual solutions. Be 
sure to identify the name and number of the problems 
you are solving. Also show sample runs if possible, where 
appropriate. Be sure to tell what makes your solutions 
unique or interesting, if they are. 

Programs on diskette arc welcome, but they must be 
accompanied by listings. You must enclose a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope if you want any of your materials 
returned. Solutions received by the middle of the month 
shown on the magazine cover are most likely to be dis- 
cussed, but you may send solutions and comments any 
time. Your original programming problems, suggestions, 
and ideas are equally welcome. The best ones will be- 
come Commodores! 

PROBLEM #25-1: CHARACTER SPIRAL 

This problem was submitted by Necah Buyukdura of 
Ankara, Turkey. Consider 25 adjacent columns and the 
25 rows of the screen forming a 625-character square. 
Write a program which fills the blank square with 625 
characters beginning in the center of the square and pro- 
gressing in a counter-clockwise direction, like a wind- 
ing spiral. The program should then unwind the spiral 
by filling the square with different characters or spaces, 
and the whole process is repeated. Can you come up with 
the fastest BASIC solution? 

PROBLEM #25-2; DANDY DELETION 

This problem was submitted by Jim Speers (Niles, MI) 
and can be approached similarly to his REM Remover 
discussed this month. The user specifies a low and a high 
line number. Write a subprogram beginning at line 60000 
which deletes all program lines within those limits. 

PROBLEM #25-3; COLOR CRITERIA 

Solve this useful one proposed by Steven M. Sleekier 
(Columbia, MD). When this program is run, the user 
types "RED, WHITE, BLUE", for example, to select the 
border, background, and text colors on the monitor. 

W0 AHOY! 



PROBLEM #25-4: CENTRAL LOCATOR 

My word processor has a text centering function which 
is activated before the line of text to be centered is typed. 
The cursor is at the midpoint of the line initially. Here's 
what it looks like when the word "Test" is typed (the cur- 
sor is indicated by "□"): 

□ 
TD 

TeD 

TesD 

TestD 
The first letter appears at the cursor's initial position and 
the cursor moves one space to the right. The second letter 
appears where the first letter was, the first letter is pushed 
to the left, and the cursor stays where it was. This pro- 
cess is repeated. The odd numbered characters replace 
the cursor and the cursor moves one space to the right. 
The even numbered characters shove all the text on the 
line one space to the left and the cursor doesn't move. 
Can you program this function? 

This month we will look at readers' solutions to the 
September 1985 Commodates. Problem #21-1: Geometry 
Fun, proposed by Phil MacLean (Columbus, OH), 
brought numerous responses. The problem involved de- 
termining whether three specified points formed a straight 
line or not. If the three points are colinear, the program 
tells which of the three points is between the other two. 

The solution involved not only some analytic geom- 
etry but some sorting as well. Most readers used the 
straightforward procedure of calculating the slopes of the 
lines between points one and two and between points two 
and three. If the slopes are equal (within accuracy limits 
of the computer) , the three points are coliincar. One com- 
plication is the fact that a vertical line has an undefined 
slope since the horizontal coordinates of the three points 
are equal. 

The program listed below takes a more unusual approach. 

1 REM 

2 REM C0MM0DARE #21-1 : GEOMETRY FUN 

3 REM SOLUTION BY JOYCE AND B.A, ZID0VEC 
k A$="C0LLINEAR POINTS!" 

5 P$="P0INT #":P1$=" LIES BETWEEN POINTS 

10 PRINT CHR$(U7):F0RI-1T03:PRINT"PAIR 



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Rflader Service No. 106 



(X,Y) #"I:INPUTX(I),Y(I):NEXT 

15 S(1)=SQR((X(1)-X(2))*2+CY(1)-Y(2))"2) 

16 S(2)=SQR((X(2)-X(3))"2+(Y(2)-YC3)) A 2) 

17 S(3)=SQR((X(3)-X(1))*2+(Y(3)-Y(1))*2) 

20 T1=X(1)*Y(2)+X(2)*Y(3)+X(3)*Y(1) 

21 T2=X(1)*Y(3)+X(2)*Y(1)+X(3)*Y(2) 

25 IF T1-T2 THEN PRINT "NOT "A$:GOTO 70 

30 PRINT A$ 

40 IFS(3)>S(1)ANDS(3)>S(2)THENPRINTP$"2" 

Pl$"l & 3": GOTO 70 

50 IFS(2)>S(1)ANDS(2)>S(3)TI1ENPRINTP$"1" 

Pl$"2 & 3": GOTO 70 

60 IFS(1)>S(2)ANDS(1)>S(3)THENPRINTP$"3" 

Pl$"l & 2": GOTO 70 

65 PRINT"TWO OR MORE POINTS ARE IDENTICA 

L" 

70 WAIT 198,1: GOTO 10 

This program from Joyce and B. A. Ziilovac (Kitchen- 
er, ONT) uses a method which Wylic A. Smith (Annap- 
olis, MD) refers to as "The Surveyor's Method" based 
on Green's Theorem. The quantity (T1-T2) in line 25 is 
zero if the three points are collinear. Otherwise it is 
non-zero. 

Lines 15 through 17 of their program calculate the 
lengths of the line segments between each pair of points. 
For three collinear points, the longest line segment is be- 



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Rejder Service No. 287 



tween the two outside points. The point which is between 
the other two shares the two shorter line segments. Lines 
40 through 60 decide which point is in the middle. Line 
70 waits until a key is pressed at which time execution 
resumes at line 10. The key is actually used by the pro- 
gram, so don't press the < RETURN > key to contin- 
ue. Your next keystroke should be the next X coordinate 
to be entered, 

Wylie A. Smith mentioned that this method is applica- 
ble to any number of points. He also said that the value 
of (T1-T2) can be used to find the area of the polygon de- 
fined by non-col linear points. The area is simply the abso- 
lute value of (T1-T2) divided by two. You could easily mod- 
ify the program to display the area. If you arc interested 
in the general method of determinants for finding the area 
and even the direction of travel around an N-sided poly- 
gon, send me a stamped envelope with your request. 

Problem 021-2; Logical Fun submitted by Michael 
Marron (Stony Brook, NY) was fun for quite a few read- 
er. The solution from Frank T. Smith (Wilmington, DE) 
is representative of the majority of the solutions received. 

1 REM 

2 REM C0MM0DARE #21-2 : LOGICAL FUN 

3 REM SOLUTION BY FRANK T. SMITH 

4 REM 

10 FOR S=l TO 2 

20 IF S-l THEN PRINT"STATEMENT #1 IS TRU 
e m 

30 IF S=2 THEN PRINT'STATEMENT H IS FAL 

SE" 

40 FOR A=65 TO 95 STEP 10 

50 FOR 13=65 TO 95 STEP 10 

60 FOR C=65 TO 95 STEP 10 

70 FOR D=65 TO 95 STEP 10 

120 IF A=95 AND C<>65 THEN 1000 

130 IF 0=75 AND A<>65 THEN 1000 

140 IF A<=D THEN 1000 

150 IF B<>95 AND A<>75 THEN 1000 

160 IF 0=85 AND D=65 THEN 1000 

170 IF C<>95 AND D<>85 THEN 1000 

180 IF B<>85 AND D=85 THEN 1000 

190 T-0 

200 IF A=B OR A=C OR A-D OR B=C OR B=D 

R C=D THEN T-l 

210 IF S-l AND T-l THEN 1000 

220 IF S=2 AND T=0 THEN 1000 

230 PRINT "AL:"A;" BETTY :"B;" CONNIE: "C; 

" DAN:"D 

1000 NEXTD: NEXTC: NEXTB: NEXTA: NEXTS 

Frank's program combines the two parts of the prob- 
lem. The first statement that all grades must be differ- 
ent is true for part one and false for part two. Several 
readers correctly pointed out that there are many solu- 
tions unless we assume that the only valid grades are 65, 
75, 85, and 96. Lines 40 through 70 generate all possi- 
ble combinations of those four grades. Lines 120 through 



102 AHOY! 



180 correspond to conditions 2 through 8 of the original 
problem. Line 200 determines whether any of the grades 
are the same or not. 

Whenever the conditions in any statement (lines 120 - 
180) are met, the program branches to line 1000 since the 
current grades do noi meet the requirement in the prob- 
lem. For example, statement 2 said that if Al (A) gets a 
95, then Connie (C) will get a 65. Line 120 of the program 
sees if the current values of A and C meet that stipulation. 
If A equals 95 but C does not equal 65, then that particular 
combination of grades is not valid. The program branches 
to line 1000 to get the next set of grades. 

Only when all conditions are met does the program 
reach line 230 which prints out the names and their cor- 
responding grades. There is one correct solution for all 
grades being different: 

Al = 75 Betty = 85 Connie = 95 Dan = 65 

If we assume that the first statement is false, hence 
"We will all get different marks" is a false statement, there 
are five solutions: 



Al 


Betty 


Connie 


Dan 


75 


65 


95 


65 


75 


75 


95 


65 


75 


95 


95 


65 


85 


95 


95 


65 


85 


95 


95 


75 



Most readers sent solutions that included the single so- 
lution listed above as part of this second set of solutions. 
Several readers used a slightly different way of ap- 
proaching this problem. As an example, consider rule 
7: "If Connie doesn't get a 95, then Dan will get an 85." 
Rather than slating 

IF C<>95 AND D<>85 THEN ... (skip 
invalid values) 

some people preferred 

IF C<>95 AND NOT(D=85) THEN ... (skip 
invalid values) 

In other words, if the first condition is valid but the sec- 
ond condition is not, the statement as a whole is invalid. 
Obviously both statements listed above give identical re- 
sults. Use the form that is more natural for you. 

Extra credit goes to Frank T. Smith. Wallace Leekcr 
{Lemay, MO), Chris Roseman {Silver Spring, MD), 
David Hoffner (Brooklyn, NY), and Jim Speers (Niles, 
MI). These readers stated that either conditions 2, 3, 4, 
and 6 or conditions 2, 3, 6, and 8 can be omitted and 
still give the same solutions. Wallace Leekcr and the pro- 
poser Michael Marron were the only two to list both seLs 
of extraneous conditions. The other readers listed only 
one. There were no exotic methods revealed for solving 
this bonus problem. Apparently everyone simply replaced 





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Redder Service No. 339 



AHOY! 103 



groups of statements with REM statements until the prop- 
er combination of unnceded statements was found. 

The biggest response this month was for Problem §21-3: 
Decimal Columns proposed by E. Harvey Hammett 
(Houston, TX). The program below was adapted from 
the solutions of Matt Shapiro and Ken Karow (unfortun- 
ately their addresses were on their envelopes, not on their 
listings; the envelopes were discarded). 

1 REM 

2 REM COMMODARE #22-3 : DECIMAL COLUMNS 

3 REM SUGGESTED BY KEN KAROW 

4 REM AND BY MATT SHAPIRO 

5 REM 

6 SP$=" " 
10 DC=8 :REM DECIMAL COLUMN (1 TO 30) 
20 FOR 1=1 TO 5: READ N:G0SUB 1000 

30 NEXT I : END 

100 DATA 12. 5 ,-134. 56, -.0026, 23, 1.234 

999 REM +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+- 

1000 F$=STR$(N):F0R L=l TO LEN(F$) 

1010 C$=MID$(F$,L,1):IF C$<>"." AND C$<> 

"E" THEN NEXT L 

1020 PRINT LEFT$(SP$,DC-L)+F$: RETURN 

2000 REM -=-CHANGE N TO F$ IN 20: DELETE 

F$=STR$(N) IN LINE 1000 TO PRINT 

2010 REM SCI. NOTATION AS DECIMAL 




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Line 10 allows the programmer to specify the column 
on the screen or the printer at which the decimal points 
should be aligned. The three-line subroutine at lines 1000 
to 1020 converts the numerical value in N into a string 
value. The decimal point or the exponential "E" is loca- 
ted in line 1010. The proper number of spaces and then 
the number are printed in line 1020. This version of the 
program displays numbers which are between -0,01 and 
0.01 in their scientific notation format, e.g. 2E-3 instead 
of 0.002. If you prefer to keep the number in the same 
form as it is entered, change the N in line 20 to FS and 
delete the FS=STRS(N) in line 1000. Many other read- 
ers sent very similar programs and procedures. 

To send the output to a printer instead of the screen, 
simply add line 7: 

7 OPEN 4,4 

and change the PRINT in line 1020 to PRINT#4. 

The shortest BASIC solution to Problem §21-4: REM 
Remover was written by Don French (Minneapolis, MN). 
The problem proposed by Jim Speers (Niles, MI) was 
to append a routine onto a main program which would 
remove all program lines which begin with either a REM 
statement of a semicolon. Don's solution is listed below. 

1 REM 

2 REM COMMODARE #21-4 : REM REMOVER 

3 REM SOLUTION BY DON FRENCH 

4 REM 

55000 J=43 : P0KE631 , 19: POKE632 , 13 : P0KE633 

, 13 : PRINT" [CLEAR] [ DOWN ]G0T055000" 

55003 IFK=580RK=143THENPRINT"[H0ME]";STR 

$(PEEK(J+2)+PEEK(J+3)*256):P0KE198,3:END 

55005 J=PEEK(J)+PEEK(J+l)*256:K=PEEK(J+4 

):IFJ>0THEN55003 

Most of the solutions to this problem were similar to 
Don's approach. He uses the "dynamic keyboard" tech- 
nique. Characters are POKEd into the keyboard buffer 
during execution of the program. When the program ends, 
those keystrokes are executed by the computer just as 
if they had been typed directly. (Refer to this month's 
Rupert Report for another example using this technique.) 
Typically the keystrokes cause the program to run again, 
after some onscreen editing features have been utilized. 

Specifically, line 55000 puts the <HOME> and two 
< RETURN > characters (characters 19 and 13) into the 
keyboard buffer. It also clears the screen, moves the cur- 
sor down to line 2 on the screen, and prints "GOTO 
55000". Line 55003 looks at the first character in the pro- 
gram line to see if it is a semicolon (character 58) or 
a REM statement token (character 143). If so, the cur- 
sor is HOMEd and the line number of that line is deter- 
mined and printed on the screen. The value three is put 
into the keyboard buffer counter, and the program ends. 

The computer executes the three keystrokes it finds in 
the keyboard buffer. It moves the cursor to the top cor- 



104 AHOY! 



ner of the screen and behaves as if the < RETURN > 
key is pressed. Consequently the program line corre- 
sponding to the line number on the screen is deleted just 
as if you had typed a line number, then pressed < RE- 
TURN > to delete that line. 

Actually K equals zero on the first time through this 
subprogram so line 55003 is bypassed. Line 55005 cal- 
culates the memory location of the first program line and 
stores it in J. The first two bytes starting at location J 
are the pointer to the start of the next program line. The 
bytes at location J +2 and J +3 are the line number. The 
first character in that line is stored in location J+4. K 
is now given the value of the first character in the line. 

If the end of the program has been reached, the next- 
line address in J will equal zero. In that case, the pro- 
gram ends. If J does not equal zero, the program branch- 
es back to line 55003 where the value of K is tested. 

This program starts back at the beginning of the main 
program every time one line is deleted. Some readers 
sent solutions which kept track of the last line deleted. 
Theoretically they should be faster than the program 
above. On the other hand, Don's program is fast enough 
to be quite impressive. 

Jim Speers uses a similar program during debugging. 
Since a line beginning with a colon still functions prop- 
erly, Jim adds trace statements to print out variables or 
to halt the execution to his program but precedes them 
with a semicolon. Then when debugging is finished, he 
types RUNS 5000 to clean up the program. Normally you 
should load this utility first, then type your program to 
be debugged. Alternately you may load the main pro- 
gram, then type or merge the REM Remover utility. 

Congratulations and thanks to the many others with 
solutions to these Commodores. People with valid pro- 
grams this month who were not mentioned earlier in- 
clude the following: 



Richard Pohlund (PiUsford, NY) 
Don Ackermun (Grass Lake, MI) 
Paul Mather (Warminster. ONT) 
David Butcher (Muryarittivvn. WV) 
Ross Parlette (Sunnyvale, CA) 
Brian Wilcox (New Britain, CD 
David Wright (New Britain, CT) 
Kenneth Hill (Kansas City, MO) 
Steven Steckler (Columbia, MD) 
Larry Anderson (San Andreas, CA) 
Rim Barnhouse (ZanesviHe, OH) 
Eric Biberhot'er (Dundas, ONT) 
Gerald Polhier (Yarmouth City, NS) 
A. D. MucDonald (Millgrove, ONT) 
Chuck Slouer (Philadelphia, PA) 
James E. Killman (Memphis, TN) 
Dennis Robertson (N. Pt. Richcy, FL) 
David Ra snake (New Port Richey. FL) 
Ed Polyberne (Briektuwn, NJ) 



James Borden (Carlisle, PA) 
John R. Pruger (Bay City, MI) 
Mark Bearden (Steele, AL) 
Ron Weiner (Levittown. PA) 
Bill Binder (Northville. MI) 
Russell Prater (Parker, FL) 
Chris Barth (Clinton, NJ) 
Doug Olney (Coventry, RI) 
Fred Theilig (Riverside, RI) 
Rick Tyhurst (Rldgecrest. CA) 
Jeffrey Mantel (Anderson, IN) 
Linda C. Garcia (Fontana, CA) 
Maurice Tift (Albany, GA) 
Jim Johnston (Haskell, TX) 
Paul DeLuca (Bradford, MA) 
Thomson Fung (San Diego, CA) 
Brian Wilcox (Benton, KY) 
Steven G. Eason (Benton, KY) 
Todd Hauser (Bicitnell. IN) 



And last but certainly not least, John Immarino (Hack- 
ensack, NJ). 

One final tidbit sent by Jim Speers. What BASIC key- 
word will function as intended even when misspelled? 
Keep those solutions coming! □ 



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AHOY! 105 



T IPSAHQY I 

Compiled by Michael Dcivila 



C-64 WITH C-128 KEYS 

The Commodore 128 has a handy numeric keypad. 
Unfortunately, it does not function in 64 mode. With Key- 
pad Enable, the numeric keypad and the four cursor 
movement keys are enabled. This utility works by inter- 
cepting the key code from the numeric keypad and then 
translating it to the same key code for the main set of 
numeric and cursor keys. 

100 REM* C-128 (64 MODE) KEYPAD ENABLE * 

110 REM * BY PAUL DELEO * 

120 B=828 

130 READ A$:A=VAL(A$):POKE B, A:B=B+1 :C=C 

+A:IF B=974 THEN B=B+1:G0T0 130 

140 IF B<>989 THEN 130 

150 IFC=18512 THEN SYS976:PRINT"[CLEAR]N 

UMERIC KEYPAD BY PAUL DELEO «ENABLED»" 

:NEW 

160 PRINT "[CLEAR] ERROR IN DATA STATEMEN 

TS! PLEASE CHECK! ":END 

500 DATA 169,3,72,169,75,72,8,72,165,197 

,72, 72, 76, 49, 234, 120, 160,, 165, 203, 201, 64 

510 DATA 208, 88, 169, 255, 141,, 220, 140, 47, 

208, 173, 1 , 220,201 ,255, 240,73, 134, 197, 169 

520 DATA 254,72,162,8,141,47,208,173,1,2 

20,205,1,220,208,248,74,176,9,72,185,183 

530 DATA 3 , 240 , 2 , 1 33 , 203 , 1 04 , 200 , 202 , 208 

, 240, 104 , 56, 42, 192 , 23, 144 , 219 , 165 , 203 

540 DATA 201, 64, 240, 26, 162, 129, 160,, 144, 

8,41,127,133,203,162,194,160,1,169,235 

550 DATA 140,141,2,134,245,133,246,32,22 

4 , 234 , 169 , 255 , 141 , 47 , 208 , 32 , 66 , 235 , 76 

560 DATA 129, 234,, 27, 16,, 59, 11, 24 ,56,, 40 

,43,, 1,19, 32, 8,, 35, 44, 135, 7, 130, 2,, 120 

570 DATA 169,60,141,20,3,169,3,141,21,3, 

88,96 

The keypad and cursor keys can be deactivated by 
pressing the RUN/STOP-RESTORE keys. To reactivate, 
type SYS 976. 

-Paul Deleo 
Troy, MI 

DOUBLE SPACING 

Here's a short utility for the VIC 20 and C-64 that I've 
found very useful when modifying a program. What this 
utility does is pruvide you with a blank line between lines 
of text, thereby making a listing easier to read and/or 
modify. It can be disabled with the RUN/STOP-RE- 
STORE combination. A SYS to the starting address, 
which can be relocated, will reactivate Double Spacing. 
In brief, this utility wedges into the CHROUT routine 

106 AHOY! 



of the Kernal, which will output a character to the cur- 
rent output channel (usually the screen), and every time 
a carriage return is to be output, the machine language 
routine prints an additional carriage control character, 

10 REM*PRQGRAM-ID. DOUBLE SPACING. 
REM* AUTHOR. SHAWN K. SMITH 
20 INPUT "PLACE AT [ RIGHT ][ RIGHT] 74 7 [ 5" [L 
EFT]"]";P 

30 F0RD=P TOP + 2 : READY :P0K ED, Y: NEXT 
50 DATA 162, 000 , 160 , 001 , 142 , 038 , 003 
60 DATA 140 , 039 , 003 , 096 , 20 1 , 013 , 208 , 003 
70 DATA 032 , 00 1 , 000 , 07 6 , 00 1 , 000 : X= P+ 1 1 
90 P0KEP+3,INT(X/256):P0KEP+1,X-(PEEK(P+ 
3)*256) :L=PEEK(806) :H=PEEK(807) 
100 P0KEP+16, (L) :P0KEP+17, (H) :POKEP+19, ( 
L):P0KEP+20,(H):SYSP:LIST 
120 **** RUN /STOP- RESTORE DISABLES **** 
***SYS (PLAGE- AT) REACTIVATES**** 

NOTE: It also works with a printer! 

-Shawn K. Smith 
Bronx, NY 

BASIC TITLE SCREENS 

Here's a tip for those of you who want to add a mag- 
nificent touch of style to your programs! It's a REM state- 
ment that can be appended anywhere in a BASIC pro- 
gram. It can be used to do nearly anything that a PRINT 
statement can. This is activated by the listing of the line 
that contains it. 

1 REM ""[DEL][RVS0N][s M][ whatever else] 

Where "WHATEVER ELSE" is in the line, you can 
put nearly anything that you wish. For example, to have 
the screen cleared when that line is listed, just place a 
reverse heart (shifted S) after the shifted M and press 
RETURN. Another example is 

1 REM ""[DEL][RVS0N][s M][s S]E[RVSOFF]T 
HIS PROGRAM WAS WRITTEN BY JOHN DOE 

This line will clear the screen, change the cursor col- 
or to white, and print the message without a line num- 
ber. The contents of the REM have to appear as they do 
in a PRINT statement, just as SHIFT CLR/HOME ap- 
pears as a reverse heart and CTRL I (WHT) appears 
as a reverse E in PRINT statements. As you can see, this 
routine can be used to make different sections of pro- 
grams different colors, print a complete title screen when 
a program is listed, and endless other things to amaze 



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your less brilliant programming buddies. It can really 
add a lot of uniqueness to any program! 

-Kevin Brown 
Anderson, IN 

NO CRASH 

I always buy Ahoy!, and I have always enjoyed the pro- 
grams and other features in the magazine. But when it 
comes to using Bug Repellent, I feel very vulnerable. 
Many times I have mistyped SYS 49152. Most of the time 
the computer will lock up. This am become quite a nuis- 
ance, especially if I did not save the program that I was 
working on. 

I abolished this problem with No Crush. What the pro- 
gram does is set an interrupt wedge which prints SYS 
49152 in the upper right hand corner of the screen. To 
use the wedge, LOAD and RUN the program. The 
BASIC portion of the program will be erased. Next load 
the Bug Repellent as you normally would. To put the 
wedge to work, clear the screen and hit RETURN. Bug 
Repellent will then work as it normally does. Remember 
to clear the screen before you use the wedge by hitting 
the RUN/STOP-RESTORE combination. 

5 PRINT" [CLEAR]" 

10 F0 RX=8 2 8T090 1 : RE A D k : P0K K X , A : N K XT : S Y S8 

28: NEW 

100 DATA120, 169 , 73 , 1A1 , 20, 3 , 169 , 3, 141 , 21 

,3,88 

110 DATA96 , 169 , 58, 141 , 31 , A , 169 . 19,141 , 32 

,4,169 

120 DATA25, 141, 33, 4 ,169, 19, 141, 34, 4, 169, 

52,141 

130 DATA35, 4, 169, 57, 141, 36, 4, 169, 49, 141, 

37,4 

140 DATA169,53,141,38,4,169,50,141,39,4, 

76,49 

150 DATA234,120,169,49,141,20,3,169,234 t 

141,21,3 

160 DATA88,96,0,0,Q,0,0,0 ) 0.0,0,0 

-David Roscoe 
Passaic, NJ 

MOVE OVER MEMORY! 

In many game programs it is necessary to move a large 
block of code from ROM to the hidden RAM below. This 
is usually done by the execution of a BASIC statement 
similar to the one that follows: 

100 FOR J=40960 TO 49151: POKE J,PEEK(J) 

: NEXT J 

However, using this method takes over 30 seconds. The 
people at Commodore have included in the heart of 
BASIC ROM a mass move routine that you can use to 
do the same thing in less than two seconds. Let's say that 



108 AHOY! 



we wish to move the BASIC ROM to BASIC RAM . First 
we must POKE location 95 and 96 with the start address 
of BASIC ROM, which is 40960. Then we must POKE 
location 90 and 91 with the ending address or BASIC 
ROM plus 1, which is 49152, Then we must POKE loca- 
tion 88 and 89 with the ending address of the RAM area, 
which in this case is also 49152. Finally we must SYS 
to location 41919 to make the move. Once this is accom- 
plished, POKE the memory to reveal the hidden copy 
of RAM and you are finished. Below is the full routine 
in the form of a BASIC program. 

100 POKE 95,0: POKE 96,160 :REM ROM STAR 

T ADDRESS 

105 POKE 90,0: POKE 91,192 :REM ROM END 

ADDRESS +1 

110 POKE 88,0: POKE 89,192 :REM RAM END 

ADDRESS +1 

115 SYS 41919 

-S.D. Bctcsh 
Kingston, ONT 

CURSED CURSOR 

Positioning text on the screen can be very complica- 
ted, especially when using the cursor keys or the POKE 
statement. I wrote the following program to allow easy 
cursor positioning on the text screen. The variable A in- 
dicates where the machine language program will be 
stored. I used the cassette buffer (832), but the routine 
can be stored at other places in memory. To activate the 
routine, use the command SYS A,X,Y where A is the 
location of the routine in memory, X is the column (0- 
39), and Y is the row (0-24). The next character printed 
on the screen will be placed at the X and Y coordinates 
specified by the command. 

10 A=832 : F0RI=AT0A+28 : READJ : POKEI , J : NEXT 
20 DATA 32,253,174,32,138,173,32,247,183 
30 DATA 152,72,32,253,174,32,138,173,32 
40 DATA 247,183,152,170,104,168,24,32 
50 DATA 240,255,96 

-Mike Hoyt 
Richardson, TX 

So you think you know it all? So do most of the pro- 
grammers who submit to Tips Ahoy! Unfortunate- 
ly, very few of them actually have what it takes to 
be published in these pages. We're serious when we 
say that we want only the best programming lips that 
the Commodore community has to offer— and we'd 
much rather run a shorter installment of Tips Ahoy! 
than print second rate materia). If you're willing to 
risk the postage, be assured that financial remunera- 
tion is more than competitive by industry standards. 
Send your best to Tips Ahoy!, c/o Ion International 
Inc., 45 W. 34th St.- Suite 407, New York. NY 10001. 



®V 



7 BridgePro® ; 



BridgePro is the first program I've seen that provides a challenge 
lor the average-to-oxoellent bridge player The documentation is 
excellent and allows a new bridge player to learn (he basics 

— Harvay Bornstein, Antic Magazine, Feb. 1985 

After having tried three other bridge programs. I find that BridgePro 

is indeed a pro game. ..His designed for both the beginner and the 
advanced player. . . I didn'thnd anything that could be improved upon. 

— Helen Garret. Apple-Dayton Journal. March 1985 

It you like to play bridge and don't have three other players ever- 
enger to play, this software is a musl. For bridge freaks it's good 

enough to justify buying a computer 
. . Whether you are a master' or a 
beginner, this is great software. 
— Christian Baxter, NY 
Commodore Users Group 
Review. Sept- 1984 

BridgePro is designed to let you learn, 
improve, or just enjoy thecardgameof 
bridge The program provides com- 
plete bidding, play and scoring tor 1 or 
2 players Features include random 
hands, bidding help, demonstrahon 
mode, hand replay/quit, besl hand. 
auto finish, duplicate mode, and fast 
machine language speed. 




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AHOY! 109 



INFRARA1D 

An Error-Trapping Wedge for the C-64 

By Timothy VanDeventer 



A fact of life: bugs are unavoidable. They can 
creep into the darkest recesses of programs and, 
when everything seems to be running the 
smoothest, come out and make garbage of your 
labors. Assuming you are not immune to programming errors, 
Infraraid can help you find, and trap, pesky bugs. 

TRAPPING INSECTUS 
INTHEPBOGRAMMUS 

Recently, while working on a BASIC calculator simulation 
program, I came across an interesting (read frustrating) prob- 
lem with the way BASIC 2.0 handles errors. Or should I say, 
the way BASIC doesn't handle errors. My problem arose when 
I tried to do arithmetic operations on numbers that exceeded 
the maximally allowed limit that is stored by BASIC, which 
is approximately 1.7E+38. Any numbers larger than this limit 
would result in an '.'OVERFLOW ERROR. An example is 
1E+20 multiplied by IE+25, which should result in 1E+45; 
instead, my program would, give the dreaded 70VERFLOW 
ERROR and crash. 

One way around this, I thought, would be to convert my 
BASIC program into machine language (and lose the weeks 
of programming already spent). Another idea was to somehow 
modify BASIC to either handle larger numbers or, alternatively, 
trap the error within the program. My final solution was a 
synthesis of all three ideas: using machine language, modifying 
BASIC somewhat, and trapping the error within the program. 

(Some of you may see an easy solution to this problem: 
namely, adding the exponents and comparing the sum with 
38, the upper limit. However, for a calculator simulation pro- 
gram to be user friendly, it must allow for any size and type 
of number. Therefore the program would have to normalize 
the mantissa of a large number before adding the exponents. 
This would be a slow process in BASIC, and henceforth I came 
up with a better solution.) 

IDENTIFYING tHSECTUS 
INTHEPRQGRAMMUS 

It is essential to understand how errors are generated to be 

TABLE 1 
Code numbers for BASIC errors 

ER%=, BASIC error message Efl°/b=:BAStC error message 



1 


TOO MANY FILES 


16 


OUT OF MEMORY 


2 


FILE OPEN 


17 


UNDEFD STATEMENT 


3 


FILE NOT OPEN 


18 


BAD SUBSCRIPT 


4 


RLE NOT .FOUND 


19 


REOIM'D ARRAY 


5 


DEVICE NOT PRESENT 


20 


DIVISION BY ZERO 


6 


NOT INPUT FILE 


21 


ILLEGAL DIRECT 


7 


NOT OUTPUT FILE 


22 


TYPE MISMATCH 


8 


MISSING FILENAME 


23 


STRING TOO LONG 


9 


ILLEGAL DEVICE NUMBER 


24 


FILE DATA 


10 


NEXT WITHOUT FOR 


25 


FORMULA TOO COMPLEX 


11 


SYNTAX 


26 


CANT CONTINUE 


12 


RETURN WITHOUT G0SU8 27 


UNDEFD FUNCTION 


13 


OUT OF DATA 


28 


VERIFY 


14 


ILLEGAL QUANTITY 


29 


LOAD 


15 


OVERFLOW 
AHOY} 


30 


BREAK 


no 







able to properly handle them. There arc two potential sources 
for bugs. The type are within the program itself and are created 
by the programmer. These errors can be broken into two 
groups: syntax (or format) errors and logic errors. Syntax er- 
rors occur when the programmer breaks the rules of BASIC 
text syntax. What happens is that the BASIC interpreter comes 
across a character it cannot handle. Perhaps it was looking 
for a number and came across an ASCII letter. Another pos- 
sibility is a spelling mistake in a command word. Syntax er- 
rors always generate a BASIC error message and, therefore, 
are usually easy to find. (I did say usually, didn't I?) 

Logic errors sometimes, but not always, generate a BASIC 
error message and therefore are harder to track down. The 
most common logic error is when the program jumps to an- 
other section and, say, into the middle of a FOR-NEXT loop. 
The NEXT is encountered without a pending FOR and the 
program crashes. The SYNTAX of the program is correct, 
but the LOGIC is at fault —even though the error message 
given, ?NEXT WITHOUT FOR ERROR, might indicate to 
you a program syntax error. A logic error that doesn't crash 
the program, such as jumping to a wrong line, just won't do 
what you want it to, period. 

The second type of bugs arc not created by the programmer, 
but must nevertheless be handled properly to assure a 
smooth-running program. These can be divided into externally 
generated errors and system limitations. Externally generated 
errors can come from various sources, such as a file being 
used by the program, or directly from the user. The best way 
to handle inputs from any source is always to expect the unex- 
pected. Make sure all data received is what the program re- 
quires before using it, and reject any garbage that might come 
across. In BASIC, I always use GET rather than INPUT, and 
always store data in a string variable and convert to a numeric 
variable as needed. 

The problem I encountered in my calculator program is a 
sample of a system limitation. As you might guess, system lim- 
itations are the hardest potential source of problems to account 
for. In my case, I couldn't do arithmetic operations on large 
numbers simply because BASIC wouldn't allow mc to. But yet 
T had to allow for any number the user could possibly enter. 
That didn't mean I had to do the calculation, merely that I 
had to allow for the user to attempt to do the calculation without 
crashing my program, if this makes sense to you. (It did to 
mc!) Another linu'tation on any computer system is the amount 
of RAM the programmer has available. On the C-64, large 
array tables can quickly use up available memory. In the case 
of a hardware system limitation, you can either upgrade or 
find an alternative software solution. 

Now that we know all the potential sources of bugs that can 
infest, I will show you my solution for finding and trapping 
these critters. 

THE WEAPON AGAINST 

INSECTUS INTHEPBOGRAMMUS 

Infraraid is technically a BASIC error-trapping wedge. It 
is a 495-byte machine language program stored starting at 
50176. Note that the Commodore DOS wedge is stored starting 
at 51200, and it and Infraraid can coexist. Also note that be- 




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TABLE 2 

Values for Different TR% 

(Trap Variable) Configurations 

High byte: 16 bit TR%: OHO 0000 
Low byte: 0000 1111 

Zeroes indicate unused bits. Values in these bits can be zero of 
one as they are not checked in this version of Infraraid. 

SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS AND VALUES 



Binary expanded 

0000 0000 QQ0Q 0001 
0000 0000 0000 0010 
0000 0000 0000 0100 
0000 0000 0000 1000 
0010 0000 0000 0000 
0100 0000 0000 0000 




Decimal Function 
value (to trap) 

1 OVERFLOW ERROR 

2 DIVISION BY ZERO ERROR 
4 RLE NOT FOUND ERROR 

8 DEVICE NOT PRESENT ERROR 
32*256 STOP key interrupt 
64*256 STORE/RESTORE key sequence 



Note that any or all relevant bits may be set or clear at any time. 
Also, TR% may be changed anywhere in a BASIC program. 

It must also be understood that TR% is only referenced by Infra- 
raid when an error is generated. Therefore, if you wish to turn off 
the STOP key or the STOP/RESTORE key sequence at the begin- 
ning of a BASIC program, you must generate an error immediately 
after you set TR%. This next example will do this properly: 

10 IF A=0 THEN A=l:LOAD "INFRARAID", 8,1 

15 SYS 50176 

20 TR%=64*256+8+4+2+l:REM set STOP/REST 

ORE and other trap bits 

30 A=1/0:REM Generate error so INFRARAI 

D can disable STOP/RESTORE 

40 LN=your line number: REM put the line 

number of your error routine here 

50 EL%=LN+(LN>32767)*65536:REM This wil 

1 properly set EL% for any valid LN 

cause the error routine vector at 768- 769 has to point to In- 
fraraid, it is not relocatable. 

To save Infraraid to tape or disk, type in the BASIC loader 
program and run it. I suggest entering the loader exactly as 
listed to allow my error checking routine to work properly. 
REM's may be deleted. As the loader runs it will print the 
line number of the current data line across the screen seven 
times, which corresponds to seven data numbers per line. If 
the loader comes across bad data {less than or greater than 
255) it will halt execution and tell you which line to examine. 
In this case, simply count the number of times the line number 
was printed and the next data item in that line is the problem. 
As an example, if the loader stops and prints the message BAD 
DATA IN LINE 310 and 310 was printed tour times across the 
screen, the bad data is the fifth number in that line. The loader 
also calculates a checksum of all data (all the numbers are 
added together) and will tell you of a checksum error. In this 
case, first make sure the number in line 60 is 65731. PRINT 
CS will tell you the computed checksum. Then you will have 
to check all data individually. If BASIC crashes the loader with 
an ?OUT OF DATA ERROR, you missed some data some- 
where. After the loader is all debugged and runs through it 
will ask you if you want the wedge saved to tape or disk. 

Now that all prelim's are aside and you have a working ver- 

m AHOY! 



sion saved, let's find out what this software can do. 

EXTERMINATING INSECTUS 
MTHSPRQGRAMMUS 

Inframid is useful both in program development and as an 
error-trapping extension to BASIC 2.0. After loading, initiate 
Inframid with SYS 50176 This causes several things to happen. 
First Infraraid sets the IERROR vector at 768-769 to point to 
itself and stores the original vector. Next a few variables must 
be created. ER% is used to store the code number BASIC uses 
to identify the error (see Table 1). TR% is a prog ram -de fined 
variable that specifies which errors to trap. It is also used to 
turn on or off the RUN/STOP key or the RUN/STOP RE- 
STORE sequence (see Table 2). EL% is a third, program- 
defined variable used to specify which line in the BASIC pro- 
gram to jump to when a trapped error, referenced from TR%, 
occurs (see Tabic 3). Note that all three variables, whether 
used by a BASIC program or not, are created by Infraraid ', 

Probably the best way to learn how to use the Wedge is to 
do some examples. Load and activate infraraid if not already 
done and, enter PRINT ER% in direct mode. If there is no 
current error condition you will get 128 as the result. (Although 
not technically an error, the READY prompt is vectored 
through the BASIC error routine and has the value of 128. This 
is the easiest way to verify that the Wedge is activated when 
in direct mode.) Cursor up to the READY prompt and hit RE- 
TURN to generate an '.'OUT OF DATA ERROR, then enter 
PRINT ER%. ER% should be 13. 1 suggest experimenting in 
direct mode, generating various errors. 

Infraraid alone, without setting any parameters in the vari- 
ables, is a handy debugging tool. In direct mode, except for 
setting ER%, Infraraid is transparent, but in program mode 
when an error occurs it will clear the screen and display the 
line where execution stopped. Control is then passed to the 
BASIC error handler which prints the normal error message. 
In most cases, the last character read by BASIC will be dis- 
played in white to highlight it from the rest of the line, which 
is displayed in the normal blue on blue. 

To understand how this works we must know a little bit about 
how BASIC reads text. The CHARGET routine from 115 to 
138 in page zero RAM is a short machine language routine 
that does the actual reading of program text and the vector 
TXTPTR at 122-123 is the address of the next text character. 
The important addresses to Infraraid arc TXTPTR and an- 
other location, CURLIN, at 57-58, which is the current BASIC 
text line number. Infraraid uses CURLIN to find the text line 
and then prints the line character by character. If an address 
of a character matches that of TXTPTR, Infraraid changes 
the color of that character when printed. This is where the 
error occurred and BASIC stopped execution. Note that key- 
words arc stored as one character, and if TXTPTR happens 
to point to it, the whole keyboard will be printed in white when 
expanded to ASCII characters. 

Again, the best way to see this is to do some examples, such 
as 

10 PRINT lOt 100 

when run, Infraraid will clear the screen and print 

10 PRINT ionoo 
70VERFL0W ERROR IN 10 

Continued on page 145 



I 



3I3CGKAM USTINOV 



Attention new Ahoy.' readers! You must read the following information very 

carefully prior to typing in programs listed in Ahoy.' Certain Commodore 

characters, commands, and strings of characters and commands will appear in 

a special format. Follow the instructions and listing guide on this page. 



O" n the following pages you'll find several pro- 
grams that you can enter on your Commo- 
dore computer. But before doing so, read this 
entire page carefully. 

To insure clear reproductions, AhoyFs program listings 
are generated on a daisy wheel printer, incapable of print- 
ing the commands and graphic characters used in Com- 
modore programs. These are therefore represented by 
various codes enclosed in brackets 1 |, For example: the 
SHIFT CLR/HOME command is represented onscreen 
by a heart |g . The code we use in our listings is 
[CLEAR]. The chart below lists all such codes which 
you'll encounter in our listings, except for one other spe- 
cial case. 

The other special case is the COMMODORE and 
SHIFT characters. On the front of most keys are two sym- 
bols. The symbol on the left is obtained by pressing that 
key while holding down the COMMODORE key; the 
symbol on the right, by pressing that key while holding 
down the SHIFT key. COMMODORE and SHIFT char- 
acters arc represented in our listings by a iower-casc V 
or V followed by the symbol of the key you must hit. 
COMMODORE J, for example, is represented by [c Jj, 



and SHIFT J by [s J]. 

Additionally, any character that occurs more than two 
limes in a row will be displayed by a coded listing. For 
example, [3 "[LEFT]"] would be 3 CuRSoR left com- 
mands in a row, [5 *'[s EP]"] would be 5 SHIFTed En- 
glish Pounds, and so on. Multiple blank spaces will be 
noted in similar fashion: e.g., 22 spaces as [22 " "\, 

Sometimes you'll find a program line that's too long 
for the computer to accept (C-64 lines are a maximum 
of 80 characters, or 2 screen lines long; VIC 20 lines, 
a maximum of 88 characters, or 4 screen lines). To en- 
ter these lines, refer to the BASIC Command Abbrevia- 
tions Appendix in your User Manual. 

On the next page you'll find our Bug Repellent pro- 
grams for the VIC 20 and C-64. The version appropri- 
ate for your machine will help you proofread our pro- 
grams after you type them. (Please note: the Bug Repel- 
lent line codes that follow each program line, in the 
whited-out area, should not be typed in. See the instruc- 
tions preceding each program.) 

Also on the following page you will find Flankspeed, ' 
our ML entry program, and instructions on its use. D 

Call Ahoy! at 212-239-0855 with any problems. 



When 








\ini 


VVhi'n 






\bu 


\mi Set' 


ll Muii> 


ViHl Tlpc Will Sec 


Mm Sec 


It'Mrum 


Viiu T>oc Witt See 


[CLEAR] 


Screen ('kill' 


siiin 


CI.KHOMK 


E 


[BLACK] 


Black 


CNTRI. 1 


■ 


[HOME] 


t limit.' 




CI.KItOMF. 


9 


[WHITE] 


W hilc 


CNTRI. 2 


m 


[UP] 


Curwir I'p 


SHIFT 


t CRSR + 


O 


[RED] 


Kit) 


CNTRI. .1 




[DOWN] 


I HIViK ikivtn 




t t'ttSR ♦ 


n 


[CYAN] 


( 'Villi 


CNTRI, 4 


11 


[LEFT] 


( ur«ir Ia-II 


SMIfl 


■*•< KSR» 


El 


[PURPLE] 


I'urplr 


cvmi. 5 


Ii 


[RIGHT] 


CuiMir Kiclit 




*(K.SR-» 


II 


[GREEN] 


(irit'ii 


CNTRI. (1 


□ 


[SS] 


Shifted Splice 


SMUT 


SplRt 


■ 


[BLUE] 


HIlIC 


CNTRI, 7 


in 


[INSERT] 


Insert 


shift 


IYSTDKI. 


n 


[YELLOW] 


VcIhm 


CNTRI. H 


■ 


[DEL] 


Ifckfc 




INSTJ1K] 


ii 


[Fl] 


Function I 


H 


S 


[RVSON] 


Rcvctv On 


(VI Rl, 


y 


w 


[F2] 


Function 2 


shift fi 


■ 


[RVSOFF] 


Reverse < m 


CNTRI. 


(i 


■ 


[F3] 


function .1 


P3 


9 


[UPARROW] 


l p Arrmv 




t 


til; 


[F4] 


Fund 11 111 4 


shift kj 


IB 


[BACKARROW] 


Hack A mm 




* 


it"- 


[F5] 


ll until 111 5 


R 


II 


[PI] 


PI 




X 


m 


[F6] 


1 uikiMin 6 


SHIFT ¥5 


■ 


[EP] 


Knj;Ii>.h HmiihI 




t 


H 


[F7] 
[F8] 


Function 7 
timet ii >ii K 


n 

shift n 

AHOY! 


11 

113 



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may wary in some cities and outside the U.S. 



Reader Service No. 114 



IMPORTANT I Le,lerson wnite background are Bug Repellent 
HVirunimV I . codes and provide other essential informalion on 

BUG REPELLENT 

This program will lei you debug any Ahoy! program. Follow in- 
structions lor VIC 20 (cassette or disk) or C-64. 

VIC 20 VERSION 
By Michael Kleinert and David Barron 

For cassette: type in and save the Bug Repellent program, then 
type RUN 6300<)[RfTURN]SYS 828[RETURN], If you typed the 
program property, it will generate a set of two-letter line codes that 
will match those listed to the right of the respective program tines. 

Once you've got a working Bug Repellent, type in the program 
you wish to cheek. Save it and type the RUN and SYS commands 
listed above once again, then compare the line codes generated to 
those listed in the magazine. If you spot u discrepancy, a typing 
error exists in that line. Important: you must use exactly the same 
spacing as the program in the magazine. Due to memory limitations 
on the VIC. the VIC Bug Repellent will register an error if your 
spacing varies from what's printed. 

You may type SYS 828 as many times as you wish, but if you 
use the cassette lor anything, type RUN 63000 to restore the 
Repellent. 

When your program has been disinfected you may delete all lines 
from 63000 on. (Be sure the program you type doesn't include lines 
above 6300011 

For disk: enter Shi; Repel lent, save it. and type RUN: NEW 
[RETURN). Type in the program you wish to check, then SYS S2K. 

To pause the line codes listing, press SHUT. 

To send the list to the primer type OPEN 4.4:CMI> 4:SVS 
82 8 [ RETURN | . When the cursor comes back, type 
PRlNT#4:CLOSE 4[RETURN|. 

•63000 F0RX=828T0irj23: READY :P0KEX t Y:NEXT:END AC 

•63001 DATA169.0, 133,63,133,64, 165,43, 133,251 JL 

-63002 DATA165,44,133,252,160,O,132,254,32,228DF 

•63003 DATA3, 234, 177, 251, 208, 3, 76, 208, 3, 230 0E 

•63004 DATA251, 208, 2, 230, 252, 169, 244, 160, 3, 32 OH 

•63005 DATA30, 203, 160,0, 177 ,251 , 170,230,251 , 20 

8 K0 

•63006 DATA2, 230, 252, 177, 251 ,32, 205, 22 1,169, 58 J J 

•63007 DATA32, 210, 255, 169,0,133,253,230,254,32 OK 

•63008 DATA228,3,234, 165,253, 160,0, 170, 177,251 LG 

•63009 DATA201.32, 240,6,138,1 13,25 1,69 ,254, 170 BP 

•63010 DATA 138, 133, 253, 177, 25 1,208, 226, 165, 253 

,41 

•6301 1 DATA240, 74 ,74 , 74 , 74 , 24 , 105 , 65, 32 , 210 

•63012 DATA255, 165, 253, 41, 15, 24, 105, 65, 32, 210 

•63013 DATA255, 169, 13,32,210,255,173,141,2,41 

•63014 DAT A 1,208, 249, 230, 63, 208 ,2, 230, 64, 230 

■ 63015 DATA251 , 208 , 2 , 230, 252 , 76 , 74 , 3 , 169, 236 

•63016 DATA16O,3,32,3O,203,166,63,165,64,32 

• 6301 7 DATA205 , 221 , 169 , 13 , 32 , 210, 255 , 96 , 230, 25 

1 EL 

•63018 DATA208, 2,230, 252,96,0,76,73,78,69 01 

•63019 DAT A83, 58, 32, 0,76, 73, 78, 69, 32, 35 FG 

■63020 DATA32, 0,0, 0,0,0 LE 

C-64 VERSION 

By Michael Kleinert and David Barron 

Type in, SAVE, and RUN (he Bug Repellent. Type NEW, ttlCtt 
type in or LOAD the Alio}'! program you wish lo check. When that's 
done. SAVE your program (don't RUN it!) and tvpe SYS 40152 
[ RETURN |. ' 

To pause (he listing depress and hold ihe SHIFT key. 

Compare the codes your 'machine generates to the codes listed 
to the right of the respective program lines. It" you spot a difference, 
an error crisis in thai line. Jot down the number of lines where 

116 AHOY! 



line codes. Do not enter theml This page and page 113 explain these 
entering Ahoy! programs. Read these pages before entering programs. 

contradictious occur, LIST each line, ^pot the error*, and correct 



l)D 
EK 
F0 
PK 
CB 
KH 
DP 



them. 

•5000 
■5001 

• 5002 

■ 5003 
•5004 
•5005 

• 5006 
•5007 

• 5008 

• 5009 
•5010 
■5011 
•5012 
•5013 
•5014 
•5015 
•5016 
•5017 
•5018 
•5019 

■ 5020 
■5021 
•5022 
■5023 

■ 5024 

■ 5025 

■ 5026 

■ 5027 
■5028 
■5029 
■5030 
■5031 

■ 5032 
■5033 
■5034 



FORX=491 52T049488 : READY : POKEX , Y : NEXT : END GJ 
DATA32, 161, 192, 165, 43, 133, 251, 165, 44, 133 DL 



Dl: 
OF 
KN 
CA 
CE 



DATA252, 160,0,132,254,32,37, 193,234,177 
DATA251, 208, 3, 76, 138, 192, 230, 251, 208, 2 
DATA230 , 252 , 76 , 43 , 192 , 76 , 73 , 78 , 69 , 32 
DATA35, 32, 0,169, 35, 160, 192, 32, 30, 171 
DATA160, 0,1 77, 251, 170, 230, 251, 208, 2, 230 
DATA252, 177, 25 1,32, 205, 189, 169, 58, 32', 210 JE 
DATA255, 169, 0,133, 253, 230, 254, 32, 37, 193 CL 
DATA234, 165,253, 160,0, 76, 13, 193, 133,253 NB 
DATA1 77, 251, 208, 237, 165, 253, 41, 240, 74, 74 MB 
DATA74, 74, 24, 105, 65, 32, 210, 255, 165, 253 EP 
DATA41, 15,24, 105,65,32,210,255, 169, 13 
DATA32, 220, 192,230,63, 208, 2,230,64,230 
DATA251, 208, 2, 230, 252, 76, 11, 192, 169, 153 
DATA160, 192, 32, 30, 171, 166, 63, 165, 64, 76 
DATA231, 192,96, 76,73,78,69,83,58,32 
DATA0, 169, 247, 160, 192, 32, 30, 171, 169, 3 
DATA1 33 , 254 , 32 , 228, 255 , 201 , 83, 240 , 6, 201 
DATA80, 208, 24 5, 230, 254, 32, 2 10, 255, 169, 4 
DATA166, 254, 160, 255, 32, 186, 255, 169,0, 133 CL 
DATA63, 133, 64, 133, 2, 32, 189, 255, 32, 192 GC 
DATA255, 166, 254, 32, 201, 255, 76, 73, 193, 96 
DATA32, 210, 255, 173, 141, 2, 41, 1,208, 249 
DATA96.32, 205, 189, 169, 13,32,210,255,32 
DATA204.255, 169,4,76, 195,255, 147,83,67 
DATA82, 69, 69, 78, 32,79,82,32,80,82 
DATA73, 78, 84, 69, 82, 32, 63, 32, 0,76 
DATA44, 193, 234, 177, 251, 201, 32, 240, 6, 138 
DATA1 13, 251, 69, 254, 170, 138, 76, 88, 192,0 
DAT A0, 0,0, 230, 251, 208, 2, 230, 252, 96' 
DATA170, 177, 251, 201, 34, 208, 6, 165 ,2, 73 
DATA255 , 1 33 , 2 , 165 , 2 , 208 , 218 , 1 77 , 251 , 201 
DATA32, 208,212, 198, 254, 76, 29, 193,0, 169 
DATA13, 76, 210, 255, 0,0,0 



GH 
AN 
NG 
BE 
i-T 
PJ 
FK 
Ft 



NN 
Nil 
!'■ 
KC 
DC 
ML 
c;n 
jk 

NA 
DM 
1A 
FM 
PA 



FORTHEC-64 



By Gordon F. Wheat 

Fltiitkspeedvuiii allow you to enter machine language Ahoy! pro- 
grams without any mistakes, Once you have typed (he program in, 
save it for future use While entering an Ml. program wi{b 
Fttmkspcttl there is no need to enter spaces or hit the carriage return. 
This is all done automatically ■ If you make Lin error in a line a hell 
will ring ami you will be asked to enter it again. To LOAD in a 
program Saved with FhtnkspiVtl use LOAD "name". 1.1 Tor tape. 
or LOAD "name". 8.! for disk. The function keys ntay bo used after 
die shining and ending addresses have been entered. 
II SAVEs what you have entered so far, 
13 l.OADs in a program worked on previously. 
t'5-To continue on a line you stopped on alter l.OADing in l he 
previously saved work, 

17 Scans through the program lo locale a particular line, or lo tlnd 
out where you slopped ihe last time you entered the program, 17 
temporarily freezes die outpul as well 

•5 POKE53280,12:POKE53281,ll • LL 

•6 PRINT"(CLEAR][c 8][RVSON][15" "]FLANKSPEED[ 

15" "']"; ED 

•10 PRINT"[RVSON3[5" " JMISTAKEPR00F MI, ENTRY P 

R0GRAM[6" "]" MC 

•15 PR1NT"[RVS0N][9" "]CREATED BY G. F, WHEAT[ 

9" "]" DM 

•20 PRINT"(RVS0N][3" "JC0PR. 1984, ION INTERNA 



TIONAL INC. [3" "]" 

30 FORA=54272T054296:POKEA ,0:NEXT 

40 POKE54272,4:P0KE54273,48:POKE54277,0:POKE5 

4278,249:FOKE54296,15 

70 FORA=680T0699 : READB : POKEA , B: NEXT 

75 DATA169, 251, 166, 253, 164, 254, 32, 216,255, 96. 

76 DATA169, 0,166, 251, 164 ,252, 32, 213, 255, 96 

80 B$="STARTING ADDRESS IN HEX":G0SUB2010:AD= 

B:SR=B 

85 GOSUB2520:IFB=0THEN80 

P0KE251,T(4)+T(3)*16:P0KE252,T(2)+T(1)*16 

B$=" ENDING ADDRESS IN HEX":G0SUB2010:EN=B 

GOSUB2510:IFB=0THEN80 

P0KE254,T(2)+T(1)*16:B=T(4)+1+T(3)*16 

IFB>255THENB=B-255:P0KE254,PEEK(254')+1 

P0KE253,B:PRINT 

REM GET HEX- LINE 

GOSUB3010: PRINT": [c P] [LEFT]" ;: FOR A=0T08 

FORB=0TOl:G0TO210 

NEXTB 

A%(A)=T(1)+T(0)*16:IFAD+A-1=ENTHEN310 

PRINT" [c P][LEFT-]"; 

NEXTA:T=AD-(INT(AD/256)*256) :PRINT" " 

FORA=OT07:T=T+A%(A):IFT>255THENT=T-255 

NEXT 

IFA%(8)OTTHENG0SUB1010:G0T0110 

F0RA=0T07 ; POKEAD+A, A%( A) : NEXT : AD=AD+8 : GOT 



86 

90 

95 

96 

97 

98 

100 

110 

120 

125 

130 

135 

140 

150 

160 

170 

180 

0110 

200 REM 



210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
220 
250 
230 
250 
240 
250 
260 
270 
272 
274 
280 
285 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
1000 



GET HEX INPUT 
GETA$:1FA$=""THEN210 
1FA$=CHR$(20)THEN270 
IFA$=CHR$(133)THEN4000 
IFA$=CHR$(134)THEN41O0 
IFA$=CHR$(135)THENPRINT" 
IFA$=CHR$(136)THENPRINT" 
IFA$>"@"ANDA$<"G li THENT(B) 



":GOT04500 
":GOT04700 
=ASC(A$)-55:GOTO 



IFA$>"/"ANDA$<":"THENT(B)=ASC(A$)-48:G0T0 

GOSUB1100;GOT0210 
PRINTA$"[c P][LEFT]"; 
GOTO 125 
IFA>0THEN280 
A=-1:IFE=1THEN290 
GOTO 140 

IFB=0THENPRINTCHR$(20);CHR$(20);:A=A-1 
A=A-1 

PRINTCHR$(20) ; IG0T0140 
REM LAST LINE 

PRINT" ":T=AD-<INT(AD/256)*256) 
FORB=OTOA-l:T=T+A%(B):IPT>255THENT=T-255 
NEXT 

IFA%(A)OTTHENG0SUB1010:G0T0110 
F0RB=0T0A-1:P0KEAD+B,A%(B):NEXT 
PRINT :PRINT"YOU ARE FINISHED !":G0T04000 
REM BELL AND ERROR MESSAGES 



1010 PRINT: PRINT" LI ME ENTERED INCORRECTLY": PR 
INT:G0TO11OO 

1020 PRINT:PRINT"INPUTA 4 DIGIT HEX VALUE!": 
GOTO 1100 

1030 PRINT: PRINT"ENDING IS LESS THAN STARTING 
!":B=0:G0T01100 

1040 PRINT: PRINT"ADDRESS MOT WITHIN SPECIFIED 
RANGE!":B=0:GOT01100 

1050 PRINT :PRINT"N0T ZERO PAGE OR ROM!":B=0:G 
0T01100 



DH 

IM 

NH 
KO 
HJ 
JB 

HC 
FO 

KE 
IF 
FP 

MN 
GE 
HN 
IL 
FG 
MD 
ME 
LH 
IK 
PD 
LI 
1A 
FK 

MN 
AB 
HO 

GC 
MD 
KF' 
GE 
BJ 

GM 

LE 
LL 
OA 
CG 
OP 
OB 
CJ 
HG 
BE 
KH 
AD 
GJ 
PL 
IA 
KF 
HN 
ON 
FL 

DH 

JA 

HD 

AG 
KN 



1060 PRINT"?ERROR IN SAVE":.GOT01100 

1070 PRINT"?ERROR IN LOAD": GOTO 1100 

1080 PRINT:PRINT;PRINT"END OF ML AREA":PRINT 

1100 POKE54276,17:POKE54276,16:RETURN 

1200 0PEN15,8,15:INPUT#15,A,A$:CL0SE15:PRINTA 

$ : RETURN 

2000 REM GET FOUR DIGIT HEX 

2010 PRINT : PRINTB$ ; :INPUTT$ 

2020 IFLEN(T$)<>4THENGOSUBI020:GOT02010 

2040 F0RA=1TG4 : A$=MID$ (T$ , A , 1 ) : GOSUB2060 : IFT( 

A)=16THENGOSUB1020:GOT02010 

2050 NEXT:B=(T(1)*4096)+(T(2}*256)+(T(3)*16)+ 

T( 4): RETURN 

2060 IFA$>"@"ANDA$<"G"THENT(A)=ASC(A$)-55:RET 

URN 

2070 IFA$>"/"ANDA$<":"THENT(A)=ASC(A$)-48:RET 

URN 

2080 T(A)=16: RETURN 

2500 REM ADRESS CHECK 

2510 IFAD>ENTHEN1030 

2515 IFB<SRORB>ENTHEN1040 

2520 IFB<2560R(B>40960ANDB<49152)ORB>53247THE 

N1050 

2530 RETURN 

REM ADDRESS TO HEX 

AC=AD : A=4096 : GOSUB3070 

A=256:G0SUB3070 

A=16:G0SUB3070 

A=l:GOSUB3070 

RETURN ■ 

T=INT(AC/A):TFT>9THENA$=CHR$(T+55):GOT03 



3000 

3010 

3020 

3030 

3040 

3060 

3070 

090 

3080 A$=CHR$(T+48) 

3090 PRINTA$;:AC=AC-A*T: RETURN 

4000 A$="**SAVE**" :GOSUB4200 

4050 OPEN 1 , T , 1 , A$ : SYS680 : CL0SE1 

4060 IFST=OTHENEND 

4070 GOSUB1060: IFT=8THENG0SUB1200 

4080 GOT04000 

4100 A$="**LOAD**" : G0SUB4200 

4150 0PEN1,T,0,A$:SYS690:CL0SE1 

4160 IFST=64THEN110 

4170 G0SUB1070 : IFT=8THENG0SUB1200 

4180 G0T04100 

4200 PRINT" ":PRINTTAB(14)A$ 

4210 PRINT: A$=" M : INPUT"FILENAME" ; A$ 

4215 IFA$=""THEN4210 

'4220 PRINT :PRINT"TAPE OR DISK?":PRINT ■ 

4230 GETB$:T=1 :IFB$="D"THENT=8:A$="@0:"+A$; 

TURN 



RE 



4240 

4250 

4500 

B 

4510 

4520 

4700 

B 

4705 

4706 



IFB$O"T"THEN4230 
RETURN 
B$="C0NTINUE FROM 



ADDRESS" :GOSUB2010:AD= 



GOSUB25 1 5 : IFB=0THEN4500 

PRINT :GOTOUO , 

B$="BEGIN SCAN AT ADDRESS" :G0SUB2010: AD= 



G0SUB2515 : IFB=0THEN4700 

PRINT :GOT04740 
4710 F0RB=0T07 : AC=PEEK( AD+B) : G0SUB3030: IFAD+B 
=ENTHENAD=SR:G0SUB1080:G0T0110 
4715 PRINT" ";: NEXTB 
4720 PRINT:AD=AD+8 
4730 GETB$:IFB$=CHR$(136)THEN110 
4740 GOSUB3010: PRINT": ";:G0T04710 



EI 
GL 
PG 
BH 

IM 
PC 
GM 
II 

AD'. 

GF 

EH 

KP 
NP 
LI 
MI 
MG 

MI 
IM 
EB 
HG 
CE 
PN 
MJ 
IM 

CJ 
JP 
AC 
AI 
LH 
EO 
FJ 
FF, 
AB 
MF 
JII 
CM 
FO 
FG 
OM 
GF 
DF 

IG 
FN 
IM 

DK 
MA 
01 

FH 
NK 
DI 

BK 
EC 
GN 
MN 
JD 



AHOY! U7 



IMPORTANT I Le " ers P, wh ; , 1 _ e background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter them! Pages 113 and 116 explain these codes 



and provide other essential information on entering Ahoy! programs. Refer to these pages before entering any programs! 



TALKING CLOCK 

FROM PACE 38 

1 PRINT'TCI FAR 1" 

2 PRINT SPCny'tg^DOWNr^TIME" 

3 PRINT SPC(9)"[4"[D0WN]"]BY" 

4 PRINT SPC( 2) "[DOWN] ISAAC MICHALOWSKI" 

5 PRINT SPC( 6) "[DOWN] [DOWN] 12/09/83" 

6 PRINT "[DOWN] [DOWN] MOD, FOR THE C64/1 
28" 

7 PRINT SPC(9)"[D0WN][D0WN]BY" 

8 PRINT SPC(2)"[DOWN]M0RTON KEVELSON" 

9 PRINT SPC(6)"[D0WN][D0WN] 5/17/85" 

10 FQRX=1T0800:NEXTX 

14 PRINT" [CLEAR]" 

15 DIMA$(6) 

20 PRINT "[4"[D0WN]"][7"[RIGHT]"][GREEN] 
[RVSON]TIME SET[RVSOFF] M 
25 PRINT" [ DOWN ][ DOWN ][ 4" [ RIGHT ]"]24 HOUR 

FORMAT" 
30 PRINT" [ RIGHT ] [ RIGHT ] [ 6" [ DOWN ] " ] [RIGHT 
] ENTER TIME IN THE" 

35 PRINT"[3"[RIGHT]"]FOLLOWING MANNER", 
40 PRINT" [DOWN] [DOWN] [6" [RIGHT]"] [YELLOW 
]HH=HOURS" 

44 PRINT"[GREEN][6"[RIGHT]"]MM=MIUTES" 

45 PRINT" [6" [RIGHT]" ][ WHITE ]SS=SECONDS" 
50 PRINT" [ RIGHT ] [ RIGHT ] [ DOWN ] [ DOWN ] [ YELL 
OW ]HH[ GREEN ]MM [WHITE ]SS" 

55 INPUTA$ 

56 IFMID$(A$ , 7 , 7)=>"0"THEN3050 
60 IF A$>"235959"G0T03000 
65 TI$=A$ 

70 PRINT SPC( 8) "RUNNING" 
120 SP(1)= 31 :SP(2)= 24 
130 DRT=37136 : DDR=37138: DFl=37149 :DCB=37 
148: REM FOR VIC-20 

135 REM: DRT=56577:DDR=56579:DFL=56578:D 
CB=56576:REM FOR C-64/128 
140 POKE DDR, 127 

150 A=PEEK(DCB)AND 15: REM FOR VIC-20 
155 REM: A=PEEK(DFL)OR 4: REM FOR C-64/12 
8 

160 
165 
170 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
261 
265 
266 



PQKE(DCB),160 OR A:REM FOR VIC-20 

REM: PQKE(DFL),A:REM FOR C-64/128 

REM: GOSUB 31 10: REM FOR C-64/128 

REM**STRIP TIME** 

A$=LEFT$(TI$,2) 

A=VAL(A$) 

REM**STRIP MINUTES** 

B$=MID$(TI$,3,2) 

B=VAL(B$) 

z=o 

T-0 

IF A<21 THEN Z=1:GOT0330 
T=0 



HH 
KN 
OB 
LT 

JC 

PC 
LO 
JF 
KO 

BP 
HH 
HG 

FJ 

PN 

CL 
LM 

JE 

HL 
IE 

LF 
PH 
PE 

..]() 
NK 
CB 
JN 

PD 

KG 
DA 
CB 

LA 
KL 
GC 
AN 
BO 
DK 
HB 
NM 
KJ 
HH 
EH 
DB 
DL 
DB 



270 IF A=21 THEN A1=1:T=A:G0T0320 
280 IF A=22 THEN A1=2:T=A:G0T0320 
290 IF A=23 THEN Al=3:T=A:GOT0320 
320 A=20 

330 REM**CHECK MINUTES** 
340 IF B=0 GOTO 1000 
350 IFB<10 THEN 
360 IF B=50 THEN 
370 IF B>50 THEN 
380 IF B=40 THEN 
390 1 1- B>40 THEN 
400 IF B=30 THEN 
410 IF B>30 THEN 
IF B>20 THEN 



BUB:B=0:GOT01040 
B=23: GOTO 1080 
B1=B-50:B=23:GOT01040 
B=22:GOT01080 
BUB-40:B=22: GOTO 1040 
B=21: GOTO 1080 
Bl=B-30:B=21:GOT()i040 
Bl=B-20:B=20:GOTO1040 



420 

430 GOTO 1080 

1000 REM**TOP OF HOUR** 

L010 IF T<21ANDA<21THEN SP(3)=A:SP(4)=29 

:SP(5)=33:N=3:GOT02000 

1020 SP(3)=A:SP(4)=A1:SP(5)=29:SP(6)=33: 

N=4:G0T02000 

1030 GOTO 2000 

1040 REM**S0UND FORMAT MINUTES** 

1050 IF Z=l THEN SP(3)=A:SP(4)=27:SP(5)= 

B:SP(6)=BI:SP(7)=28:N=5:G0T02000 

1060 SP(3)=A:SP(4)=Al:SP(5)=27:SP(6)=B 

:SP(7)=B1:SP(8)=28:N=6 

1070 GOTO 2000 

1080 REM**SOUND FORMAT MINUTES10.20, 30,4 

0,50 ONLY** 

1090 IF Z=l THEN SP(3)=A:SP(4)=27:SP(5)= 

B:SP(6)=28:N=4:GGTO 2000 

1100 SP(3)=A:SP(4)=A1:SP(5)=27:SP(6)=B:S 

P(7)=28:N=5:G0T0 2000 

2000 REM**SPEAK!!** 

2010 FOR X=l TO N+2 

2020 IF PEEK(DRT)>127 GOTO 2020 

2030 POKE DRT.SP(X) 

2035 G0SUB3100 

2040 NEXT X ' 

2050 REM**TOP OF MINUTE** 

2060 C$=RIGHT$(TI$,2) 

2070 C=VAL(C$) 

2080 IF C=00 GOTO 200 

2090 GOTO 2060 

3000 REM** ERROR MESSAGE** 

3010 PRINT"[CLEAR]TIME SET IS GREATER[3" 

"]THAN 235959" 
3030 F0RE=1T03500:NEXTE 
3040 PRINT" [ CLEAR ] " : G0T030 
3050 PRINT"[CLEAR]ENTER ONLY 6 DIG ITS" :G 
0TO3020 

3100 REM POKE DCB,PEEK(DCB)AND25i :REM FO 
R C-64/128 

3110 REM POKE DCB,PEEK(DCB)0R4:REM FOR C 
-64/128 
3120 REM RETURN: REM FOR C-64/128 



KD 
PP 
AP 
FE 
MK 
PH 
CM 
JF 
EJ 
J J 
FG 
HB 
DD 
EA 
FK 
BD 

NM 

EI 
EP 
[J 

CL 

BF 
EP 

GF 

Mil 

KG 
PC 
IH 
BN 
BF 
FF 
NK 
KG 
DN 
HN 
AL 
FB 
PG 

J A 
CN 
KB 

Nil 

AB 

JJ 
HG 



118 AHOY! 



AHOY! BABBLER 

FROM PAGE 38 



THE MAGICAL LIHK 



vic 20 demo FROM PAGE 20 



RS-232 RECEIVER 



■10 REM **** AHOY! SPEAKS **** PN 

■20 REM ****VIC-20 VERSION**** DG 

•30 REM BY **M0RT0N KEVELSON** KJ 
•130 DRT=37136:DDR=37138:DFL=37149:DCB=37 

148: REM VIC-20 USER PORT LM 
•140 POKE DDR,127:REM SET DDR FOR OUTPUT ID 

■150 A=PEEK(DCB)AND15 OF 

•160 P0KE(DCB),160 OR A: REM SET BIT 2 FOR 

INPUT OH 

•165 GOSUB 3110 FP 

•2000 REM**SPEAK!!** PC 

•2010 FOR 1=1 TO 17 MC 

■2015 READ X OF 

■2020 IF PEEK(DRT)>127 GOTO 2020 NM 

■2030 POKE DRT.X BH 

•2035 GOSUB3100 FF 

■2040 NEXT I: END IM 

•3100 POKE DCB,PEEK(DCB')AND251:REM SET CO 

NTROL LINE LOW, UTTER ALLOPHONE NE 

■3110 POKE DCB, PEEK (DCB)0R4: REM SET CONTR 

OL LINE HIGH, READY FOR NEXT JM 

•3120 RETURN IM 

•3999 REM ALLOPHONE DATA GM 

•4000 DATA 23,27,5,3 FD 

■4010 DATA 8,24,16,24,33,58,3 AK 

■4020 DATA 25,31,43,52,55,3 MK 



C-64/128 DEMO 



10 REM **** AHOY! SPEAKS **** DP 

20 REM ***C-64/128 VERSION*** MJ 

30 REM **BY MORTON KEVELSON** MM 
130 DRT=56577 : DDR=56579 : DFL=56578 : DCB=56 

576 -.REM C-64 USER PORT FA 

140 POKE DDR ,127: REM SET DRT FOR OUTPUT JA 

150 A=PEEK(DFL)OR 4 ME 

160 POKE(DFL),A:REM SET BIT 2 FOR INPUT PA 

165 GOSUB 3110 FE 

2000 REM**SPEAK!!** PC 

2010 FOR 1=1 TO 17 MK 

2015 READ X OD 

2020 IF PEEK(DRT)>127 GOTO 2020 BN 

2030 POKE DRT,X BB 

2035 G0SUB3100 FF 

2040 NEXT I: END IK 
3100 POKE DCB,PEEK(DCB)AND251:REM SET CO 

NTROL LINE LOW, UTI"ER ALLOPHONE DF 
3110 POKE DCB,PEEK<DCB)0R4:REM SET CONTR 

OL LINE HIGH, READY FOR NEXT HH 

3120 RETURN IM 

3999 REM ALLOPHONE DATA EN 

4000 DATA 23,27,5,3 EH 
4010 DATA 8,24,16,24,33,58,3 PN 
4020 DATA 25,31,43,52,55,3 LP 



30000 REM -=— —- «- «- =-o-=-=— _«— =- KC 

30001 REM - RS-232 RECEIVER - KF 

30002 REM RUPERT REPORT #25 OM 

30003 REM =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= NC 

30004 REM RECEIVE AN ASCII PROGRAM FROM FM 

30005 REM THE RS-232 PORT INTO MEMORY LM 

30006 REM =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= NC 

30030 PRINT CHRSC147); JL 

30040 OPEN 2,2,0,CHR$(8)+CHR$(0) NG 

30050 REM - GET UP TO 80 CHARACTERS - IN 

30060 GOSUB 30120 JB 

30070 PRINT L$ AI 

30080 PRINT "RUN 3[4"0"]" PB 
30090 POKE 631,19 : POKE 632,13 : POKE 6 

33,13 : POKE 198,3 :REM FILL KBD BUFFER JH 

30100 CLOSE 2 : END JB 

30110 REM == GET UP TO 80 CHARACTERS == MG 

30120 GET#2,C$ : IF C$="" THEN 30120 GN 

30130 IF C$=CHR$(13) THEN 30160 OM 
30140 IF C$=CHR$(26) THEN PRINT#2 : CLOS 

E 2 : GOTO 30180 GG 

30150 L$=L$+C$ : GOTO 30120 HN 

30160 L$=LEFT$(L$,79) EG 

30170 RETURN IM 

30180 REM DELETE LINES OF THIS PROGRAM EK 
30190 FOR N=30000 TO 30200 STEP 10 :PRIN 

T N : NEXT PC 
30200 PRINT"PRESS <H0ME> AND 21 <RETURNS 

> TO DELETE THESE LINES"; KA 



ASCII TRANSMITTER 



■2 REM - ASCII TRANSMITTER - OA 

-3 REM RUPERT REPORT #25 OM 

■5 REM TRANSMIT ASCII FORM OF PROGRAM IC 

•6 REM OVER THE RS-232 CHANNEL PA 

•8 OPEN 2,2,0,CHR$(8) : CMD 2 : LIST LO 

•9 PRINTS, CHR$( 26) ;PRINT#2: CLOSE 2: END FJ 
•10 REM -ADD THIS PROGRAM TO THE PROGRAM 

TO BE TRANSMriTED AND TYPE 'RUN 8' ID 

•11 REM -WHEN THE LISTING IS DONE, PG 

•12 REM -TYPE 'RUN 9' TO CLOSE THE FILE DE 



SEQUENTIAL TRANSMITTER 



•20 REM - SEQUENTIAL TRANSMITTER - NM 

•30 REM RUPERT REPORT #25 OM 

■50 REM TRANSMIT A SEQUENTIAL FILE GC 

■60 REM TO THE RS-232 PORT LI 



AHOri 119 



IMPORTANT I Letlerson white background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter them! Pages 113 and 116 explain these codes 
1 1 VI r Uri mil I • and provide other essential information on entering Ahoy! programs. Refer to these pages before entering any programs! 



80 PRINT CHR$(147) 

90 OPEN 2,2,0,CHR$(8)+CHR$(0) 

100 PRINT"ENTER THE -FILENAME- OF THE 

110 PR INT' 'SEQUENTIAL FILE TO BE SENT" 

120 INPUT F$ 

130 OPEN 8 J 8,8 f F$+'\SEQ t R" 

HO GET#8, C$ : IF C$="" THEN 140 

150 SS=ST 

160 PRINT#2,C$; 

170 IF ASC(C$)<32 OR ASC(C$)>127 THEN C$ 

_•!*!• 

180 PRINT C$; 
190 IF SS=0 THEN 140 
200 PRINT#2,CHR$(26) 
: CLOSE 8 



:REM NOT EOF 
PRINT#2 : CLOSE 



NC 
FG 
NG 
IP 
HK 
BF 
BO 
HG. 
AJ 
KC 

BK 
GA 
MK 

NG 



SEQUENTIAL RECEIVER 



- SEQUENTIAL RECEIVER - 
RUPERT REPORT #25 

RECEIVE A SEQUENTIAL FILE 
FROM THE RS-232 PORT 



10 REM 
20 REM 
30 REM 
40 REM 
50 REM 
60 REM 

80 PRINT CHR$(147) 
90 OPEN 2,2,0, CHR$(8)+CHR$(0) 
100 GET#2,J$ ;IF (ST AND 8)«0 THEN 100 
: REM CLEAR THE RECEIVE BUFFER 
110 PRINT"SEND FILE TO (1) PRINTER, (2) 
DISK, OR (3) SCREEN" : INPUT A$ 
120 N=VAL(A$) 
130 ON N GOTO 150,160,180 
140 GOTO 110 : REM TRY AGAIN 
150 OPEN 1,4,4 : GOTO 190 :REM PRINTER 
160 INPUT'SAVE WITH WHAT FILENAME" ;F$ 
170 OPEN 1,8,8,F$+'\S,W" : GOTO 190 
180 OPEN 1,3 :REM SCREEN 
190 REM - RECEIVE DATA - 
200 GET#2,C$ : IF C$-"" THEN 200 
210 PRINTI1, C$; 
220 IF C$OCHR$(26) THEN 200 
230 PRINT#1 : CLOSE 1 
240 CLOSE 2 : END 



NC 
BL 
OM 
NC 
MH 
DK 
NC 
FG 
NG 

HP 

LI) 
JO 
JE 
HN 
NB 
LF 
MP 
LH 
DA 
OK 
KD 
PD 
NE 
JB 



FROM PAGE 72 



•2 REM THE MARTIAN MONSTERS OG 

•3 REM BY J.C.HILTY LE 

■5 POKE 52,48:P0KE 56,48 iC 

•10 S=54272:FORL=STOS+24:POKEL,0:NEXT JM 

■40 V=53248 AD 
•200 PRINT" [CLEAR]": POKE 53280, 0: POKE 532 

81,0 OD 

120 AHOY! 



•220 PRINT" [ HOME ][ CYAN ][ 3" [ DOWN ]"]T H E[3 

" "]M A R T I A N[3" "]M N S T E R S" 
•230 PRINT 
•240 PRINT TAB(14)"tRED][RVS0N] [ RVSOFF ][ 

6" "] [RVSON] " 
•250 PRINT TAB(15)"[RVS0N] [RVSOFF] [4" "] 

[RVSON] " 
-260 PRINT TAB(9)"[ BLUE] [RVSON] [RVSOFF] 

[RVSON] [RVSOFF] [4" "] [RED] [RVSON] [RVSO 

FF] [RVSON] " 
•270 PRINT TAB(9)"[ BLUE] [RVSON] [3" "][RVS 

0FF][3" "] [GREEN] [RVSON] [6" "] [RVSOFF] [5 

" "][BLUE][RVSON] " 
•280 PRINT TAB(10)"[ BLUE] [RVSON] [RVSOFF] 

[3" "] [GREEN] [RVSON] [8" "] [RVSOFF] [ 4" "] 

[BLUE] [RVSON] " 
•290 PRINT TAB( 10) "[BLUE] [RVSON] [3" "][GR 

EEN][4" "] [RVSOFF] [RVSON] [RVSOFF] [ RVS 

0N][3" "][BLUE][4" "]" 
■300 PRINT TAB( 13) "[GREEN] [RVSON] [10" "][ 

RVSOFF] [3" "] [BLUE] [RVSON] " 
•310 PRINT TAB( 14) "[GREEN] [RVSON] [8" "]" 
•320 PRINT TAB{ 15) "[GREEN] [RVSON] [6" "]" 
•330 PRINT TAB(16)"[BLUE][RVS0N] [RVSOFF] 

[3" "] [RVSON] " 
•340 PRINT TAB( 16)" [RVSON] [RVSOFF] [3" "] 

[RVSON] " 
•350 PRINT TAB(15)"[RVS0N][3" "] [RVSOFF] 

[RVSON] [3" "]" 
■360 PRINT 
•370 PRINT TAB(2)"[CY AN] [3". "I SPACESHIPS 

ARE OUR FAVORITE F00D[3"."]" 
•380 PRINT 
•390 PRINT TAB(4)"[3"."]AND WE ARE GETTIN 

G HUNGRY [3"."]" 
•405 POKE S+24,15:P0KE S+1,15:P0KE S+5,16 

:POKE S+6,240:P0KE S+4,21 
•420 FOR T=l TO 3 
•425 R=10 
•430 POKE S+15.R 
•450 R=R+1:IF R=200 THEM 470 
■460 GOTO 430 
•470 NEXT T 

•480 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I,0:NEXT 
• 520 PRINT" [ CLEAR ] " : PRINT" [ 4" [ DOWN ] " ] "TAB 

(4) "PLEASE WAIT FOR ONE MOMENT [3"."]" 
•521 PRINT:PRINT".. WHILE WE WORK UP AN AP 

PETITE FOR YOU.." 



OG 
JJ 

OK 

KO 



JA 



i 



LN 



NO 



READ 



■525 FOR X=50880 TO 51116 

:NEXT 
■530 FOR X=49152 TO 49528 

:NEXT 
■535 FOR X=12288 TO 12671 

:NEXT 

540 POKE 49522,1: POKE 49523,0: POKE 49524 

,30; POKE 49525,0: POKE 49526,23 



READ 
READ 



A:P0KE X,A 
A:POKE X.A 
A:POKE X,A 



NG 

KM 
FA 
BK 

10 

GO 

KK 
JJ 

CJ 
JJ 

PL 

HG 
KB 
GK 
HB 
MH 
CH 
NG 
1)1 

HL 

JJ 

ND 
LP 
JI 
J A 









554 PRINT"[CLEAR]" 

555 FOR P=0 TO 18 

560 T$="":FOR 1-0 TO 30:T«32 
570 IF INT(RND(2)*7)<1 THEN T=46:IF INT( 
RND(2)*5)<1 THEN T=42 
580 T$»T$+CHR$(T):NEXT I 
590 T$=T$+CHR$(170) 
600 PRINT T$ 
610 NEXT P 

620 PRINT" [ RED ][RVSON] [c *][RVS0FF][9" 
"][RVSON][sEP] [c *][RVSOFF] [RVSON][sE 
P] [c *][RVS0FF][11" "][RVSON][sEP] M 
630 PRINT M [RVS0N][4" "][c *][RVSOFF] [R 
VS0N][sEP] [c *][sEP][ll" "][c *][RVSOFF 
] [RVSON][sEP] [c *][RVSOFF] [RVSON][sEP 

] " 

640 PRINT" [RVS0N][ 31" "]" 

650 PRINT" [RVS0N][ 31" "]" 

652 PRINT" [HOME]": PRINT TAB(34)"[GREEN]T 

HE" 

653 

654 

655 

E" 

656 

660 



HH 
MB 
CO 

DD 
LN 

AN 
BA 
NC 



NN 



PRINT TAB(32) "MARTIAN" 

PRINT TAB( 32) "MONSTERS" 

PRINT" [ 4" [ DOWN ] " ] " : PRINTTAB( 33) "SCOR 



PR 



: PRINT" [ 1 0" [ DOWN ]"] ,f TAB 

:PRINT"[17"[D0WN]"]"TAB 



PRINT:PRINT: PRINT TAB(33)"SHIPS" 
PRINT: PRINT: PRINT TAB(33)"MISSED" 

INT TAB(33)"SH0TS" 

662 SC=0:SH=5:MS-0 

665 PRINT" [HOME]": PRINT" [13" [DOWN]"] "TAB 
(34)SH 

666 PRINT" [HOME]" 
(34)SC 

667 PR I NT" [HOME]" 
(34)MS 

669 REM PREPARE SPRITES 

POKE 2040, 193: POKE 2041,194 
FOR T=2042 TO 2046 
POKE T.192 
NEXT T 

POKE V+39,l:POKE V+40,10:P0KE V+41,5 
:POKE V+42,4 

685 POKE V+28,l;POKE V+37,6:POKE 
POKE V+43,7:POKE V+44,8:POKE 
X0=140:Y0=160 
POKE V+0,XO:P0KE V+l.YO 

V+4,35:POKE V+5,60 

V+6,85:POKE V+7,60 

V+8, 135: POKE V+9,60 

V+10, 185: POKE V+11,60 

V+12, 235: POKE V+13,60 

V+21,125 

504 3 7,0: POKE 50438,255 

504 39,0 -.POKE 50440,2 

50441,0: POKE 50442,254 

50443,0: POKE 50444,1 

50445,0: POKE 50446,253 

50435,0: POKE 50436,255 

50432,124 



672 
674 
675 
676 
680 



690 
700 
710 
720 
730 
740 
750 
760 
765 
770 
780 
790 
800 

810 
815 
820 



V+38,2 
V+45,6 



POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 
POKE 



GG 
HG 
HG 

AG 
BC 
IK 

KH 

FH 

BE 

NO 

OL 

EK 

CG 
KJ 
KP 
NK 
LL 
NG 

DD 

AC 

LLj 

OJ 

CL 

BG 

OB 

DP 

JL 

HF 

LO 

FM 

CC 

LB 

DI 

LC 

LE 

GO 



830 SYS 51104 KF 

840 REM MAIN LOOP PK 

850 POKE V+0,XO:POKE V+l.YO CL 

860 X0=X0+5:IF X0>250 THEN X0=30 HI 

870 JY-PEEK ( 56321 )AND15 HM 
880 IF JY=13THENY0=YO+4:IF Y0>205 THEN Y 

0=205 JA 
890 IF JY=14 THEN Y0=Y0-4:IF Y0<70 THEN 

Y0=70 NN 
900 FB=-((PEEK(56321)AND16)=0):IF FB=1 T 

HEN 2000 PB 

910 W=PEEK(V+30) HN 

920 IF W«5 THEN 0=2042: GOTO 3000 OD 

930 IF W=9 THEN Q=2043:G0T0 3000 AA 

940 IF W-17 THEN Q=2044:GOT0 3000 PA 

950 IF W=33 THEN Q=2045:GOT0 3000 ED 

960 IF W=65 THEN 0=2046 -.GOTO 3000 PF 

965 SYS 49152 KF 

970 GOTO 850 DB 

2000 REM FIRE LASER DI 

2005 POKE 50432,0 AG 

2010 POKE V+2,X0:POKE V+3.YO-12 GG 

2015 POKE V+21,127 LM 

2020 POKE 50432,2 AI 

2030 IF PEEK(V+3)<55 THEN 2500 EL 

2035 Wl=PEEK(V+30) ME 

2040 IF Wl=6 THEN Q=2042:G0T0 2600 NK 

2050 IF Wl=10 THEN Q= 2043: GOTO 2600 ED 

2060 IF Wl-18 THEN Q=2044:GOT0 2600 IM 

2070 IF Wl=34 THEN 0=2045: GOTO 2600 DD 

2080 IF Wl=66 THEN Q=2046:GOTO 2600 KB 

2090 GOTO 2030 FE 

2499 REM MISSED SHOT JJ 

2500 MS=MS+1 MA 
2505 PRINT" [HOME]": PRINT" [ 17" [ DOWN ]"]"TA 
B(34)MS CG 
2510 POKE V+21,125 LO 

2530 POKE V+23,124:POKE V+29,124 JL 

2531 P=195 KH 

2532 FOR T=l TO 8 KE 

2533 FOR Z-2042 TO 2046 NA 

2534 POKE Z.P HA 

2535 NEXT Z NM 

2536 P.P+1:IF P=197 THEN P=195 OB 

2537 POKE S+5,9:POKE S+6,0:P0KE S+24,15 II 

2538 POKE S+1,80:POKE S, 15: POKE S+4,33 OF 

2539 FOR E=0 TO 50: NEXT E LE 

2540 POKE S+4,32 FM 

2541 NEXT T NG 

2542 Wl=PEEK(V+30) ME 

2543 FOR Z-2042 TO 2046: POKE Z,192:NEXT JC 

2544 POKE V+23,0:P0KE V+29,0 CH 

2545 POKE 50432,124 GO 
2548 IF MS=5 THEN 7000 JA 
2550 GOTO 850 DB 

2599 REM LASER HITS MARTIAN GI 

2600 SC=SC+100 CN 
2602 PRINT" [ HOME ] " : PRINT" [ 10" [ DOWN ] " ] "TA 

AHOY! W 



B(33)SC EL 

2605 POKE V+2 1,125 LO 

2606 POKE 0,197 LB 
2608 GOSUB 3500 FB 

2630 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I t O:NEXT DI 

2631 POKE S+24,15: POKE S+1,15:P0KE S+5,1 

6 KG 

2632 POKE S+6, 240: POKE S+4,21 DK 

2633 R=80 HF 

2634 POKE S+15.R HB 

2635 R=R+1:IF R=160 THEN 2640 PK 

2636 GOTO 2634 FG 
2640 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I,0:NEXT DI 
2642 POKE Q.192 KK 
2650 Wl=PEEK(V+30) ME 
2655 POKE 50432,124 GO 
2660 GOTO 850 DB 
3000 REM MARTIAN EATS SPACESHIP EA 
3005 POKE 50432,0 AG 
3010 IF Q=2042 THEN POKE V+29,4*P0KE V+2 
3,4 OG 
3020 IF Q=2043 THEN POKE V+29,8:P0KE V+2 
3,8 EF 
3030 IF Q=2044 THEN POKE V+29,16:P0KE V+ 
23,16 AB 
3040 IF Q=2045 THEN POKE V+29,32:P0KE V+ 
23,32 CC 
3050 IF 0=2046 THEN POKE V+29,64:P0KE V+ 
23,64 HP 
3060 POKE 2040,197 DK 
3070 GOSUB 3500 FB 
3080 POKE V+21,124 LP 
3090 P=195 KH 
3100 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I,0:NEXT DI 
3110 POKE S+5,9:P0KE S+6, 0: POKE S+24,15 II 
3120 FOR T=l TO 8 KE 
3130 POKE Q,P GH 
3140 P=P+1:IF P=197 THEN P=195 OB 
3150 POKE S+1,80:P0KE S, 15: POKE S+4,33 OF 
3160 FOR E=0 TO 50:NEXT E LE 
3170 POKE S+4,32 FM 
3180 NEXT T NG 
3190 SH=SH-1 ML 
3195 PRINT" [HOME]": PRINT" [ 13" [ DOWN ]"] M TA 
B(34)SH OL 
3200 POKE 2040,193 DG 
3210 POKE Q.192 KK 
3212 POKE V+29,0:P0KE V+23,0 CH 
3215 XO=160:Y0=140 OB 
3220 POKE V+0,X0:POKE V+l.YO CL 
3230 POKE V+21,125 LO 
3240 POKE V+8, 135: POKE V+9,60 DP 
3260 POKE 50432,124 GO 
3265 W=PEEK(V+30) HN 
3268 IF SH=0 THEN 7000 IE 
3270 GOTO 965 DC 

3499 REM EXPLOSION SOUND OM 

3500 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I,0:NEXT DI 



3510 POKE S+24,15: POKE S+12, 160: POKE S+l 
3,252 FC 

3520 POKE S+8,80:P0KE S+7,40:P0KE S+11,1 
29 . GN 

3530 FOR T=0 TO 100: NEXT LC 

3540 POKE S+11,1 28 OB 

3550 RETURN IM 

4000 REM ML SPRITE ROUTINE BE 

4010 DATA 169,255,45,0,198,240,16,169,0, 
141,0,198,162,21,189,0 UN 

4020 DATA 197,157,0,198,202,208,247,162, 
1,169,1,141,80,197,173,80 KK 

4030 DATA 197,45,0,197,240,3,76,243,198, 
232,232,14,80,197,208,238 OJ 

4040 DATA 76,49,234,169,0,29,0,197,208,3 
,76,97,199,169,128,61 CC 

4050 DATA 0,197,240,48,254,0,198,208,40, 
222,255,207,76,144,199,80 LE 

4060 DATA 197,45,16,208,208,12,173,16,20 
8,13,80,197,141,16,208,76 NB 

4070 DATA 43,199,173,16,208,77,80,197,14 
1,16,208,189,0,197,157,0 00 

4080 DATA 198,76,97,199,222,0,198,208,40 
, 254 , 255 , 207 , 208 ,29,173, 80 AB 

4090 DATA 197,45,16,208,208,12,173,16,20 
8,13,80,197,141,16,208,76 NB 

4100 DATA 91,199,173,16,208,77,80,197,14 
1,16,208,189,0,197,157,0 CD 

4110 DATA 198,169,0,232,29,0,197,208,3,7 
6,140,199,169,128,61,0 PO 

4120 DATA 197,240,11,254,0,198,208,20,22 
2,255,207,76,134,199,222,0 KC 

4130 DATA 198,208,9,254,255,207,189,0,19 
7,157,0,198,202,76,233,198 FP 

4140 DATA 169,255,221,255,207,240,3,76,4 
3,199,173,80,197,76,17,199 BD 

4150 DATA 120,169,192,141,20,3,169,198,1 
41,21,3,88,96 JL 

5000 REM SCROLL DATA GJ 

5010 DATA 174,114,193,224,3,144,3,76,117 
,192,188,114,193,140,121,193,174 GI 
5020 DATA 118,193,232,202,32,30,193,172, 
121,193,173,119,193,201,2,208,10 EI, 
5030 DATA 169,32,72,173,33,208,72,76,50, 
192,177,90,72,177,92,72,204 CN 

5040 DATA 116,193,240,20,200,177,90,72,1 
77,92,136,145,92,104,145,90,200 CI 
5050 DATA 204,116,193,208,238,240,18,136 
,177,90,72,177,92,200,145,92,104 AK 
5060 DATA 145,90,136,204,115,193,208,238 
,173,119,193,201,0,208,5,104,104 KD 
5070 DATA 76,111,192,104,145,92,104,145, 
90,236,117,193,208,160,96,172,116 OJ 
5080 DATA 193,200,189,114,193,170,32,30, 
193,173,120,193,201,2,208,19,136 OP 
5090 DATA 169,32,153,122,193,173,33,208, 
153,162,193,204,115,193,208,239,240 KB 
5100 DATA16, 136, 177, 90, 153, 122, 193, 177, 9 



U2 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT! Letters on wni ' e background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter them! Pages 113 and 116 explain these codes 



and provide other essentia! information on entering Ahoy! programs. Refer to these pages before entering any programs! 

CE 



2,153,162,193,204,115,193,208,240 

5110 DATA 236,117,193,240,37,202,32,30,1 

93,172,116,193,200,136,177,90,72 

5120 DATA 177,92,32,48,193,145,92,104,14 

5,90,32,56,193,204,115,193,208 

5130 DATA 234,236,117,193,208,221,240,46 

,202,206,118,193,232,32,30,193,172 

5140 DATA 116,193,200,136,32,48,193,177, 

90,72,177,92,32,56,193,145,92 

5150 DATA 104,145,90,204,115,193,208,234 

,236,118,193,208,221,238,118,193,232 

5160 DATA 32,30,193,173,120,193,201,0,24 

0,20,172,115,193,136,200,185,162 

5170 DATA 193,145,92,185,122,193,145,90, 

204,116,193,208,240,96,189,89,193 

5180 DATA 133,91,24,105,212,133,93,189,6 

4,193,133,90,133,92,96,72,152 

5190 DATA 24,105,40,168,104,96,72,152,56 

,233,40,168,104,96,0,40,80 

5200 DATA 120,160,200,240,24,64,104,144, 

184,224,8,48,88,128,168,208,248 

5210 DATA 32,72,112,152,192,4,4,4,4,4,4, 

4,5 5,5,5,5 

5220 DATA'S, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 3,0, 

4,0 

5230 DATA 4,1,1 

5232 REM MONSTER DATA 

5235 DATA 6,0,96,3,0,192,1,129,128,0,195 

,0,0,126,0,0,255,0 

5240 DATA 1,255,128,3,255,192,227,255,19 

9,63,221 

5244 DATA 252,227,255,199,3,255,192,1,25 

5,128 

5248 DATA 0,255,0,0,66,0,0,66,0,0,231,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

5250 REM ROCKET MULTICOLOR DATA 

5260 DATA 0,32,0,0,32,0,0,32,0,0,168,0,0 

,168,0,1,169,0,5,169,64 HI 

5270 DATA 21,169,80,85,169,84,0,168,0,0, 

168,0,0,168,0,0,168,0,3,255,0 

5280 DATA 15,255,192,63,255,240,15,255,1 

92,0,48,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

5290 REM LASER DATA 

5300 DATA 0,56,0,0,56,0,0,56,0,0,56,0,0, 

56,0,0,56,0,0,56,0,0,56,0 

5310 DATA 0,56,0,0,56,0,0,56,0,0,56,0,0, 

56,0 MJ 

5320 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 NH 

5330 REM GOBBLE DATA 

5340 DATA 3,0,0,1,128,0,0,192,0,0,60,0,0 

,126,0,0,255,0,1,247,224 

5350 DATA 1,255,224,1,252,0,1,248,0,0,24 

8,0,0,120,0,0,60,0 

5360 DATA 0,39,192,0,35,192,0,32,0,0,112 



MG 
HJ 

GF 

IC 

AL 

DK 

EP 

IA 

LL 

LK 

JG 

LE 
HP 
OM 

OD 
HF 
HI 

GI 

KD 



FB 

AP 
CE 

PG 



GP 
OC 
IC 



,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

5370 REM MORE GOBBLE DATA 

5380 DATA 3,0,0,1,128,0,0,192,0,0,60,0,0 

,126,0,0,255,0,1,247,128 

5390 DATA 1,255,192,1,255,192,1,255,192, 

0,255,192,0,127,128,0,62,0 

5400 DATA 0,32,0,0,32,0,0,32,0,0,112,0,0 

,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

5410 REM EXPLOSION 

5420 DATA 0,0,0,76,1,0,0,128,4,32,4,32,0 

,48,0,8,0,0,0,32,48,80,0,130 

5430 DATA 3,12,0,0,0,4,32,0,128,0,36,0,0 

,0,192,201,0,4,0,0,0,19,32,192 

5440 DATA 0,4,0,32,0,1,4,192,0,0,4,8,0,0 

,0,0 

6999 REM GAME OVER-PLAY AGAIN OPTION 

7000 PRINT" [CLEAR]" 

7010 POKE V+21,124 

7020 PRINT" [ 8" [ DOWN ] " ] "TAB( 6) "YUMMY [ 3" . " 
].,, 

7030 PRINT TAB(14)"YUMMY[3"."]" 

7040 PRINT TAB(22)"YUMMY[3"."]" 

7050 PRINT: PRINT TAB(4)"WE GOT SPACESHIP 

S IN OUR TUMMY[4"!"]" 

7060 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I,0:NEXT 

7070 POKE S+24,15:P0KE S+1,15:P0KE S+5,1 

6 

7080 POKE S+6, 240: POKE S+4,21 

7090 FOR T=l TO 2 

7100 R=10 

7110 POKE S+15,R 

7120 R=R+1 

7130 IF R=200 THEN 7150 

7140 GOTO 7110 

7150 NEXT T 

7160 FOR 1=0 TO 24: POKE S+I,0:NEXT 

7170 PRINT" [CLEAR]" 

7190 PRINT "[10"[D0WN]"]"TAB(9)"S COR 

E[5" "]"SC 

7200 PRINT: PRINT 

7210 PRINT TAB(6)"PLAY AGAIN?[6" "]Y OR 

N" 

7215 GET JUNK$:IF JUNK$<>"" THEN 7215 

7220 GET A$:IF A$="" THEN 7220 

7230 IF A$="Y" THEN 7250 

7240 END 

7250 POKE V+21,0:P0KE 50432,0 

7260 PRINT" [CLEAR]" 

7265 W=PEEK(V+30) 

7270 RUN 



EP 
JC 

PJ 

FF 

AL 
FG 

JG 

DO 

NC 
DB 
HH 
LP 

PJ 
FO 
DL 

EL 
DI 

KG 
DK 
JO 
GK 
HB 
DB 
KI 
FE 
NG 
DI 
HH 

MN 
GJ 

DN 
EC 
NN 
NH 
IC 
HO 
HH 
HN 
II 



SCRATCH PAD 

FROM PAGE 91 



MAIN PROGRAM 



10 F0RAD=49152T049418:READD:POKEAD,D:NEX 

AHOY! 123 



To enter STREAMER FONT... 



you must use our Flankspeed machine language entry program, 
the introduction to Flankspeed on page 116 of this magazine. 



Read 



TAD 

•20 DATA 160, 0,1 77, 25 1,145, 253 
■ 30 DATA 1 69 , 14 , 145 , 30 , 200 , 240 
•40 DATA 13, 192,232,208,241, 166 
•50 DATA254.236, 127, 192,208,234 
•60 DATA76.49, 234,230, 252, 230 
•70 DATA254,230,31,76,2,192 
•80 DATA 120, 169, 49, 141, 20, 3 
•90 DATA169, 192,141 ,21,3,88 

■ 100 DATA96 , 32 , 159 , 255, 166, 198 
•110 DATA208,3,76,49,234,202 

• 120 DATA189 , 119, 2 , 201 , 133 , 208 
■130 DATA28, 169, 0,133, 251, 133 

• 140 DATA30 , 133 , 253 , 169 , 194 , 133 

• 150 DATA252 , 169 , 216 , 133 ,31 , 169 
•160 DATA4, 133,254, 169,7, 141 
•170 DATA127, 192, 76, 0,192, 201 
•180 DATA137, 208,29, 169,0, 133 
•190 DATA251,133,253,133,30,169 
•200 DATA4, 133, 252, 169, 194, 133 
•210 DATA254,169,197,141,127,192 
•220 DATA169, 216, 133,31,76,0 

■ 230 DATA192, 7 , 201 , 134, 208, 30 
•240 DATA 169, 0,1 33, 30, 133, 253 
•250 DATA 169, 4, 133, 254, 169, 232 
•260 DATA133,251,169,197,133,252 
•270 DATA169,7,141,127,192,169 
•280 DATA216, 133,31,76,0,192 

■ 290 DATA 201 , 138 , 208 , 30 , 169 , 
•300 DATA133,251, 133,30, 169,4 
•310 DATA133, 252, 169,232, 133,253 
•320 DATA169, 197, 133,254, 169,216 

■ 330 DATA133 , 31 , 169 , 200, 141 , 127 
•340 DATA192, 76, 0,192, 201, 135 

■ 350 DATA208, 30, 169, 208, 133, 251 
•360 DATA169, 201, 133, 252, 169,0 
•370 DATA133,253,133,30,169,216 
•380 DATA133,31,169,4,133,254 
•390 DATA169,7,141,127,192,76 

• 400 DAT AO , 1 9 2 , 20 1 , 1 39 , 208 , 30 
•410 DATA169, 0,133, 251, 133, 30 
•420 DATA169, 4, 133,252,169,216 
•430 DATA133,31,169,208,133,253 
•440 DATA169, 201, 133,254,169,204 
•450 DATA141, 127, 192, 76, 0,192 
•460 DATA76.49.234 



•10 PRINT" [ CLEAR ][ 4" [ DOWN J*T 
•20 INPUT'LOAD OR SAVE (L/S)";A$ 
•30 IFA$="L"GOT0100 
•40 IFA$="S"GGT0200 
•50 GOTO 10 



MA 
BP 
KH 
NF 
EL 
MF 
FD 
PP 
CM 
GL 
GC 
KI 
EB 
AN 
BP 
HB 
MP 
DO 
BF 
NK 
JG 
IN 
PI 
IC 
MG 
DI 
LA 
AL 
LD 
HI 
MK 
IK 
AJ 
KE 
MA 
I KA 
MK 
LK 
IL 
KO 
DO 
LG 
AK 
KB 
GG 
FG 

LOAD/SAVE 



LH 
IC 
FF 
GH 
PH 



• 1 10 INPUT" FILENAME" ; C$ : IFB$^"D"THENB=8 : C 
$="0:"+C$:GOTO140 DG 

•120 Bsl CO 

•140 G0SUB30O:POKE780,0:SYS65493:SYS49188 PL 
•150 PRINT" [ DOWN ] RUN /STOP-RESTORE DE-ACTI 

VATES" MH 

•160 PRINT"TO ACTIVATE: SYS49188":END OC 
•200 PRINT" [3" [RIGHT] "]SAVE F-l SCREEN [9" 

"][3 ,, ="]> 1 KN 

•210 PRINT" [3"[RIGHT]"]SAVE F-l AND F-2 S 

CREEN [3"="]> 2 DF 

•220 PRINT" [ 3" [ RIGHT] "]SAVE ALL THREE SCR 

EENS [3"="]> 3 IB 

•230 INPUT"CH0OSE BY NUMBER" ;A%: IF A%<10RA 

%>3THEN230 NJ 

•250 A=49664+1000*A% JM 

•260 INPUT"TAPE OR DISC (T/D)";B$:IFB$<y' 

T"ANDB$O"D"THEN260 LN 

•265 IFB$="T"THENB=1:G0T0280 FH 

•270 B=8 DH 

•280 INPUT"FILENAME" ;C$ : IFB=8THENC$="0: "+ 

C$:OPEN15,8,15,"S"+C$:CLOSE15 AH 

•295 G0SUB300 ' CD , 

•297 POKE780,251:POKE251,0:POKE252,192 EA 

• 298 P0KE782 , A/256 : POKE781 , A-PEEK ( 782 )*25 
6:SYS65496:END LL 

•300 C=256*PEEK(54)+PEEK(53)~LEN(C$) EK 
•310 P0KE780,LEN(C$) :POKE782,C/256:P0KE78 
1,C-256*PEEK(782):SYS65469 EO 

• 320 P0KE780 , 1 : P0KE781 , B: POKE782 , 1 : SYS654 
66: RETURN 

STREAMER FONT 

FROM PAGE 28 

Beginning address in hex: 0801 
Ending address in hex; 1840 






•100 INPUT"TAPE OR DISC (T/D)";B$:IFB$<>" 
T"ANDB$<>"D"THEN100 LD 



SYS to start: 2061 










MAIN PROGRAM 


0801: 


OB 


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92 


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8D 


AE 


0A49: 


FO 


19 


C9 


8A 


FO 


18 


C9 


87 


02 ' 


)C19 


: 10 


DO 


4C 


04 


OC 


AD 


10 


DO 


E4 


0A51: 


FO 


17 


C9 


8B 


FO 


16 


C9 


88 


08 ' 


JC21 


i 29 


01 


FO 


15 


AD 


10 


DO 


49 


29 


OA59: 


FO 


15 


4C 


63 


13 


4C 


71 


13 


F2 ' 


JC29 


: 01 


8D 


10 


DO 


A9 


B8 


8D 


00 


88 




































AHOYl 


125 



0C31-: 


DO 


A9 


01 


8D 


82 


18 


20 


IE 


13 


0C39: 


13 


4C 


2E 


09 


A9 


01 


8D 


82 


8A 


0C41: 


18 


20 


IE 


13 


4C 


04 


OC 


A9 


BO 


0G49: 


08 


8D 


9B 


16 


20 


25 


12 


CE 


B6 


0C51: 


00 


DO 


AD 


00 


DO 


C9 


FF 


FO 


5B 


0C59: 


13 


C9 


B4 


FO 


31 


CE 


9B 


16 


8D 


0C61: 


DO 


EA 


AD 


00 


DO 


C9 


10 


FO 


66 


0C69: 


OE 


4C 


2E 


09 


AD 


10 


DO 


49 


D2 


0C71: 


01 


8D 


10 


DO 


4C 


5E 


OC 


AD 


45 


OC79: 


10 


DO 


29 


01 


DO 


OD 


A9 


BO 


BC 


0C81: 


8D 


00 


DO 


A9 


01 


8D 


82 


18 


B2 


0C89: 


20 


EC 


12 


4C 


2E 


09 


A9 


01 


D6 


0C91: 


8D 


82 


18 


20 


EC 


12 


4C 


5E 


83 


0C99: 


OC 


20 


3B 


OD 


AD 


7A 


18 


DO 


IF 


OCAl: 


oc 


A9 


01 


8D 


7A 


18 


Al 


FC 


17 


OCA9: 


49 


04 


8D 


9A 


16 


AD 


9A 


16 


93 


0CB1: 


81 


FC 


AD 


7B 


18 


DO 


06 


20 


68 


0CB9: 


7 


15 


4C 


41 


09 


AD 


00 


DO 


EA 


OCC1: 


FO 


4E 


AD 


10 


DO 


29 


01 


DO 


8A 


OCC9 : 


AC 


AD 


00 


DO 


C9 


64 


90 


12 


65 


OCD1: 


C9 


B4 


90 


1C 


AD 


7C 


18 


69 


A8 


0CD9: 


1C 


38 


E5 


FC 


OA 


A8 


C8 


4C 


D8 


OCE1 : 


33 


OD 


AD 


7C 


18 


69 


09 


38 


OF 


OCE9: 


E5 


FC 


OA 


A8 


C8 


4C 


33 


OD 


D4 


OCF1: 


38 


A5 


FC 


E9 


09 


38 


ED 


7C 


62 


OCF9: 


18 


OA 


8D 


78 


18 


38 


A5 


FC 


15 


ODOl: 


ED 


78 


18 


85 


FC 


A5 


FD 


E9 


8F 


OD09 : 


00 


85 


FD 


AO 


01 


4C 


33 


OD 


BA 


OD11: 


AO 


01 


4C 


33 


OD 


38 


A5 


FC 


1A 


OD19: 


E9 


ID 


38 


ED 


7C 


18 


OA 


8D 


72 


0D2.1: 


78 


18 


38 


A5 


FC 


ED 


78 


18 


OB 


0D29: 


85 


FC 


A5 


FD 


E9 


00 


85 


FD 


BC 


0D31: 


AO 


01 


AD 


9A 


16 


91 


FC 


4C 


OC 


OD39: 


B8 


OC 


38 


AD 


01 


DO 


E9 


31 


DO 


OD41: 


4A 


4A 


4A 


8D 


71 


18 


OA 


OA 


4B 


0D49; 


6D 


71 


18 


A2 


00 


8E 


71 


18 


FA 


0D51: 


OA 


OA 


2E 


71 


18 


OA 


2E 


71 


C6 


OD59: 


18 


85 


FC 


8D 


7C 


18 


AD 


71 


35 


OD61; 


18 


69 


D8 


85 


FD 


AD 


10 


DO 


CD 


0D69: 


8D 


73 


18 


38 


AD 


00 


DO 


E9 


23 


0D71-: 


17 


8D 


72 


18 


AD 


73 


18 


E9 


C3 


OD79: 


00 


4A 


6E 


72 


18 


AD 


72 


18 


F4 


0D81: 


4A 


4A 


8D 


7E 


18 


65 


FC 


85 


22 


0D89: 


FC 


A5 


FD 


69 


00 


85 


FD 


60 


77 


OD91: 


A9 


00 


85 


FE 


A2 


28 


AD 


E4 


ID 


OD99: 


17 


85 


FF 


AO 


00 


A9 


00 


91 


12 


ODA1: 


FE 


C8 


CO 


40 


DO 


F7 


18 


A 5 


FO 


0DA9: 


FE 


69 


40 


85 


FE 


A5 


FF 


69 


E5 


ODB1: 


00 


85 


FF 


CA 


DO 


E5 


60 


20 


39 


ODB9: 


C3 


FF 


20 


CC 


FF 


20 


41 


12 


D'D 


ODC1; 


A9 


17 


85 


FD 


A9 


3C 


85 


FC 


6E 


ODC9: 


20 


4A 


12 


20 


E4 


FF 


FO 


FB 


38 


ODD1: 


20 


57 


12 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


3B 


ODD9: 


8D 


15 


DO 


4C 


2E 


09 


20 


2F 


20 


ODE I: 


12 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


76 


0DE9: 


DO 


20 


41 


12 


A9 


17 


85 


FD 


72 


ODF1: 


A9 


2A 


85 


FC 


20 


4A 


12 


20 


E4 


0DF9: 


DC 


OE 


AD 


3E 


18 


FO 


4F 


AD 


D6 


126 AHOY! 



















0E01: 


0E09 : 


0E11: 


0E19: 


0E21: 


0E29 : 


0E31: 


OE39: 


0E41: 


0E49: 


0E51: 


0E59: 


0E61: 


0E69: 


0E71: 


0E79: 


0E81: 


0E89: 


0E91: 


OE99: 


0EA1: 


0EA9: 


0EB1: 


0EB9: 


0EC1: 


0EC9: 


0ED1: 


0ED9: 


0EE1: 


0EE9: 


0EF1: 


0EF9: 


0F01: 


0F09: 


0F11; 


0F19: 


0F21: 


0F29: 


0F31i 


0F39: 


0F41: 


0F49: 


0F51: 


0F59: 


0F61: 


0F69: 


0F71: 


0F79: 


0F81: 


0F89: 


0F91: 


0F99: 


0FA1: 


0FA9: 


0FB1: 


0FB9: 


0FC1: 


0FC9: 



E5 


17 


8D 


PA 


07 


A9 


01 


8D 


C5 


3D 


18 


20 


C4 


OE 


A2 


01 


20 


15 


C9 


FF 


A2 


28 


A9 


00 


85 


FE 


D3 


AD 


E4 


17 


85 


FF 


AO 


00 


Bl 


9A 


FE 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


CO 


40 


DO 


AD 


F6 


18 


A5 


FE 


69 


40 


85 


FE 


OB 


A5 


FF 


69 


00 


85 


FF 


EE 


FA 


AF 


07 


CA 


DO 


El 


A9 


01 


20 


C3 


4C 


FF 


20 


CC 


FF 


A5 


90 


C9 


40 


6E 


FO 


04 


C9 


00 


DO 


OE 


20 


57 


5E 


12 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


E5 


DO 


4C 


OD 


OB 


4C 


B8 


OD 


20 


CO 


2F 


12 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


10 


15 


DO 


20 


41 


12 


A9 


17 


85 


09 


FD 


A9 


33 


85 


FC 


20 


4A 


12 


4B 


20 


DC 


OE 


AD 


3E 


18 


FO 


CE 


48 


38 


AD 


E5 


17 


E9 


01 


8D 


FA 


D7 


07 


A9 


00 


8D 


3D 


18 


20 


C4 


02 


OE 


A2 


01 


20 


C6 


FF 


A2 


28 


F4 


A9 


00 


85 


FE 


AD 


E4 


17 


85 


F6 


FF 


AO 


00 


20 


E4 


FF 


91 


FE 


D7 


C8 


CO 


40 


DO 


F6 


18 


A5 


FE 


F7 


69 


40 


85 


FE 


A5 


FF 


69 


00 


EE 


85 


FF 


EE 


FA 


07 


CA 


DO 


El 


AD 


4C 


3D 


OE 


AD 


3E 


18 


AO 


18 


16 


A2 


3F 


20 


BD 


F F 


A9 


01 


A2 


D6 


08 


AC 


3D 


18 


20 


BA 


FF 


20 


D6 


CO 


FF 


60 


A9 


00 


8D 


3E 


18 


88 


20 


E4 


FF 


FO 


FB 


C9 


OD 


FO 


9B 


1C 


C9 


14 


FO 


19 


C9 


20 


90 


68 


EF 


C9 


5B 


BO 


EB 


AC 


3E 


18 


A6 


99 


3F 


18 


20 


D2 


FF 


EE 


3E 


OB 


18 


CO 


OF 


DO 


DB 


60 


AD 


3E 


El 


18 


C9 


00 


FO 


D3 


A9 


9D 


20 


17 


D2 


FF 


A9 


20 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


4A 


9D 


20 


D2 


FF 


CE 


3E 


18 


4C 


IB 


El 


OE 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


7E 


15 


DO 


AD 


76 


18 


8D 


73 


18 


64 


20 


2F 


12 


20 


41 


12 


A9 


17 


C6 


85 


FD 


A9 


84 


85 


FC 


20 


4A 


D7 


12 


20 


4C 


10 


AD 


4F 


18 


FO 


D5 


34 


A9 


04 


A2 


04 


AO 


00 


20 


92 


BA 


FF 


20 


CO 


FF 


A2 


04 


20 


B3 


C9 


FF 


A5 


90 


C9 


80 


FO 


20 


B4 


AO 


00 


8C 


79 


18 


AC 


79 


18 


5E 


B9 


50 


18 


C9 


28 


FO 


14 


20 


A2 


9C 


OF 


EE 


79 


18 


AD 


79 


18 


DC 


CD 


4F 


18 


DO 


E8 


4C 


30 


10 


F4 


4C 


E7 


10 


AD 


AC 


16 


8D 


77 


3B 


18 


A2 


OE 


A9 


OD 


20 


D2 


FF 


FB 


CA 


DO 


F8 


CE 


77 


18 


DO 


Fl 


47 


4C 


73 


OF 


8D 


76 


18 


20 


D8 


7D 


14 


AO 


00 


AD 


AC 


16 


C9 


03 


93 


FO 


OC 


C9 


02 


FO 


OE 


4C 


C3 


81 


OF 


CO 


3C 


DO 


EE 


60 


20 


C9 


C7 


OF 


88 


88 


88 


20 


C9 


OF 


88 


E3 


88 


88 


20 


C9 


OF 


4C 


B2 


OF 


D9 


A9 


10 


20 


D2 


FF 


AD 


A8 


16 


E2 



0FD1 


: 20 


D2 


FF 


AD 


A9 


16 


20 


D2 


25 


11A1: 


85 


FD 


20 


4A 


12 


20 


06 


12 


D9 


OFD9 


: FF 


20 


F3 


OF 


20 


F3 


OF 


20 


40 


11A9: 


C9 


OD 


FO 


4B 


8D 


A5 


16 


A9 


AF 


OFE1 


: F3 


OF 


A 9 


08 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


33 


11B1: 


C3 


85 


FC 


A9 


16 


85 


FD 


20 


5B 


OFE9 


: OD 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


OF 


20 


D2 


95 


11B9 


4A 


12 


A9 


12 


8D 


AD 


16 


20 


43 


OFF1 


FF 


60 


A2 


08 


AD 


AB 


16 


8D 


F9 


11C1: 


E4 


FF 


C9 


59 


FO 


09 


C9 


4E 


DB 


OFF9 


; 72 


18 


Bl 


FE 


3D 


9C 


16 


FO 


16 


11C9; 


DO 


F5 


A9 


92 


8D 


AD 


16 


20 


3E 


1001 


IB 


AD 


AD 


16 


20 


D2 


FF 


AD 


2E 


llDl: 


2F 


12 


20 


41 


12 


A9 


D4 


85 


8A 


1009 


: A5 


16 


20 


D2 


FF 


CE 


72 


18 


11 


11D9: 


FC 


A9 


16 


85 


FD 


20 


4A 


12 


96 


1011 


. BO 


F5 


CA 


DO 


DF 


20 


El 


FF 


55 


11E1 


20 


06 


12 


C9 


OD 


FO 


10 


8D 


7F 


1019 


: FO 


15 


C8 


60 


A9 


92 


20 


D2 


77 


11E9 


A7 


16 


A9 


96 


8D 


9B 


16 


20 


47 


1021 


FF 


AD 


A7 


16 


20 


D2 


FF 


CE 


4E 


11F1 


25 


12 


CE 


9B 


16 


DO 


F8 


AD 


21 


1029 


72 


18 


DO 


F5 


4C 


13 


10 


A9 


93 


11F9 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


DO 


20 


BF 


1031: 


04 


20 


C3 


FF 


20 


CC 


FF 


20 


26 


1201 i 


57 


12 


4C 


2E 


09 


20 


E4 


FF 


F2 


1039 


57 


12 


AD 


73 


18 


8D 


76 


18 


F7 


1209 


FO 


FB 


C9 


OD 


FO 


OF 


C9 


20 


B6 


1041: 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


DO 


94 


1211 


90 


F3 


C9 


AO 


BO 


04 


C9 


81 


FF 


1049' 


4C 


2E 


09 


A9 


00 


8D 


4F 


18 


6B 


1219 


BO 


EB 


20 


D2 


FF 


60 


AO 


DC 


86 


1051: 


8D 


8A 


02 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


OD 


47 


1221 


88 


DO 


FD 


60 


AE 


97 


16 


20 


55 


1059 


FO 


6A 


C9 


14 


FO 


6C 


C9 


20 


D9 


1229 


IF 


12 


CA 


DO 


FA 


60 


AO 


28 


1A 


1061: 


FO 


23 


C9 


21 


FO 


24 


C9 


24 


63 


1231- 


A9 


OB 


99 


BF 


DB 


A9 


20 


99 


7E 


1069 


FO 


25 


C9 


2A 


FO 


26 


C9 


3F 


93 


1239 


BF 


07 


88 


CO 


00 


DO 


Fl 


60 


6C 


1071: 


FO 


27 


C9 


41 


90 


04 


C9 


5B 


4E 


1241: 


A2 


18 


AO 


00 


18 


20 


FO 


FF 


C5 


1079: 


90 


24 


C9 


30 


90 


D5 


C9 


3A 


92 


1249 


60 


AO 


00 


Bl 


FC 


20 


D2 


FF 


EB 


1081: 


90 


25 


4C 


54 


10 


A2 


28 


4C 


FE 


1251 


C8 


C9 


00 


DO 


F6 


60 


20 


2F 


5B 


1089 


Bl 


10 


A2 


U 


4C 


Bl 


10 


A 2 


B8 


1259 


12 


A9 


8D 


85 


FC 


A9 


17 


85 


6B 


1091: 


1C 


4C 


Bl 


10 


A2 


27 


4C 


Bl 


83 


1261- 


FD 


20 


41 


12 


20 


4A 


12 


A9 


F8 


1099- 


10 


A2 


IB 


4C 


Bl 


10 


48 


38 


F5 


1269 


AA 


8D 


E7 


07 


A9 


OC 


8D 


E7 


BB 


10A1 


E9 


41 


AA 


68 


4C 


Bl 


10 


48 


36 


1271: 


DB 


60 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


IB 


10A9 


38 


E9 


13 


AA 


68 


4C 


Bl 


10 


FF 


1279 


15 


DO 


20 


2F 


12 


20 


41 


12 


34 


10B1 


AC 


4F 


18 


20 


D2 


FF 


8A 


99 


DC 


1281 


A9 


E8 


8 5 


FC 


A9 


16 


85 


FD 


D9 


10B9 


50 


18 


EE 


4F 


18 


AD 


4F 


18 


8D 


1289 


20 


4A 


12 


20 


E4 


FF 


FO 


FB 


F7 


10C1 


C9 


21 


DO 


8F 


A9 


80 


8D 


8A 


4F 


1291 


C9 


59 


DO 


11 


20 


91 


OD 


20 


75 


10C9 


2 


60 


AD 


4F 


18 


C9 


00 


FO 


FB 


1299 


57 


12 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


70 


10D1 


82 


A9 


9D 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


20 


58 


12A1 


15 


DO 


4C 


OD 


OB 


20 


57 


12 


75 


10D9 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


9D 


20 


D2 


FF 


07 


12A9 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


DO 


FC 


10E1 


CE 


4F 


18 


4C 


54 


10 


A9 


04 


76 


12B1 


4C 


2E 


09 


A9 


18 


8D 


00 


DO 


55 


10E9 


20 


C3 


FF 


20 


CC 


FF 


20 


2F 


OA 


12B9 


AD 


10 


DO 


29 


02 


8D 


10 


DO 


El 


10F1 


12 


20 


41 


12 


A9 


5C 


85 


FC 


FF 


12C1 


AD 


7F 


18 


FO 


05 


A9 


B8 


8D 


EC 


10F9 


A9 


17 


85 


FD 


20 


4A 


12 


20 


DA 


12C9 


00 


DO 


A9 


32 


8D 


01 


DO 


4C 


22 


1101 


E4 


FF 


FO 


FB 


AD 


73 


18 


8D 


99 


12D1 


2E 


09 


20 


27 


16 


A2 


18 


AO 


CI 


1109 


76 


18 


A9 


03 


8D 


15 


DO 


20 


D7 


12D9 


13 


A9 


05 


91 


FC 


88 


CO 


FF 


73 


1111 


57 


12 


4C 


2E 


09 


20 


27 


16 


5B 


12E1 


DO 


F7 


20 


3E 


16 


CA 


DO 


EF 


AA 


1119 


A2 


18 


AO 


00 


8C 


78 


18 


38 


C9 


12E9 


4C 


2E 


09 


20 


C8 


14 


AD 


82 


9A 


1121 


A9 


13 


ED 


78 


18 


8D 


71 


18 


73 


12F1 


18 


DO 


OD 


A9 


18 


8D 


00 


DO 


08 


1129 


Bl 


FC 


8D 


77 


18 


AC 


71 


18 


2B 


12F9 


: AD 


10 


DO 


29 


02 


8D 


10 


DO 


22 


1131 


Bl 


FC 


AC 


78 


18 


91 


FC 


AC 


58 


1301 


A9 


00 


8D 


82 


18 


20 


7C 


14 


83 


1139 


71 


18 


AD 


77 


18 


91 


FC 


AC 


3B 


1309 


: CE 


FA 


07 


AD 


7F 


18 


DO 


04 


F3 


1141 


78 


18 


C8 


CO 


OA 


DO 


D5 


20 


2C 


1311 


i 20 


BC 


15 


60 


20 


5A 


16 


A9 


9D 


1149 


; 3E 


16 


CA 


DO 


CD 


4C 


2E 


09 


8A 


1319 


: 00 


8D 


7F 


18 


60 


20 


B8 


14 


8B 


1151 


20 


27 


16 


18 


AD 


7F 


18 


69 


7 5 


1321 


; AD 


82 


18 


DO 


OD 


A9 


B8 


8D 


37 


1159 


98 


85 


FE 


A9 


DB 


85 


FF 


A2 


24 


1329 


; 00 


DO 


AD 


10 


DO 


29 


02 


8D 


41 


1161 


OC 


AO 


00 


Bl 


FE 


8D 


77 


18 


DB 


1331 


: 10 


DO 


A9 


00 


8D 


82 


18 


20 


04 


1169 


, Bl 


FC 


91 


FE 


AD 


77 


18 


91 


77 


1339 


: 40 


14 


EE 


FA 


07 


AD 


7F 


18 


C3 


1171 


FC 


C8 


CO 


14 


DO 


ED 


20 


3E 


29 


1341 


: FO 


04 


20 


9D 


15 


60 


20 


5A 


E3 


1179 


, 16 


38 


A5 


FE 


E9 


28 


85 


FE 


03 


1349 


: 16 


A9 


14 


8D 


7F 


18 


60 


A9 


4C 


1181 


A5 


FF 


E9 


00 


85 


FF 


CA 


DO 


32 


1351 


: 83 


85 


FE 


A9 


18 


85 


FF 


A9 


4A 


1189 


D8 


4C 


2E 


09 


20 


2F 


12 


20 


67 


1359 


: 05 


8D 


81 


18 


20 


59 


15 


4C 


60 


1191 


41 


12 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


52 


1361 


: 2E 


09 


A9 


83 


85 


FE 


A9 


18 


OC 


1199 


15 


DO 


A9 


AE 


85 


FC 


A9 


16 


U 


1369 


: 85 


FF 


20 


OA 


15 


4C 


2E 


09 


Bl 




































AHOY! 


127 



1371: 


20 


27 


16 


A2 


18 


AO 


13 


Bl 


EE 


1541: 


8D 


72 


18 


20 


4C 


16 


CA 


DO 


77 


1379: 


FC 


8D 


77 


18 


88 


Bl 


FC 


C8 


93 


1549: 


E9 


AD 


72 


18 


AC 


77 


18 


91 


39 


1381: 


91 


FC 


88 


88 


CO 


FF 


DO 


F5 


A8 


1551: 


FE 


EE 


77 


18 


60 


20 


D8 


14 


3C 


1389: 


C8 


AD 


77 


18 


91 


FC 


20 


3E 


7C 


1559: 


AO 


00 


8C 


78 


18 


8C 


77 


18 


33 


1391: 


16 


CA 


DO 


El 


4C 


2E 


09 


20 


C8 


1561: 


20 


31 


16 


20 


78 


15 


20 


78 


OF 


1399: 


27 


16 


A 2 


18 


AO 


00 


Bl 


FC 


EO 


1569: 


15 


20 


78 


15 


EE 


78 


18 


AD 


59 


13A1: 


8D 


77 


18 


C8 


Bl 


FC 


88 


91 


50 


1571: 


78 


18 


C9 


14 


DO 


EA 


60 


A2 


9E 


13A9: 


FC 


C8 


C8 


CO 


14 


DO 


F5 


88 


5C 


1579: 


08 


AD 


81 


18 


AC 


78 


18 


91 


97 


13B1: 


AD 


77 


18 


91 


FC 


20 


3E 


16 


Fl 


1581: 


FC 


AC 


77 


18 


Bl 


FE 


3D 


9C 


45 


13B9: 


CA 


DO 


El 


4C 


2E 


09 


AO 


13 


6E 


1589: 


16 


FO 


07 


AC 


78 


18 


A 9 


01 


7F 


13C1: 


A2 


17 


18 


20 


31 


16 


Bl 


FC 


A9 


1591: 


91 


FC 


20 


4C 


16 


CA 


DO 


El 


20 


13C9: 


8D 


77 


18 


20 


4C 


16 


Bl 


FC 


18 


1599: 


EE 


7 7 


18 


60 


A9 


00 


8D 


7F 


2F 


13D1: 


8D 


72 


18 


20 


3E 


16 


AD 


72 


7E 


15A1: 


18 


8D 


81 


18 


20 


C8 


14 


20 


FD 


13D9: 


18 


91 


FC 


20 


32 


14 


CA 


DO 


82 


15A9: 


56 


15 


A9 


14 


8D 


7F 


18 


A9 


Al 


13E1: 


ED 


20 


3E 


16 


AD 


77 


18 


91 


13 


15B1: 


05 


8D 


81 


18 


20 


B8 


14 


20 


EA 


13E9: 


FC 


88 


CO 


FF 


DO 


D2 


4C 


2E 


4E 


15B9: 


56 


15 


60 


A9 


14 


8D 


7F 


18 


68 


13F1: 


09 


AO 


13 


A2 


17 


20 


27 


16 


C5 


15C1: 


A9 


00 


8D 


81 


18 


20 


B8 


14 


7F 


13F9: 


Bl 


FC 


8D 


77 


18 


20 


3E 


16 


3A 


15C9: 


20 


56 


15 


A9 


05 


8D 


81 


18 


2B 


1401: 


Bl 


FC 


8D 


72 


18 


20 


4C 


16 


4A 


15D1: 


A9 


00 


8D 


7F 


18 


20 


C8 


14 


9D 


1409: 


AD 


72 


18 


91 


FC 


20 


24 


14 


28 


15D9: 


20 


56 


15 


60 


20 


2F 


12 


AD 


D4 


1411: 


CA 


DO 


ED 


20 


4C 


16 


AD 


77 


42 


15E1: 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


DO 


20 


A7 


1419: 


18 


91 


FC 


88 


CO 


FF 


DO 


D3 


AD 


15E9: 


41 


12 


AO 


00 


B9 


11 


17 


C9 


89 


1421: 


4C 


2E 


09 


18 


A5 


FC 


69 


50 


19 


15F1: 


00 


FO 


07 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


4C 


Fl 


1429: 


85 


FC 


A 5 


FD 


69 


00 


85 


FD 


3C 


15F9: 


ED 


15 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


00 


FO 


BC 


1431: 


60 


38 


A5 


FC 


E9 


50 


85 


FC 


29 


1601: 


F9 


C9 


30 


90 


F5 


C9 


3A 


BO 


30 


1439: 


A5 


FD 


E9 


00 


85 


FD 


60 


A9 


54 


1609: 


Fl 


38 


E9 


2F 


8D 


97 


16 


38 


BF 


1441: 


08 


8D 


77 


18 


EE 


02 


DO 


AD 


D5 


1611: 


A9 


OB 


ED 


97 


16 


8D 


97 


16 


9C 


1449: 


02 


DO 


FO 


OF 


CE 


77 


18 


DO 


4B 


1619: 


AD 


15 


DO 


49 


03 


8D 


15 


DO 


6C 


1451: 


F3 


AD 


02 


DO 


C9 


55 


FO 


OE 


E3 


1621: 


20 


57 


12 


4C 


2E 


09 


AD 


7F 


5B 


1459: 


4C 


7B 


14 


AD 


10 


DO 


49 


02 


OF 


1629: 


18 


85 


FC 


A9 


D8 


85 


FD 


60 


2A 


1461: 


8D 


10 


DO 


4C 


4D 


14 


AD 


10 


3B 


1631: 


18 


AD 


7F 


18 


69 


98 


85 


FC 


13 


1469: 


DO 


29 


02 


FO 


OD 


AD 


10 


DO 


Fl 


1639: 


A9 


DB 


85 


FD 


60 


18 


A5 


FC 


5D 


1471 : 


49 


02 


8D 


10 


DO 


A9 


15 


8D 


77 


1641: 


69 


28 


85 


FC 


A 5 


FD 


69 


00 


62 


1479: 


02 


DO 


60 


A9 


08 


8D 


77 


18 


7B 


1649: 


85 


FD 


60 


38 


A5 


FC 


E9 


28 


1A 


1481: 


CE 


02 


DO 


AD 


02 


DO 


FO 


OF 


A3 


1651: 


85 


FC 


A5 


FD 


E9 


00 


85 


FD 


E4 


1489: 


CE 


77 


18 


DO 


F3 


AD 


02 


DO 


2D 


1659: 


60 


A9 


D7 


85 


FD 


A9 


FF 


85 


ED 


1491: 


C9 


OD 


FO 


OE 


4C 


B7 


14 


AD 


2D 


1661: 


FC 


A2 


18 


AO 


28 


Bl 


FC 


29 


B9 


1499: 


10 


DO 


49 


02 


8D 


10 


DO 


4C 


80 


1669: 


OF 


C9 


01 


FO 


04 


49 


05 


91 


18 


14A1: 


89 


14 


AD 


10 


DO 


29 


02 


DO 


C9 


1671: 


FC 


88 


DO 


Fl 


20 


3E 


16 


CA 


F8 


14A9: 


OD 


AD 


10 


DO 


49 


02 


8D 


10 


2E 


1679: 


DO 


E9 


60 


20 


27 


16 


A2 


18 


AC 


14B1: 


DO 


A9. 


4D 


8D 


02 


DO 


60 


EE 


29 


1681: 


AO 


13 


Bl 


FC 


49 


04 


91 


FC 


BF 


14B9: 


76 


18 


AD 


76 


18 


C9 


28 


DO 


47 


1689: 


88 


CO 


FF 


DO 


F5 


20 


3E 


16 


OE 


14C1: 


05 


A9 


00 


8D 


76 


18 


60 


CE 


BB 


1691: 


CA 


DO 


ED 


4C 


2E 


09 


OC 


00 


AA 


14C9: 


76 


18 


AD 


76 


18 


C9 


FF 


DO 


2F 


1699: 


00 


00 


FF 


00 


01 


02 


04 


08 


A8 


14D1: 


05 


A9 


27 


8D 


76 


18 


60 


A9 


CD 


16A1: 


10 


20 


40 


80 


23 


00 


20 


32 


08 


14D9: 


00 


8D 


72 


18 


AD 


76 


18 


OA 


38 


16A9: 


38 


00 


01 


01 


92 


98 


20 


46 


75 


14E1: 


OA 


OA 


2E 


72 


18 


OA 


2E 


72 


59 


16B1: 


4F 


52 


45 


4 7 


52 


4F 


55 


4E 


25 


14E9: 


18 


OA 


2E 


72 


18 


OA 


2E 


72 


6F 


16B9: 


44 


20 


43 


48 


41 


52 


2E 


3E 


A9 


14F1: 


18 


85 


FE 


18 


AD 


E4 


17 


6D 


BD 


16C1: 


9F 


00 


98 


20 


52 


45 


56 


45 


4D 


14F9: 


72 


18 


85 


FF 


AD 


76 


18 


6D 


B3 


16C9: 


52 


53 


45 


3F 


20 


28 


59 


2F 


C4 


1501 : 


E5 


17 


8D 


FA 


07 


60 


20 


D8 


E6 


16D1: 


4E 


29 


00 


20 


42 


41 


43 


4B 


7B 


1509: 


14 


AO 


00 


8C 


78 


18 


8C 


77 


DE 


16D9: 


47 


52 


4F 


55 


4E 


44 


20 


43 


OE 


1511: 


18 


20 


31 


16 


20 


29 


15 


20 


OF 


16E1: 


48 


41 


52 


2E 


3E 


9F 


00 


9E 


68 


1519: 


29 


15 


20 


29 


15 


EE 


78 


18 


35 


16E9: 


20 


20 


20 


20 


12 


20 


43 


4C 


2C 


1521: 


AD 


78 


18 


C9 


14 


DO 


EA 


60 


59 


16F1: 


45 


41 


52 


20 


46 


4F 


4E 


54 


23 


1529: 


A2 


08 


A9 


00 


8D 


72 


18 


AC 


42 


16F9: 


CO 


CO 


41 


52 


45 


20 


59 


4F 


ID 


1531 : 


78 


18 


Bl 


FC 


29 


OF 


C9 


01 


73 


1701: 


55 


20 


53 


55 


52 


45 


3F 


20 


16 


1539: 


DO 


09 


AD 


72 


18 


ID 


9C 


16 


IB 


1709: 


28 


59 


2F 


4E 


29 


20 


92 


00 


E3 


128 AHOY! 







































1711: 


98 


20 


43 


55 


52 


53 


4F 


52 


A 9 


2080 


: 00 


00 


00 


OF 


FF 


FO 


3F 


FF 


BF 


1719: 


20 


56 


45 


4C 


4F 


43 


49 


54 


51 


2088 


: FC 


7F 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


FO 


73 


1721: 


59 


20 


28 


30 


2D 


39 


29 


20 


A2 


2090 


: 00 


OF 


EO 


00 


07 


CO 


00 


03 


4B 


1729: 


00 


98 


20 


53 


41 


56 


45 


3E 


50 


2098 


: CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


EO 


1731: 


9F 


00 


98 


20 


4C 


4F 


41 


44 


AA 


20A0 


: 03 


CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


03 


EO 


OC 


1739: 


3E 


9F 


00 


9E 


20 


20 


20 


20 


36 


20A8 


: 00 


07 


Fl 


00 


8F 


7F 


00 


FE 


AF 


1741: 


12 


20 


3C 


3C 


3C 


3C 


3C 


20 


CO 


20B0 


. 7F 


00 


FE 


3F 


00 


FC 


OF 


00 


7A 


1749: 


44 


49 


53 


4B 


20 


45 


52 


52 


7F 


20B8 


: F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


Bl 


1751: 


4F 


52 


20 


3E 


3E 


3E 


3E 


3E 


4A 


20C0 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


42 


1759: 


20 


92 


00 


9E 


20 


20 


20 


20 


2B 


20C8 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


C8 


1761: 


12 


20 


3C 


3C 


3C 


3C 


3C 


20 


EO 


20D0 


FF 


FF 


EO 


00 


03 


EO 


00 


03 


98 


1769: 


44 


45 


56 


49 


43 


45 


20 


4E 


89 


20D8 


EO 


00 


03 


EO 


00 


03 


EO 


00 


81 


1771: 


4F 


54 


20 


50 


52 


45 


53 


45 


B5 


20E0 


03 


EO 


00 


03 


EO 


00 


03 


FO 


9C 


1779: 


4E 


54 


20 


3E 


3E 


3E 


3E 


3E 


73 


20E8 


00 


07 


F8 


00 


OF 


7F 


FF 


FE 


76 


1781: 


20 


92 


00 


98 


50 


52 


49 


4E 


07 


20F0 


7F 


FF 


FE 


3F 


FF 


FC 


OF 


FF 


BA 


1789: 


54 


3E 


9F 


00 


98 


12 


41 


42 


E9 


20F8 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


E9 


1791: 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


4A 


C7 


2100 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


81 


1799: 


4B 


4C 


4D 


4E 


4F 


50 


51 


52 


10 


2108 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


08 


17A1: 


53 


54 


55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


5A 


58 


2110 


FF 


F F 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


C7 


17A9: 


21 


3F 


24 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


29 


2118 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


A8 


17B1: 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


92 


91 


00 


E9 


2120 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


9B 


17B9: 


98 


12 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


25 


2128 


18 


03 


CO 


3C 


03 


CO 


00 


03 


07 


17C1: 


53 


54 


52 


45 


41 


4D 


45 


52 


27 


2130 


CO 


00 


03 


EO 


00 


07 


70 


00 


4C 


17C9: 


20 


46 


4F 


4E 


54 


20 


20 


42 


A4 


2138 


OE 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


46 


17D1: 


59 


20 


42 


4F 


42 


20 


53 


50 


E2 


2140 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


CI 


17D9: 


49 


52 


4B 


4F 


20 


20 


20 


20 


90 


2148 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


48 


17E1: 


20 


92 


00 


20 


80 


7F 


80 


00 


35 


2150 


FF 


FF 


80 


18 


3 


00 


18 


03 


7 


17E9: 


FF 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


AD 


2158 


00 


18 


03 


00 


18 


03 


00 


18 


A6 


17F1: 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


B5 


2160 


03 


00 


18 


03 


00 


18 


03 


00 


99 


17F9: 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


FF 


CO 


00 


FC 


2168: 


18 


03 


00 


3C 


03 


00 


00 


03 


C5 


1801: 


7F 


80 


IF 


EO 


00 


30 


30 


00 


61 


2170: 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


07 


00 


00 


7A 


1809: 


60 


18 


00 


60 


18 


00 


60 


18 


72 


2178: 


OE 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


86 


1811: 


00 


60 


18 


00 


60 


18 


00 


30 


32 


2180- 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


FF 


FO 


3F 


FF 


BF 


1819: 


30 


00 


IF 


EO 


FF 


F8 


00 


FF 


42 


2188 


FC 


7F 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


FO 


73 


1821: 


F8 


00 


FF 


F8 


00 


FF 


F8 


00 


OC 


2190' 


00 


OF 


EO 


00 


07 


CO 


00 


03 


4B 


1829: 


FF 


F8 


00 


FF 


F8 


00 


FF 


F8 


14 


2198 


CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


EO 


1831: 


00 


FF 


F8 


00 


FF 


F8 


00 


FF 


23 


21A0- 


03 


CO 


60 


03 


CO 


60 


03 


EO 


CC 


1839: 


F8 


00 


FF 


F8 


FF 


FF 


FF 


00 


2B 


21A8 


60 


07 


FO 


6*0 


8F 


7F 


EO 


FE 


50 






















21 BO 


7F 


EO 


FE 


3F 


EO 


FC 


OF 


EO 


ID 


Beginning address in hex: 2000 
Ending address in hex: 29FF 










SEQUELA 


21B8 
2 ICO 
21C8 


FO 
00 
FF 


00 
00 

FF 


00 
00 
FF 


00 
80 

FF 


00 
00 
FF 


00 
01 
FF 


00 
FF 
FF 


00 
FF 
FF 


A 9 
42 
C8 






















2000: 


80 


00 


00 


EO 


00 


00 


FC 


00 


5E 


21 DO 


FF 


FF 


80 


18 


01 


00 


18 


00 


82 


2008: 


00 


FF 


80 


00 


FF 


FO 


00 


9F 


19 


21D8 


00 


18 


00 


00 


18 


00 


00 


18 


21 


2010: 


FE 


00 


03 


FF 


CO 


03 


7F 


F9 


4F 


21E0 


00 


00 


18 


00 


00 


18 


00 


80 


91 


2018: 


03 


OF 


FF 


03 


01 


FF 


03 


00 


31 


21E8 


: 18 


01 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


02 


2020: 


7F 


03 


07 


F9 


03 


3F 


CO 


03 


A9 


21F0 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


80 


00 


71 


2028: 


FE 


00 


8F 


FO 


00 


FF 


80 


00 


28 


21F8 


: 01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F9 


2030: 


FC 


00 


00 


EO 


00 


00 


80 


00 


8E 


2200 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


2038 : 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


38 


2 208 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


08 


2040: 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


CI 


2210 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


91 


2048: 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


48 


2218 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


18 


2050: 


FF 


FF 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


3 


08 


2220 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


80 


00 


01 


00 


Al 


2058: 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


E8 


2228 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


28 


2060: 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


CO 


18 


03 


EO 


FB 


2230 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


2068: 


3C 


7 


FO 


7E 


OF 


7F 


FF 


FE 


A8 


2238 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


38 


2070: 


7F 


F7 


FE 


3F 


E3 


FC 


OF 


80 


96 


2240 


: 00 


00 


00 


OE 


00 


00 


3E 


00 


8C 


2078: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


69 


2248 


: 00 


7E 


00 


00 


7E 


00 


00 


F2 


38 




































AHOY! 


129 



22 50 


: 00 


00 


EO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


Fl 


2420: 


03 


DC 


00 


03 


F8 


00 


03 


FO 


EF 


2258 


: CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


9A 


2428: 


00 


7 


70 


00 


OF 


FF 


FF 


FE 


AD 


2260 


: 00 


EO 


00 


00 


FO 


00 


01 


7F 


B2 


2430: 


FF 


FF 


FE 


BF 


FF 


FC 


OF 


FF 


FA 


2268 


: FF 


FF 


7F 


FF 


FF 


3F 


FF 


FF 


27 


2438: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


29 


2270 


: OF 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


01 


00 


00 


80 


2440: 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


CI 


2278 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


78 


2448: 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


48 


2280 


: 00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


02 


24 50: 


FF 


FF 


80 


18 


03 


00 


IS 


03 


07 


2288 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


88 


2458: 


00 


18 


03 


00 


38 


03 


00 


F8 


A7 


2290 


: FF 


FF 


80 


FE 


01 


01 


F7 


00 


OA 


2460: 


03 


03 


F8 


3 


OF 


1)8 


03 


3F 


8C 


2298 


: 03 


E3 


80 


7 


CI 


CO 


OF 


80 


19 


2468: 


1C 


7 


FC 


IE 


OF 


FO 


OF 


FE 


B4 


22 A0 


: EO 


IF 


00 


70 


3E 


00 


38 


7C 


04 


24 70: 


EO 


OF 


FE 


CO 


07 


FC 


80 


03 


A7 


2 2A8 


: 00 


1C 


F8 


00 


OE 


FO 


00 


07 


C3 


2478: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


69 


22 BO 


: EO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


01 


80 


00 


D6 


2480: 


00 


00 


00 


7F 


01 


FO 


3C 


7 


35 


22B8 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B8 


2488: 


FC 


78 


1' 


FE 


70 


OF 


FE 


EO 


6B 


2 2 CO 


: 00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


42 


2490: 


IF 


OF 


EO 


IE 


07 


CO 


1C 


03 


A 4 


22C8 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


C8 


2498: 


CO 


1C 


03 


CO 


1C 


03 


CO 


38 


51 


22 DO 


: FF 


FF 


CO 


00 


01 


CO 


00 


00 


53 


24A0: 


03 


CO 


38 


03 


EO 


38 


03 


EO 


9C 


22D8 


: CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


IB 


24A8: 


78 


07 


FO 


F8 


7 


7F 


FO 


OE 


97 


22 EO 


: 00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


23 


24 BO: 


7F 


FO 


IE 


3F 


EO 


3C 


OF 


80 


2B 


22E8 


: 00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


6A 


24B8: 


FE 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B7 


22 FO 


: CO 


00 


00 


EO 


00 


00 


FO 


00 


83 


24C0: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


CF 


22F8 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F8 


24C8: 


7 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


03 


00 


D5 


2300 


: SO 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


81 


24 DO: 


00 


03 


00 


00 


03 


80 


00 


03 


5 A 


2 308 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


80 


88 


24D8: 


FF 


FF 


FI- 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


D8 


2310 


: 00 


7F 


00 


01 


FC 


00 


07 


FO 


85 


24E0: 


FF 


FF 


FE 


FF 


80 


00 


3 


00 


64 


2318 


: 00 


IF 


CO 


00 


7F 


00 


00 


IF 


96 


24E8: 


00 


3 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


03 


Fl 


2320 


: CO 


00 


7 


FO 


00 


01 


FC 


80 


57 


24FO: 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


7 


00 


00 


FA 


2328 


: 00 


7F 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


A7 


24F8: 


OF 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


08 


2330 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


80 


00 


BO 


2500: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


01 


OF 


FF 


10 


2338 


: 01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


39 


2508: 


FF 


3F 


FF 


FF 


7F 


FF 


FF 


7F 


46 


2340 


: 00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


CI 


2510: 


FF 


FF 


FO 


00 


01 


EO 


00 


00 


E2 


2348 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


48 


2518: 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


5A 


2 3 50 


: FF 


FE 


80 


00 


F8 


00 


3 


EO 


AC 


2520: 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


60 


02 


2358 


: 00 


OF 


80 


00 


3E 


00 


00 


F8 


IF 


2528: 


00 


00 


78 


00 


01 


3F 


FF 


FF 


EO 


2360 


: 00 


03 


EO 


00 


OF 


80 


00 


3E 


12 


2530: 


IF 


FF 


FF 


07 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


56 


2368 


: 00 


01 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


69 


2538: 


01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


39 


2370 


: FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


7 


2540: 


00 


00 


01 


00 


00 


07 


00 


00 


48 


2378 


: 01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


79 


2548: 


3F 


00 


01 


FF 


00 


OF 


FF 


00 


97 


2380 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


FF 


FO 


3F 


FF 


BF 


2 5 50: 


7F 


F9 


03 


FF 


CO 


9F 


FE 


00 


2C 


2388 


FC 


7F 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


FO 


73 


2558: 


FF 


FO 


00 


FF 


80 


00 


FE 


00 


C8 


2390 


00 


OF 


EO 


00 


7 


CO 


00 


03 


4B 


2560: 


00 


9F 


EO 


00 


03 


FC 


00 


00 


EO 


2398 


CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


03 


CO 


00 


EO 


2568: 


7F 


80 


00 


OF 


Fl 


00 


01 


FF 


6A 


23A0: 


03 


CO 


00 


3 


CO 


00 


03 


EO 


OC 


25 70: 


00 


00 


3F 


00 


00 


7 


00 


00 


B6 


23A8- 


00 


07 


FO 


00 


OF 


7F 


FF 


FE 


2E 


2578: 


01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


79 


2360: 


7F 


FF 


FE 


3F 


FF 


FC 


OF 


FF 


7A 


2580: 


00 


00 


01 


00 


00 


7F 


00 


3F 


40 


23B8: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A9 


2588: 


FF 


IF 


FF 


F F 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


A7 


2 3CO: 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


01 


FF 


FF 


42 


2590: 


FF 


81 


FF 


CO 


00 


3F 


00 


00 


12 


23C8: 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


C8 


2598; 


OF 


FO 


00 


3 


FC 


00 


OF 


FO 


98 


23D0: 


FF 


FF 


80 


IS 


03 


00 


18 


03 


87 


2 5A0: 


00 


3F 


00 


00 


FF 


CO 


00 


FF 


AO 


23D8: 


00 


18 


03 


00 


18 


03 


00 


18 


27 


25A8: 


FF 


81 


FF 


FF 


FF 


IF 


FF 


FF 


49 


2 3EO: 


03 


00 


18 


03 


00 


18 


03 


00 


1A 


25B0: 


00 


3F 


FF 


00 


00 


7F 


00 


00 


6F 


23E8: 


1C 


07 


00 


IE 


OF 


00 


OF 


FE 


47 


25B8: 


01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B9 


23F0: 


00 


OF 


FE 


00 


7 


FC 


00 


03 


06 


2 5 CO: 


SO 


00 


01 


CO 


00 


7 


FO 


00 


FA 


23F8: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


E9 


25C8: 


IF 


FC 


00 


7F 


FF 


01 


FF 


IF 


84 


24 00: 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


FF 


FO 


3F 


FF 


3F 


2 5D0: 


C7 


F9 


07 


FF 


EO 


01 


FF 


80 


FB 


2408: 


FC 


7F 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


FO 


F2 


25D8: 


00 


7E 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


7E 


12 


2410: 


00 


OF 


EO 


00 


7 


CO 


00 


3 


CA 


2 5E0: 


00 


1 


FF 


80 


07 


FI- 


EO 


9F 


E9 


2418: 


CO 


00 


03 


C4 


00 


03 


cc 


00 


70 


2 5E8: 


E3 


F9 


FF 


80 


FF 


FE 


00 


3F 


85 


130 AHO 


n 







































2 5FO 


: F8 


00 


OF 


EO 


00 


03 


80 


00 


5D 


2 7 CO 


: 00 


00 


00 


F8 


00 


78 


FC 


00 


2F 


25F8 


: 01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F9 


27C8 


: FC 


FE 


00 


FE 


FF 


00 


FE 


FF 


C2 


2600 


: 00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


01 


00 


00 


01 


2 7 DO 


: 30 


9E 


E7 


CO 


OF 


E3 


CO 


7 


53 


2608 


: 07 


00 


00 


IF 


00 


00 


7F 


00 


AD 


27D8 


: El 


EO 


07 


EO 


FO 


07 


EO 


FO 


4D 


2610 


: 01 


FF 


00 


03 


F9 


80 


OF 


EO 


7E 


2 7E0 


: 7 


EO 


78 


07 


EO 


38 


7 


EO 


49 


2618 


: FF 


FF 


80 


FF 


FE 


00 


FF 


FC 


94 


27E8 


: 3C 


OF 


EO 


IE 


IF 


EO 


IF 


FE 


51 


2620 


: 00 


FF 


FE 


00 


80 


OF 


80 


00 


2F 


2 7FO 


: EO 


OF 


FE 


FO 


07 


FC 


F8 


01 


CE 


2628 


: 03 


EO 


00 


00 


F9 


00 


00 


3F 


45 


27F8 


: F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


Fl 


2630 


. 00 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


42 


2800 


: 00 


00 


00 


IE 


00 


IF 


3F 


00 


7C 


2638 


: 01 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


39 


2808 


: OF 


7F 


00 


07 


7F 


00 


07 


F9 


IE 


2640 


00 


00 


00 


FC 


00 


OF 


FE 


00 


4B 


2810 


: 00 


07 


FO 


00 


07 


EO 


00 


07 


F6 


2648 


7 


FF 


00 


03 


FF 


80 


03 


C7 


9D 


2818 


: EO 


08 


07 


EO 


OC 


07 


EO 


OE 


EA 


26 50 


CO 


3 


C3 


EO 


03 


CI 


FO 


03 


71 


2820 


: 7 


EO 


IF 


07 


EO 


IF 


87 


FO 


A6 


2658 


CO 


F8 


03 


CO 


7C 


03 


CO 


3E 


54 


2828 


3F 


C7 


F8 


79 


E7 


7F 


F8 


F7 


F9 


2660 


03 


CO 


IF 


03 


CO 


OF 


83 


CO 


5A 


2830 


7F 


FO 


7F 


3F 


EO 


3F 


IF 


80 


IF 


2668 


07 


C3 


CO 


03 


E3 


CO 


01 


FF 


9C 


2838 


IF 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


57 


2670 


CO 


00 


FF 


EO 


00 


7F 


FO 


00 


82 


2840 


00 


00 


00 


04 


00 


00 


07 


00 


4B 


2678 


3F 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B7 


2848 


00 


07 


CO 


00 


07 


EO 


00 


06 


FD 


2680 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


28 50' 


F8 


00 


06 


3E 


00 


06 


OF 


80 


23 


2688 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


88 


2858 


06 


03 


EO 


06 


00 


F8 


06 


00 


47 


2690 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


F8 


98 


2860 


3C 


86 


00 


OF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


32 


2698 


40 


7F 


FE 


E7 


FF 


FF 


E7 


FF 


27 


2868 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


68 


26AO 


FF 


40 


7F 


FE 


00 


OF 


F8 


00 


67 


2870 


86 


00 


00 


06 


00 


00 


06 


00 


03 


26A8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A8 


2878' 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


78 


26 BO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


BO 


2880: 


00 


00 


00 


IE 


07 


FF 


3F 


07 


EB 


26B8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B8 


2888 


FF 


7F 


07 


FF 


7F 


07 


FF 


F9 


8F 


26C0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


2890' 


07 


07 


FO 


07 


07 


EO 


7 


07 


8C 


26C8 


78 


00 


00 


FC 


00 


00 


8E 


00 


CC 


2898 


EO 


07 


07 


EO 


07 


07 


EO 


07 


5E 


2 6 DO 


01 


C6 


00 


01 


C7 


01 


80 


C3 


A6 


28A0: 


07 


EO 


07 


7 


EO 


07 


07 


FO 


76 


26D8 


43 


CO 


03 


E3 


EO 


03 


E6 


60 


EE 


28A8: 


OF 


07 


F8 


IF 


07 


7F 


FE 


07 


63 


26 EO 


03 


40 


30 


03 


00 


30 


07 


00 


8E 


28B0: 


7F 


FE 


07 


3F 


FC 


OF 


IF 


FO 


91 


26E8 


18 


07 


00 


IC 


OE 


00 


OF 


FE 


40 


28B8: 


IF 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


D7 


26F0 


00 


7 


FC 


00 


01 


FO 


00 


00 


E6 


28C0: 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


FF 


FO 


3F 


FF 


FF 


26F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F8 


28C8: 


FC 


7F 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


F8 


BB 


2700- 


00 


00 


00 


7 


01 


CO 


OF 


87 


5F 


28D0: 


78 


IF 


FO 


38 


OF 


EO 


IC 


07 


A4 


2 708 


FO 


IC 


8F 


F8 


18 


OE 


38 


38 


34 


28D8: 


EO 


IC 


07 


EO 


IC 


07 


EO 


IC 


DD 


2710- 


IC 


IC 


30 


IC 


IC 


FF 


FF 


FF 


BO 


28 EO: 


07 


EO 


IC 


07 


EO 


IC 


07 


FO 


EO 


2718 


FF 


FF 


FF 


30 


18 


OC 


30 


18 


B4 


28E8: 


3C 


OF 


F8 


7C 


3F 


7F 


F8 


3E 


9F 


2720 


OC 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


38 


64 


28F0: 


7F 


F8 


3E 


3F 


FO 


3C 


OF 


CO 


E3 


2728 


38 


OC 


38 


38 


IC 


IC 


70 


18 


9D 


28F8: 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


29 


2730: 


IF 


Fl 


38 


OF 


El 


FO 


03 


80 


DE 


2900: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


IF 


00 


00 


IF 


2738 


EO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


19 


2908: 


OF 


00 


00 


07 


00 


00 


07 


70 


95 


2 740: 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


FF 


FO 


3F 


FF 


7F 


2910: 


00 


07 


FC 


00 


07 


FF 


00 


07 


22 


2748: 


FC 


7F 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


FB 


3E 


2918: 


FF 


CO 


7 


FF 


EO 


07 


8F 


FO 


48 


2750. 


CO 


IF 


Fl 


EO 


OF 


EO 


FO 


7 


EA 


2920: 


7 


01 


FC 


07 


00 


7E 


07 


00 


Bl 


2758 


EO 


78 


7 


EO 


3C 


07 


EO 


IE 


DB 


2928: 


3F 


87 


00 


OF 


E7 


00 


03 


FF 


E8 


2760: 


07 


EO 


OF 


7 


EO 


07 


87 


FO 


BE 


2930: 


00 


00 


FF 


00 


00 


3F 


00 


00 


6F 


2768 


03 


CF 


F8 


01 


FF 


7F 


FF 


FE 


B3 


2938: 


IF 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


57 


2770 


7F 


FF 


FE 


3F 


FF 


FC 


OF 


FF 


3A 


2940: 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


80 


FO 


3F 


E.3 


E3 


2778 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


69 


2948: 


FC 


7F 


F7 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FE 


F8 


33 


27 80 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


2950: 


7F 


IF 


FO 


3E 


OF 


EO 


IC 


07 


31 


2788 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


88 


2958: 


EO 


IC 


07 


EO 


IC 


07 


EO 


IC 


5D 


2 790: 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


18 


CO 


00 


18 


42 


2960: 


07 


EO 


IC 


7 


EO 


IC 


07 


FO 


60 


2 798, 


FF 


FF 


FC 


FF 


FF 


FE 


FF 


FF 


94 


2968: 


3E 


OF 


F8 


7F 


IF 


7F 


FF 


FE 


CB 


2 7AO- 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


22 


2970: 


7F 


F7 


FE 


3F 


E3 


FC 


OF 


80 


96 


2 7A8: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A8 


2978: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


69 


2 7 BO: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


BO 


2980: 


00 


00 


00 


OC 


03 


FO 


3C 


OF 


CB 


27B8: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B8 


2988: 


FC 


7C 


IF 


FE 


7C 


IF 


FE 


FC 


B7 




































AHOY! 


131 



I IUI PORTA MTI '- e " ers on wnit!; background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter theml Pages 113 and 116 explain these codes 
I III rUri I fill I ! and provide other essential information on entering Ahoy! programs. Reler to these pages before entering any programs! 



2990: 


3E 


IF 


F0 


3C 


OF 


EO 


38 


07 


4A 


2998: 


E0 


38 


07 


EO 


38 


07 


EO 


38 


Fl 


29A0: 


07 


EO 


38 


07 


EO 


38 


07 


FO 


D8 


29A8: 


1C 


OF 


F8 


IE 


IF 


7F 


FF 


FE 


88 


29B0: 


7F 


FF 


FE 


3F 


FF 


FC 


OF 


FF 


7A 


29B8: 


FO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A9 


29C0: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


18 


D8 


29C8: 


00 


00 


18 


00 


18 


18 


18 


IE 


47 


29 DO: 


18 


78 


7 


99 


EO 


01 


FF 


80 


64 


29D8: 


00 


FE 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


3C 


50 


29E0: 


00 


00 


FE 


00 


01 


FF 


80 


07 


68 


29E8: 


99 


EO 


IE 


18 


78 


18 


18 


18 


5A 


29FO: 


00 


18 


00 


00 


18 


00 


00 


00 


21 


29P8: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F8 



FROM PAGE 110 



REM ******************************* CE 

1 REM * * 00 

2 REM * — INFRARAID — * CO 

3 REM * ERROR TRAPPING FOR THE C-64 * MA 

4 REM * * 00 

5 REM * AUTHOR: TIMOTHY VANDEVENTER * DN 

6 REM * 3851 E. EATON HWY. * JG 

7 REM * SUN FIELD, MI 48890 * OL 

8 REM * * 00 

9 REM ******************************* ce 

10 POKE53281,O:P0KE53280,0: PRINT" [CLEAR] 
[GREEN]" DN 
15 FORI=50176T050670 BF 
20 READA:CS=CS+A:LN=100+INT((I-50176)/7) 
*10 NC 
30 IFA>2550RA<OTHENPRINT : PRINT" [ RED ] BAD 
DATA IN LINE"LN:STOP NM' 
40 POKEI,A:PRINTLN;:X=X+l:IFX-7THENX-0:P 
RINT PC 
50 NEXT I A 
60 IFCS<>65731THENPRINT:PRINT"[RED]CHECK 
SUM ERROR. CHECK ALL DATA.": STOP DP 
70 PRINT: PRINT" [CLEAR ][ 4" [ DOWN]"] [GREEN] 
INFRARAID LOADED!" BL 
80 PRINT" [DOWN] [DOWN] DO YOU WISH TO SAVE 

TO [ RED] D[ GREEN ]ISK OR [ RED ]T[ GREEN] APE 
?" GI 

•82 GETC$:IFC$<>"T"ANDC$<>"D"THEN82 GI 
■84 IFC$="T"THEN92 FM 

■ 86 P0KE43 , : P0KE44 , 196 : POKE45 , 239 : POKE46 
,197 Lll 

■88 SAVE"INFRARAID(50176)",8,1 MM 

■90 G0T098 AH 

■92 P0KE43,0:P0KE44,196:P0KE45,239:P0KE46 
,197 LH 

■94 SAVE"INFRARAID( 50176)",!, 1 MB 

132 AHOYl 



98 POKE43,l:POKE44,8:P0KE45,l:P0KE46,8 HB 

99 PRINT" [DOWN] TO ACTIVATE, ENTER [RED]S 
YS 501 76": END FB 

100 DATA 173,0,3,205,235,197,240 CO 
110 DATA 3,141,225,197,173,1,3 NB 
120 DATA 205,236,197,240,15,141,226 JB 
130 DATA 197,173,235,197,141,0,3 CO 
140 DATA 173,236,197,141,1,3,32 II 
150 DATA 99,197,76,125,197,142,237 LI 
160 DATA 197,32,189,197,32,99,197 MI 
170 DATA 224,128,240,6,165,58,201 NM 
180 DATA 255,208,3,76,17,197,32 CO 
190 DATA 125,197,240,74,224,15,208 PH 
200 DATA 12,41,1,240,66,173,238 MH 
210 DATA 197,208,45,104,104,96,224 LC 
220 DATA 20,208,10,41,2,240,50 JO 
230 DATA 173,238,197,208,29,96,224 KM 
240 DATA 4,208,10,41,4,240,36 PM 
250 DATA 173,238,197,208,15,96,224 MJ 
260 DATA 5,208,26,41,8,240,22 IIL 
270 DATA 173,238,197,208,1,96,173 FD 
280 DATA 227,197,133,20,173,228,197 IL 
290 DATA 133,21,32,163,168,76,174 CA 
300 DATA 167,169,32,162,255,232,157 DO 
310 DATA 0,4,157,250,4,157,244 FO 
320 DATA 5,157,238,6,224,250,208 MC 
330 DATA 239,162,255,232,181,217,9 LM 
340 DATA 128,149,217,224,25,208,245 ND 
350 DATA 169,14,141,32,208,169,6 NG : 
360 DATA 141,33,208,169,14,141,134 JC 
370 DATA 2,24,162,1,134,214,160 MG 
380 DATA 0,132,211,32,240,255,169 10 
390 DATA 0,133,19,133,184,165,57 KL 
400 DATA 133,20,165,58,133,21,32 GH 
410 DATA 19,166,144,44,160,2,132 LL 
420 DATA 15,177,95,170,200,177,95 KN 
430 DATA 132,73,32,205,189,169,32 GO. 
440 DATA 164,73,41,127,32,210,255 LN 
450 DATA 201,34,208,6,165,15,73 BC 
460 DATA 255,133,15,200,240,7,32 UN 
470 DATA 60,197,177,95,208,11,174 CP 
480 DATA 237,197,169,14,141,134,2 BH 
490 DATA 108,225,197,16,220,201,255 DF 
500 DATA 240,216,36,15,48,212,56 FI 
510 DATA 233,127,170,132,73,160,255 JL 
520 DATA 202,240,8,200,185,158,160 MA 
530 DATA 16,250,48,245,200,185,158 KG 
540 DATA 160,48,183,32,210,255,208 JC 
550 DATA 245,132,73,169,14,141,134 GJ 
560 DATA 2,152,24,101,95,197,122 PC 
570 DATA 240,16,200,24,105,1,197 KN 
580 DATA 122,208,13,177,95,240,4 CA 
590 DATA 201,58,208,5,169,1,141 HE 
600 DATA 134,2,164,73,96,173,229 CG 
610 DATA 197,133,69,173,230,197,133 LJ 
620 DATA 70,32,231,176,160,0,152 MH 



630 DATA 145,71,174,237,197,200,138 
640 DATA 145,71,96,173,231,197,133 
650 DATA 69,173,232,197,133,70,32 
660 DATA 231,176,169,237,141,40,3 
670 DATA 169,246,141,41,3,169,237 
680 DATA 141,40,3,160,0,177,71 
690 DATA 41,32,240,5,169,239,141 
700 DATA 40,3,177,71,41,64,240 
710 DATA 10,169,188,141,41,3,169 
720 DATA 54,141,40,3,200,177,71 
730 DATA 174,237,197,96,173,233,197 
740 DATA 133,69,173,234,197,133,70 
750 DATA 32,231,176,160,0,177,71 
760 DATA 141,228,197,141.238.197,200 
770 DATA 177,71,141,227,197,13,238 
780 DATA 197,141,238,197,96,139,227 
790 DATA 0,0,197,210,212,210,197 
800 DATA 204,40,196,128,0 



FROM PAGE 89 



•10 REM MICRO FLIGHT SIMULATOR OF 

•15 REM BY TIM GERCHMEZ GN 

•20 IFPEEK(49152)=169ANDPEEK(49158)=69THE 

N30 PC 

•25 FORT=49152TO49152+36:REA0A:POKET,A:NE 

XT NJ 

•30 P0KE53265,27:POKE56333,127:P0KK788,0: 

POKE789 , 192 :P0KE53274 , 129 liK 

•35 POKE53281,0:POKE646,1:POKE650,128:POK 

F49169, 2: P0KE49167 , 255 : P0KE49160, 1 1 CK 
•40 PRINTCHR$(147)CHR$(9)CHR$(15)CHR$(8)" 

[DOWN ] [DOWN]' 1 ; :R1$="[10" [RIGHT]" ]":LF$=" 

[7" [LEFT]"]" OM 

•45 L6$="[6"[LEFT]"]":DN$="[H0ME][11"[D0W 

N]"]" NF 

•46 DIMJ(127):J(109)=45:J(126)=85:J(125)» 

68: J( 123)^44 : J(119)=46: J{110)=43 HH 
•47 JY=56320:KB=631:KJ-198 JB 

•50 PRINT"[RED][7"[s *]"][c E][22"[s *]"] 

[c E][9"[s *]"][UP][UP][7"[RIGHT]"]"; FP 
•55 PRINT"[s B][WHITE]MICRO FLIGHT SIMULA 

TOR [ RED] [s B][H0ME][7"[RIGHT]"][s U V[ 22" 

[s C]"][s I] [HOME]" CK 

•60 PRINT" [D0WN][ DOWN] [CYAN ][s U][6"[s C] 

"][s I]":PRINT"[s B][6" "][s B]":PRINT"[ 

s J][6"[s C]"][s K]": PRINT" [RIGHT] [RIGHT 

J [ YELLOW ]TTME[CYAN]" GK 

■65 PRINT"[s U][7"[s C]"][s I]":PRINT"[s 

B][7" "}[a B]":PRINT"[s J][7"[s C]"][s K 

]": PRINT" [ RIGHT ][ RIGHT ][ YELLOW ]ERPM[ CYAN 

]" IP 

•70 PRINT"[s U][8"[s C]"][s I]":PRINT"[s 
B][8" "][s B]":PRINT"[s J][8"[s C]"][s K 
]": PR1NT"[ RIGHT] [YELLOW] AIRSPEED" NF 
•75 PRINT"[3"[RIGHT]"]KTS[CYAN]":PRINT"[s 



KN U][U"[s C] M ][s I]":PRINT"[s B][ll" "][ 
HP s B]":PRINT"[s J][ll"[s C]"][s K]" PF 
KK -80 PRINT" [RIGHT] [YE1 .LOW ]GROUNDSPEED":PRI 
GG NT"[5"[RIGHT]"]MPH" JK 

KJ -85 PRINT" [ HOME ][ 3" [ DOWN ]"](CY AN ]"Rl$"[s 
IM U][9"[s C]"][s I]":PRINTRl$"[s B][9" "][ 
KB s B]":PRINTRlS"[s J][9"[s C]"][s K]" KA 
HA -90 PRINTRl$"[RIGHT][c 1]ALTIMETER[CYAN]" FL 
01 -95 PRINTRl$"[s U][6"[s C]"][s I]";PRINTR 
MF l$"[s B][6" "][s B]":PRINTRl$"[s J][6"[s 
PG C]"][s K]" JO 

JM -100 PRINTRl$"[RIGHT][c 3]RUDDER[CYAN][3" 
AP [UP]"][RIGHT][RIGHT][s U][5"[s C]"][s I] 
PL [D0WN]"LF$"[s B][5" "][s B][D0WN]"LF$"[s 
GP J][5"[s C]"][s K][D0WN]"L6S"ELEV." KB 
EG -105 PRINTRl$"[s U][7"[s C]"][s I]":PRINT 
JL Rl$"[s B][7" "][s B] M MF 

ME -110 PRINTRl$"[s J][7"[s C]"][s K]": PRINT 

Rl$"[ RIGHT] [WHITE]HEADING[CYAN] M JA 
•115 R2$="[11"[RIGHT]"]" OA 

•120 Rl$="[19"[ RIGHT ]"]":PRINTR1$"[D0WN] [ 
s U][4"[s C]"][s I][WHITE][UP][UP][5"[LE 

— FT]"]BI>[CYAN][DOWN][DOWN]":PRINTRl$"[s 

B]FUEL[s B]" HG 

125 PRINTRl$"[s B][4"[s C]"][s B]":PRINT 
Rl$"[s B][GREEN]F[CYAN][3" "][s B]":PRIN 
TRl$"[s B][4" "][s B]":PRINTRl$"[s B][4" 

"][s B]" IJ 

130 PRINTRl$"[s B][RED]E[CYAN][3" "][s B 
]":PRINTRl$"[s J][4"[s C]"][s K]" AG 
135 PRINT" [ UP] [ UP] [4"[ RIGHT]"] [WHITE] [s 
Q]": PRINT" [ RIGHT ][ RIGHT] [c 8]STALL[3"[RI 
GHT]"][WHITE]0IL TEMP[UP]"LF$"[LEFT][LEF 
T][CYAN][s J][8"[s C]"][s K]"; HA 

140 PRINT"[UP]"LF$"[3"[LEFT]"][s B][WHIT 
E]C[6" "]H[CYAN][s B] [UP]"LF$"[3 ,, [LEFT]" 
][s U][8"[s C]"][s I]"j DB 

145 PRINT"[UP][UP][5"[LEFr]"][s J][s C][ 
s K ] [ DOWN ] [ I, EFT ] [ LEFT ] P [ UP ] [ UP ] [ LEFT ] [ LE 
FT][s B][RVS0N] [WHITE] [RVS0FF][CYAN] [s 
B][UP][3"[LEFT]"][s U][s C][s I] M BF 
150 PRINTDN$ M [DOWN] ,t Rl$" [RIGHT] [YELL0W]F 
LAPS" MD 

155 PRINT" [CYAN] [HOME] [3"[D0WN]"]"R1$"[R 
IGI1T ][ RIGHT] [s U][3"[s C]"][s I][D0WN]"L 
6$"[RIGHT][s B][RVS0N][WHITE][3" "][CYAN 
][RVS0FF][s B][D0WNj"L6$"[RIGHT][s J] [3" 
[s C]"][s K]"; DE 

160 PRINT"[D0WN]"L6S"[RIGHT][RIGHT]CWI" BA 
165 G0SUB255 CK 

170 P0KE198.0 KB 

175 GETA$:IFA$O m, THEN180 CP 

176 P0KEU,1:P0KEKB,J(PEEK(JY)):GETA$:IF 
A$=""THENG0SUB450 : G0T0245 DO 
180 IFA$="0"THENIFGD=1ANDGS=0THEN935 HK 
185 IFA$="X"THENG0SUB605 :GOT0245 GD 
190 IFA$="H"THENG0SUB635 :G0T0245 10 
195 IFA$="+"0RA$="-"THENG0SUB680 :G0T02 

AHOY! 133 



45 

200 IFA$="R"THENFP=l:GOT0245 

205 IFA$=' 'L"THENFP=0 : GOT0245 

210 IFA$="<"0RA$=","THENRU=RU+(RU>-45):P 

RINTRU$;RU;S$ 

215 IFA$=">"ORA$="."THENRU=RU-(RU<45):PR 

INTRU$;RU;S$ 

220 IFA$="U"THENEL=EL-(EL<45) :PRINTEL$;E 

L;S$:G0T0245 

225 IFA$="D"THENEL=EL+(EL>-45):PRINTEL$; 
EL;S$:G0T0245 

226 IFA$>"O"ANDA$<"8"THENG0SUB120O 
228 IFA$="0"Tf]ENGOSUB251 

230 IFRU=0THENPRINTP8$ 
235 IFRU<0THENPRINTP7$ 
240 IFRU>0THENPRINTP9$ 
245 IF DOTH EN RETURN 

250 GOTO I 75 

25 1 FY=FY+6 : I FFY>6THENFY=0 

252 IFFY=0 THEN PRINTDN$RX$"[WHITE]NIGHT 
":POKE49160,0:GOT0254 

253 PRINTDN$RX$"[WHITE]DAY ":POKE49160, 
11 

254 PRINTRX$"FLYING": RETURN 

255 REM DEFINE VARIABLES + SET UP 

260 MJ$=" [ 8" [ DOWN ] " ] " :TM$=" [ HOME ] [ 4" [ DOW 

N]"][ RIGHT ]":ER$="[HOME]"+MJ$+"[ RIGHT]": 

AS$~DN$+" [ DOWN ] [RIGHT ] " 

265 GS$=DN$+"[6"[D0WN]"] [RIGHT]" :AT$="[H 

OME][4"[DOWN]"]"+R2$ 

270 CL$="[HOME][4"[DOWN]"]"+Rl$+ M [3"[RIG 

HT]"]" 

275 EL$="[HOME] [ 8" [ DOWN ]"]"+Rl$+"[ RIGHT] 

280 FP$=DN$+" [ DOWN ] [ DOWN ] "+R1$+" [ RIGHT ] " 
:FP=1 

285 P7$=FP$+"[RED][4"[RIGHT]"][D0WN][3" 
"][LEFT][UP][s N][DOWN] [LEFT ][ LEFT] [s Q] 
[DOWN] [LEFT] [ LEFT] [s N]":P8$=FP$+"[4"[RI 
GHT]"][3" "][ DOWN ][ DOWN ][3"[ LEFT]"] [3" " 
][UP][3"[LEFT]"][GREEN][s C][s Q][s C] M 
290 P9$=FP$-s-"[RED][4"[RIGHT]"][DOWN][3" 
"][UP][3"[LEFT]"][s M][DOWN][s Q][DOWN][ 
s M]" 

295 IFQ0>120ORAS>12OTHENAS=120:Q0=120 
300 RU$=" [ HOME ] "+MJ$+R2$ : HE$=DN$+" [ DOWN ] 
"+R2$:S$="[LEFT] " 

305 PR$=DN$+"[6"[DOWN3"]"+R2$+"[4"[RIGHT 
VI" 

306 A$="[6"[DOWN]"]":B$="[25"[RIGHT]"]": 
I1$-DN $+A$+B$:I2$=DN$+" [DOWN] [DOWN] "+A$+ 
B$ 

307 I3$=DN$+" [ 4" [ DOWN ] " ] "+A$+B$ : I4$=DN$+ 
"[6"[D0WN]"]"+A$+B$ 

308 IN$«"[s Z]":PRINTI1$"[RED]"IN$"[WHIT 
E]1"I2$ M [RED]"IN$"[WHITE]2"I3$IN$"3"I4$" 
[GREEN] "IN$"[WHITE]4[RED]" 

310 DIMFL$(2):FL$(l)=DN$+MJ$+"[3"[DOWN]" 



OG 
MI 
OP 

JO 

FI 

NN 

LE 
DE 
NP 
PK 
CC 
PK 
FN 
CL 
FB 

JG 

AM 
FC 

Ml) 



DL 
OB 

JG 
HJ 
EG 



NA 

MN 
CL 

KC 

GP 

MB 
IG 

AI 



]"+Rl$+"[4"[RIGHT]"]":FL$(2)=FL$(l) f() 
31 5 OT$=DN$+MJ$+" [ DOWN ] [ DOWN ] "+R2$+" [ 5" [ 
RIGHT]"]" ML 

320 ER-800 : AS=90: GS=AS : AT=GS : RU-AT : HE-RU 
:EL=HE:F1=235;F2=2:F3=0:F4=6:W=2 EB 
325 SW=56180:SI=F3:GD=1:Q0=0:DG=Q0:DQ=0: 
ML=0: 11=1 ; 12=1 : 13=0: 14=1 :B0=49169 DN 
327 I5=O:I6=0:I7=0:KX=0:FY=6 CC 

330 S=54272 : FORT-STOS+24 : POKET , 0: NEXT: PO 
KES+6, 240: POKES, Fl:P0KES+l t F2 EG 

335 POK ES+4, 33 :POKES+24,15:POKES+ 13,240: 
POK ES+7 , F3 : POK ES+8 , F4 : POKES+ 11,17 GP 
340 PRINT"[ WHrni] M TM$;TI$:PRINTP8$"[ WHIT 
E]" MA 

345 F0RX=90T01STEP-W:P0KESW,2 UK 

350 PRINTERS ; ER ; S$ ; AS$ ; AS ; S$ ; GS$ ;GS ; S$ ; A 
T$;AT;S$;RU$;RU;S$;HE$;HE;S$;FL$(1)"[BAC 
KARROW]" OA 

355 PRINTEL$;EL;S$:EUEL-W AI 

360 PRINTOT$"[RED][UPARROW][WHITE]";:IFX 
/18-INT(X/18)THENPRINT0f$" "; :OT$=LEFT$( 
0T$,LEN(0T$)-1) PO 

365 ER-ER-W: AS-AS-W: GS=GS-W: AT=AT-W: RU=R 
U-W:HE=HE+W:F1=F1-.5:P0KES,F1:P0KESW,1 OD 
370 F2«F2-.021:POKES+l,F2 JL 

372 IFX=300RX«600RX=90THENPRXNTFL$(1)" " 
:FL$(1)=FL$(1) + ,, [UP]";FL$(2)=FL$C2)+"[UP 
]" FE 

375 NEXT : TI$=" [ 6"0" ] " : PRINTTMS ; TI$ ; FP$ ; " 
[YELLOW] UP " OH 

380 POKES+15,75:POKES+20,240:POKES+18,17 
:FORT=1T0300:NEXT AE 

385 P0KES+15,50:F0RX=1T0300:NEXT:P0KES+1 
8,16 hh 

390 RX$=R1$+"[8"[RIGHT]"J" AL 

392 PRINTDN$RX$" [WHITE] [LEFT] [UP] [UP] [c 
D] ,, :PRINTDN$RX$"[LEKT][UP][c D]":PRINTDN 
$RX$"[LEFT][c D]" HA 

395 P R I NT" [ HOM E ] [ R ED ] [ DOWN ] [ DOWN ] " RX $ " [ c 

R]" ; : F0RT=1T022 : PRINT" [ DOWN] [ LEFT] [ s B] 
";:NEXT PJ 

400 RX$=RX$+"[RIGHT]":PRINT"[H0ME][3"[D0 
WN]"][WHITE]"RX$;"+ - ENGINE": PRINTRX$"< 

> RUDDER" AP 

405 PRINTRX$"U D ELEVATOR" :PRINTRX$"[ UP] 
R L FLAPS" :PRINTRX$"H HEAR ATIS" BM 
410 PRINTRX$"X REFUEL": PRINTRX$"0 DEMO" GE 
415 PRINTRX$"[RED][LEFT][c Q][ll"[s C]"] 
" ; : P0KE1463 , 67 : POKE1463+S , 2 KN 

420 PRINTRX$"[RED][RIGHT]CABIN":PRINTRX$ 
"PRESSURE" : PRINTRX$"0N[ W!l ITE]" : PRINTPR$" 
[RVSON][RED] [RVSOFF] [WHITE]" BF 

425 POKES+15,255:POKES+18,16:POKES+18,12 
9 AI 

430 PRINTTMS ;TI$ : IFTI$<>" [ 4"0" ] 16"THEN43 
" GG 

435 PRINTDN$;RX$;"[5" "]" MC 

440 PRINTRX$"[8" " ]":PRINTRX$" ":POKES+ 



754 AHOY! 



18,128: POKES+15,90:POKES+18,17 

445 PRINTPR$"[RVSON][WHITE] [RVSOFF]" 

446 T-INTC 8000*RND( 1 ) )+1000 : U=INT( 300*RN 
D(1))+200:Y1=T+U:Y2=T-U:G0SUB875 

448 RETURN 

450 PRINT"[WHITE]"EL$;EL;S$;TM$;TI$;ER$; 

ER;S$;AS$;AS;S$;GS$;GS;S$;AT$;AT;S$ 

465 PRINTRU$;RU;S$;HE$;HE;S$;:PC=RND(1) 

470 IFAT>31000THENP0KES+4 , 32 : G0SUB895 :G0 

SU 13845 :G0T08 20 

475 IFAS>100THENIFEL>30THENGOSUB900:GOSU 

B845:G0T0820 

480 IFPC>.997THENIFLEN(0T$)<38THENPRINT0 

T$" ":0T$=0T$+"[ RIGHT]"; PR INT0T$"[ RED] [U 

PARROW][ WHITE]" 

485 IFF2<1THENGS=0 

487 KX=KX+l:KX-KX~.2*(I5=l)-.5*(I6=l)-.5 

*(I7=1) 

490 IFPC>.98ANDDG=0ANDAT>5000THENPRINTCL 

$"[RED][RVS0N][3" "] [RVSOFF] [WHITE]" :DG= 

1:D3»HE:D8-0:GOSUB890 

495 IFDG=1THEND8=D8+1:GOSUB910 

500 IFGS>10RAS>1THENIFPC>.88THSNGS=GS-1: 

Q0=Q0-2:F1=F1-10:ER=ER+20*(ER>0) 

505 IFFK0THENF1»255:F2«F2-1:IFF2<0THENF 

2=0 

510 POKES ,Fl:P0KES+l t F2 

515 IFSITHENP0KESW,2:P0KES+18,17:P0KES+1 

5, 5O:AT=AT+D9*(AT>0) :D9=D9+24:GOT0525 

520 POKESW,1:POKES+18,16:D9-15:GOT0530 

525 P0KES+1.D9 AND3 

530 IFGD=OTHENGOSUB745:IFCD=OTHKNSI=-(AS 

<10):IFAS<30THENIFEL>20THENSI»1 

535 IFGD=0ANDER<300THHNPOKES+4 , 32:GOSUB8 

G0SUB845:G0T0820 

IFAT<=0ANDGD=0THEN820 

IFAS<QOTHENAS=QO 

IFEL>40ANDGD=0THENSI=1 

[FFPTHENPRINTFP$"[ YELLOW ]UP ":G0TO5 



95 

540 

545 

550 

555 

65 

560 

565 

570 

575 



PR 1NTFP$"[ YELLOW] DOWN": 

IFGD=OTHENGS=0 : IFAT<=10THENAT=10 

IFEL<=40ANDAS>=10THENSI=0 

I FGD-1THEN I FFP=OTHEN I FEL> 20THEN I FGS> 
60THENGD=0 : AT=30 : AS=GS : GS=0:GOSUB602 
580 IFAT<=OTHENAT=0 
585 IFKX>300THENKX=0:G0SUB800 
590 IFGD=0THENAS=AS-1 : IFPC>.7THENB=AS+1 
:IFPC>.8THENAS=AS+1 
595 TFGD=0THENIFAS>1 2OTHENAS=120 
600 RETURN 

602 Q0=AS:TI$="[6"0"J":POKEBO,FY:C0=0:MX 
=0: RETURN 

605 IFGD01THEN625 
610 PRINTFL$(I4)" "; 

615 IFLEN( FL$( 1 } )<49THENFL$( 1 )=FL$( 1 )+" [ 
UP]":GOT0615 
620 FL$(2)»FL$C1) : PRINTFL$( 14)" [WHITE] [B 



KN 
FO 

OH 
IM 

EM 
IH 

DA 

CC 



GA 
AO 

EM 



PC 
KI 

GJ 

KN 
CE 

AM 
KK 
II J 

BF 

FM 
OF 
LA 
IE 

AH 
JO 
KH 
GI 

BA 
MK 
AF 

NL 
HP 

IM 

GO 
PH 

JL 

DN 



ACKARROW]";: RETURN AK 

625 PRINTDN$"[13"[ DOWN]" ] , 'R2$"[5"[ RIGHT] 
"UWHITElGROUND ONLY": CP 

630 F0RX-1T0 1000: NEXT: PRINT" [11" [LEFT]"] 
[11" "]";: RETURN AK 

635 PRINTDN$RX$" [YELLOW JTERMINAL" : PRINTR 
X$"INFORMATION":PRINTRX$"SERVICE" JM 
640 T1=65:F0RX=1T010:T1=T1+(RND(1)>.5):N 
EXT :PRINTRX$"[ WHITE ][ DOWN ]TEMP:"T1 BA 

645 PRINTRX$"ALT:29.95":T1=INT(15*RND(1) 
)+10:PRINTRX$"VIS:"Tl ME 

646 PRINTRX?"TNMT: M ML LN 
650 IFRND( 1 ) > . 5THENA$="ALPHA [ 3" , " ]" : GOTO 
665 NF 
655 IFRND(1)>.5THENA$="BRAV0[3"."]":G0T0 
665 OA 
660 A$="CHARLEY[3"."]" OC 
665 PRINTRX$"[ YELLOW] [DOWN ]THIS":PRINTRX 
$"IS":PRINTRX$;A$:Z0=PEEK(161)+2 OC 
670 PRINT" [ WHITE] "TM$ ; TI$ ; :0N-( PEEK (161) 
<>Z0)G0T0670 : PRINTDN$ ; KJ 
675 F0RX=1T012:PRINTRX$"[11" "]":NEXT:IF 
D0TIIENG0SUB1030 MI 
677 RETURN IM 
680 IFA$="-"THEN715 JB 
685 IFF2>»5THENRETURN NN 
690 F1-F1+10:IFF1>255THENF1-0:F2=F2+1 DB 
695 IFGDTHENGS=GS+l:Q0=O:GOTO71O HC 
700 QO-QO+3 : IFQ0>1 20THENQ0.1 20 01 
705 IFQO>=ASTHENAS=QO HB 
710 ER=ER+20:GOT0740 HM 
715 IFF2<=.25THEN740 CM 
720 IFF2-.25 ANDFK-235T1IEN740 MF 
725 IFGD=1THENGS=GS-1 : AS=0:QO=0: IFGS<OTH 
ENGS-0 AE 
730 IFGD=0THENO0=Q0-3:IFQ0<0THENQO=O PF 
735 F1=F1-10:ER=ER-20:IFFK0THENFU255:F 
2=F2-1 00 
740 POKES, F1:P0KES+1,F2:PRINT"[RED]"AS$; 

AS ; S$ ; GS$ ; GS ; S$ ; ER$ ; ER ; S$ : RETURN GF 
745 IF((EL>~4ANDEL<5)AND(AS<80))THENIF(A 
T<20ANDFP=1 ) AND( 11=1 )THEN790 EH 

747 Z7=AT NI 

750 AT»AT+(SGN(EL)*(.1*AS)+2.5*EL)+2*PC: 
IFAT>32000THENAT=32000 BE 

760 AT=AT-2*(FP=0):AT=AT+2*(RU<-30 OR RU 
>30):IFEL=-1THENAT=Z7:AT-AT-INT(2*PC) DJ 

762 IFAS<40ANDEL>30THENG0SUB845:G0T0820 OK 

763 IF(RU>400RRU<-40)ANDAS>50THENGOSUB86 
6:G0SUB845:G0T0820 GK 

765 IFEL=0THENAT=Z7:T=INT(PC*5) :AT=AT+(T 
*(AS<40)):AT=AT-(T#(AS>95)) LI 

766 IFAT<Y1ANDAT>Y2THENPOKEBO,1:COT0770 IF 

767 P0KEBO,FY PL 
770 HE=HE+((AS/100)*RU):IIE=INT(HE):IFHE< 
OTHENHE=359 ED 
775 IFHE>359THENHE=0 IB 
780 IFAS<30ANDEL=0THENZZ=30-AS:AT=AT-ZZ FN 

AHOY! 135 



I M DHDTA MTI Letters on white background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter them! Pages 113 and 116 explain these codes 
IIVIlUnlHIM: I ! and provide other essential information on entering Ahoy! programs. Refer to these pages before entering any programs! 



JE 
HM 

I) I 

JB 



lit: 

CD 
PP 
CD 
XI] 



785 C0=C0+1 :MX=AS*(TI/60/60/60) :MT=MT+MX 

/CO: ML-INT(MT) : AT»INT( AT) : RETURN GM 

790 GD=1 : GS-AS : AS-0 : Q0=0 : I FABS ( RU) >15T HE 

N820 

795 POK EBO , 2 : AT=0 : GOS U B8 7 5 : R ET URN 

800 PRINTFL$(I4)" "; :IFGD=0THENFL$(I4)=L 

EFT$(FL$(I4),LEN(FL$(I4))~1) 

810 IFLEN(FL$(I4);<46THENG0SUB845:GOT082 



815 M2=M1:PRINTFL$(I4}"[WHITE][BACKARR0W 

]": RETURN 

820 PRINT" [ HOME ] [ 18" [ DOWN ] " J "RX$" [ WHITE ] 

CRASH II": POKE54290, .16 : P0KE54276, 32 

825 IFLEN(FL$(I4))<46THENPRINTRX$ M [D0WN| 

[DOWN] FUEL GONE!" 

830 POKE54287.5 

835 POKE 54 29 0,129 

840 FORX=1T03000: NEXT: RUN 

845 AS=300:AT-INT(AT) :F0RX=5T00STEP-1 :P0 

KES+1 , X : FORY=255TOOSTEP~5 : POKES , Y 

850 IFAT<=OTHENRETURN 

855 AT=AT-100:PRINTTMS ;TI S ; AT$ ; AT;S$ ; AS$ 

;AS;S$ 

860 NEXT: IFX=3Tf!ENCOSUB870 

865 NEXT: RETURN 

866 POKES+1 , F2+1 : FORT-1T060O : NEXT: POKES+ 
1 , F2+2 : FORT-1T0600 : NEXT : POKES+1 , F2+3 

867 F0RT=1T0600: NEXT: RETURN 
870 POKES+1 8, 129 : POKES+1 5 , 200 : RETURN 
875 GOSUB880: F0RX= 1 TO 500 : NEXT : GOT0880 
880 F0RX=20T01STEP-1 : POKES+1 , X : NEXT: POKE 
S+4 , 32 : P0KES+4 ,129: F0RX= 1T0500 : N EXT 
885 POKES+4, 128: POKES+4, 33: RETURN 
890 U=INT(50*RND(1))+16:V=INT(10*RND(1) 
}+l : V1=D3+V: V2=D3-V : RETURN 

895 FORT=1T02000:NEXT 

900 PRINT" [ HOME] [ 1 1" [DOWN]"] [ RED j"RX$"EN 

GINE" : PRINTRX$"FAILURE" : POKES+18, 33 

905 FORX=1T02000: NEXT: POKES+4 ,33: RETURN CG 

910 IFHE>V10RHE<V2THENDG=0:PRINTCL$"[RVS 

ON ] [ WHITE ] [ 3" " ] [ RVSOFF ] " : RETURN 

915 I FD8< 1 20-ASTI IENR ETURN 

920 PRINTDN$" [ 5" [ DOWN ] " ] "RX$"C0LEIS ION ! " 

:GOSUB845:GOT0820 

925 DATA169, 1,141, 25, 208, 162, 69, 160, 11,1 

73,18,208,48,4,162,255,160,2,142,18 

930 DATA208, 140, 32, 208, 173, 13, 220, 41, 1,2 

40,3,76,49,234,76,188,254 

935 G0SUB1030:D0=1 

940 POKEKJ, I :POKEKB, ASC{"+") :GQSUB175: IF 

GS<65THEN940 

950 POKEKJ,l:POKEKB,ASC( n U"):GOSUB175:IF 

EL<29THEN950 

955 POKEKJ, l:POKEKB,ASC("L"):GOSUB175:GO 

SUB4 50 ; GOSUB4 50 : GOSUB450 



■965 POKEKJ, X: POKEKB, A5G("D"):G0SUB175: IF 

EL>4THEN965 AF 

•970 D5=0:PX=0 CB 

•975 GOSUB175 CP 

•980 IFAS<60THENP0KEKJ,1: POK EKB,ASC ("+"): 

GOSUB175:GOT09SO KO 

•985 IFDG=1THENRN=INT(10*RSD( 1 ) ) : RU=RU+RN 

:G0SUB450:RU=RU-RN MJ 

•990 CFD5=100THENPX=1: POKEKJ, 1: POK EKB.ASC 

("D") :G0SUB175: IFELC-6THEN990 PF 
ME -995 IFEL>6 THEN EL=EL-1:GOSUB450:GCT0995 IA 



■ 1000 D5=D5+1 : IFPX=0THEN975 

■ 1002 GOSUB175: IFAS<40THENP0KEKJ , 1 : POKEKB 
,ASC("+"):GOSUB175:GOTO1002 

■1003 IFAT>200THKN1002 

1005 P0KEKJ,1:P0KEKB,ASC( M U"):G0SUB175:I 
FEK-2THEN1005 



CE 

MD 

NO 

AC 



1007 POKEKJ, 1: POKEKB, ASC("l"):GOSUB175 KE 



1010 POKEKJ, 1: POKEKB, ASC("R") 
1015 GOSUB175:IFGD<>ITUEN1015 
OL -1020 G0SUB1 75: POKEKJ, 1: POKEKB ',ASC("-").s I 
FGS>0THENi02Q 

1025 RUaO:GOSUBl035: PRINTRX$" [ UP ] [ UP ] [ 4" 

"J":DO=0:EUO:GOT0175 
1030 PRtNTUN$"[4"[D0WN]"]"RX$"DEM0":PRIN 
TRX$ "FLIGHT": RETURN 

ik- -1035 PRINTDN$"[5"[DOWN]"J ,, RX$"[6" "]":RE 
JL TURN 

<N -1200 IFA$>"4"TUEN1400 

JE -1202 IFA$= M r , THENIUl-],l:G0SUBn00:G0SUB 
1220: RETURN 

1205 IFA$="2"THENI2=1-I2:GQSUB1230:RETUR 



MD 



[■:o 

UK 

EJ 



OB 



.11, 
MF N 

•1210 IFA$="3"THENI3=1-I3:G0SUB1240:RETUR 

JE N 

12 17 [ F A $ = " 4 "T i 1 E NC< )S U B 1 3 50 ; COS U B 1 2 60 : R ET 
URN 

NA -1220 IFIl=lTHENPRINTIl$"[RED][s Z] [WHITE 
]": RETURN 
•1225 PR INTI1$"[ WHITE ][s Z]": IFGD=1THEN82 

■1227 RETURN 

•1230 IFI2=lTHENPRINTI2$"[RED][s Z] [WHITE 
J": RETURN 

•1235 PRINTI2$"[WH.[TK][s Z]": RETURN 
•1240 IFI3=lTHENPRINTI3$"[REI)][s Z] [WHITE 
]":C0SUB1310: RETURN 

•1250 PRINTI3$"[ WHITE] [s Z]":G0SUB1330: RE 
CB TURN 

1260 I|-T4 = l THENPRINTI4$" [GREEN ][s Z]":RE 
TURN 

•1270 PRINT I4$"[ RED] [s Z]": RETURN 
GP -1300 POKES+11,33:POKES+8,4:FORU=1T02000: 
NEXT: POKES+1 1,32 



GP 
LE 

NA 

NH 

CF 



LP 



HJ -1305 P0KES+7,F3:P0KES+8,F4: POKES+1 1, 17 :R 
960 POKEKJ, l:POKEKB,ASC("l"):GOSUB175 FB ETURN 

136 AHOY! 



LN 
HO 

OM 

AO 

JD 

NN 
JC 

DP 

NB 

NH 

HI! 

MD 

PB 
IM 

CL 

CM 

PG 

LM 

OM 
DH 

EH 

NG 



• 1310 Fl=Fl-40: ER=ER+80*( ER>0) : IFFKOTHEN 
Fl=255: F2=F2-1 :IFF2<OTHENF2=0 CB 

•1320 POKES, F1:P0KES+1,F2: RETURN OF 
■1330 F1=F1+40:ER=ER+80:IFF1>255THENF1=0: 

F2-F2+1 LK 

•1335 GOT01320 FL 

•1350 PRINTFL$(I4)" ": 14=14+1 :IFI4=3THENI 

4=1 AG 

•1355 PRINTFL$(I4)"[WHITE][BACKARR0W]":RE 

TURN KI 

■1400 IFA$="5"THFNI5=1-I5 HB 

■1402 EFA$-"6"THBHI'6-1-I6 GO 

•1404 IFA$= ,, 7"THENI7=1-I7 ED 

•1406 IF 15=1 THEN PR1NTDN$RX$ M [UP] [UP][L 

EFT][LEFF][RED][c D]":G0T01410 EN 
•1408 PRINTDN$RX$"[ LEFT] [LEFT] [WHITE] [UP] 

[UP][c D]" GK 

•1410 IFI6=lTHENPRINTDN?RX$"[LEFr][LEFT][ 

UP][RED][c D]":GOT01414 BO 

• 141 2 PRINTDN$RX$"[ LEFT ] [ LEFT ] [ UP ] [WHITE ] 

[c DJ" OA 

•1414 IFI7=1THEN PRINTDN$RX$"[LEFT][LEFT] 

[RED][c D][ WHITE]": RETURN PD 

•1416 PR INTDN$RX$" [WHITE] [LEFT ][ LEFT ][c D 

J": RETURN . 00 

MEMORY CHECK 

FROM PACE 46 

•10 REM *** COMMODORE 64 MEMORY CHECK *** NP 
•20 PRINT" [CLEAR] LOADING AND VERIFYING DA 
TA[3"."]" DB 

• 30 FORJ=49152T049268 : READ A :POKEJ , A: X=X+A 

: NEXT J FP 

•40 [FXOl4524THENPRINT"[ DOWN] ERROR IN DA 

TA[3"."J":END IN 

■50 PRINT" [DOWN ] DATA IS OK [3"."]" AH 

•60 PRINT" [ DOWN ]SYS49152 TO BEGIN MEMORY 

CHECK[3 n ."]":NEW I.I 

• 70 DATA32 , 68 , 229 , 169 , , 168 , 153 , 40 , 216 , 20 
0,192,120 EM 

•80 DATA144, 248, 133,251, 162, 8, 134, 252, 170 
,168,169,48 AE 

•90 DATA14 I, 57, 4, 141, 59, 4, 169, 50, 141, 58, 4 
,169 AL 

■ 100 DATA52 , 14 1 , 60 , 4 , 169 1 56 , 14 1 , 6 1 , 4 , 140, 
139,4 BC 

• 1 10 DATA 152,129, 251 ,193,251, 208 , 50 , 200 , 1 
92,0,208,241 EG 

• 120 DATA230 ,251,165,251, 208 ,8,165,252, 20 
1,159,176,39 EN 

•130 DATA230, 252, 160,22, 185,39,4,201, 57,1 
76,13,170 U 

•140 DATA232, 138, 153, 39, 4, 162, 0,160, 0,76, 
45,192 JO 

■150 DATA169.48, 153,39,4, 136,76,76,192,16 
9,2,141 AL 



•160 DATA32, 208, 96, 169, 5, 14 1,32, 208, 96 XC 

THE HAUNTED CASTLE 

FROM PACE 60 

•0 DIMM,U,D$(3,1),W$(3),W(3),TR(10,1),S(1 
0,l),S$(l):F0RA=0TO3:READD$(A,O):NEXT LO 

•1 DEFFNR(X)=INT(RND(1)*X):SD=2040:DR=685 
:S=53248:SO=54272:POKESO+24,15 FH 

■2 POKES+39,9:POKES+16,0:DATA"[HOME][4"[D 
OWN ] " ] [ 1 7" [ R IGHT ]"]"," [ HOME ] [ 1 3" [ DOWN ] " ] 
[LEFT]" NH 

•3 POKESD,245:DATA"[HOME][24"[DOWN]"][17" 
[ RIGHT ]"]","[ HOME ] [ 1 2" [ DOWN ] " ] " KI 

■4 POKES, 171 :W$(0)=D$(0,0)+"[RVSON][c 4][ 
6" "J":W$(l)=D$(l,0)+"[RVSON][c 4] [DOWN 
][LEFT] [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN] 
[LEFT] ":A=RND(-TI) HM 

•5 P0XES+l,158:WS(2)=D$(2,0)+ ,, [RVS0N][c 4 
][6" "][HOME]":W$(3)=D$(3,0)+"[RVS0N][c 
4] [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN][LEFT 
j [DOWN] [LEFT] " DC 

•6 P0KES+27,l:D$(0,l)=D$(0,0)+"[6" "]":D$ 
( 1 , 1 ) =D$ ( 1 , ) +" [ DOWN ] [ LEFT ] [ DOWN ] [ LEFT 
] [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN] [LEFT] " CE 

•7 POKES+28,l:D$(2,l)=D$(2,0)+"[6" "][HOM 
E]":D$(3,1)=D$(3,0)+" [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN 
][LEFT] [DOWN] [LEFT] [DOWN] [LEFT] " PG 

•8 D$(l,0)=D$(l,0)+"[c 2][RVS0N][s -][DOW 
N][LBFT][s -][DOWN][LEFT][s -][DOWN][LEF 
T][s -][D0WN][LEFT][s W]":D$(3,0)=D$(3,0 
)+"[c 2][RVS0N][s W][DOWN][LEFT][s -][D0 
WN][LEFT][s -] [DOWN ][ LEFT] [s -][DQWN][LE 
FT][s -] ME 

•9 D$(2,0)=D$(2,0)+"[c 2][RVS0N][s W][5"[ 
s *]"][HOME] M :D$(0,0)=D$(0,0)+"[c 2][RVS 
0N][5"[s *]"][s W]":POKES+38,7 AC 

•10 PRINT"[CI,RAR] [3" [ DOWN ]"][7"[ RIGHT]"]? 
LEASE WAIT, READING DATA.": COS UB96:GOSUB 
66:G0T086 GF 

•11 PRINT"[CLEAR][4"[D0WN]"][c 4][RVS0N][ 
17" "][6"[ RIGHT]"] [17" "]" ; ;G0SUB157:U=6 
84 FJ 

■12 PRT.NT"[4"[D0WN]"J":G0SUB157:PRINT"[17 
" "][6"[RIGHT] ,, ][16" "][HOME] BC 

• 13 P0KE2023, 160:P0KE56295, 11 :F0RA-679T06 
95:P0KEA,0:NEXT:P0KEDR,2:POKE687,l KF 

•14 SL=49176:SR=49196:XR=7S1:M=49750:P=49 
496:P0KES+21,1 NL 

■ 1 5 G0SUB44 : G0SUB39 : POKES+30 , : P0KES+31 , 
:G0SUB80:G0SUB81:G0T079 DK 

•16 SYSM:0NPEEK(U)+1G0T016,17,19,21,23,25 
,32 AM 

■17 Y=Y-1:FORA=OT07:POKES+1,PEEK(S+1)-1:S 
YSP : NEXT : POKES+I , 255 : G0SUB44 NA 

•18 FORA=OT035:POKES+1,PEEK(S+1)-1:SYSP;N 
EXT:GOSUB39:GOT079 FC 



AHOY! 137 



19 X=X+1:F0RA=0T07:P0KEXR,0;SYSSR:SYSP:N 
EXT: POKES ,0:P0KES+16,0:G0SUB44 LL 

20 FORA=OT035:POKEXR,0:SYSSR:SYSP:NEXT:G 
0SUB39:GOTO79 NE 

21 Y=Y+1:F0RA=0T024: POKES+l, PEEK(S+1)+1: 

S Y SP : NEXT :G0SUB44: POKES+l, 89 LG 

22 FOR A=0T01 2: POKES+l, PEEK (S+1)+1:SYSP:N 
EXT:GOSUB39:GOT079 GO 

23 X=X-l:F0RA=0TQ7:POKEXR,0:SYSSL:SYSP:N 
EXT :P0KES+ 16,1: POKES, 82 :GOSUB44 LG 

24 F0RA=0T033:P0KEXR,0:SYSSL:SYSP:NEXT:G 
0SUB39:G0T079 FA 

25 0NSS+1G0T016.26.29 EP 

26 Z=Z+1:P0KESD, 250: POKED R,1:P0KE687,1:P 
OKES ,127: POKES+l ,119: F0RA=1T05 HF 

27 POKES, PEEK(S)-I6: POKES+l, PEEK (S+l)-8: 
F0RT=0T09 : NEXT: NEXT: POKES , : POKES+l , OB 

28 GOSUB54:SS=0:POKES,238:POKES+1,174:GO 
T015 KE 

29 POKESD , 245 : POKEDR , 2 : P0KE687 , 1 : Z=Z-1 : P 
OKES , 238 : POKES+ 1 , 1 74 : FOR A= 1T05 I B 

30 POKES+l, PEEK(S+1)+8:B=PEEK(S)+16:TFB= 
27OTHENB=15:P0KES+16,PEEK(S+16)0Rl JC 

31 POKES, B: NEXT : GOSUB54:SS=0: POKES, 1 27 :P 
OKES+l,119:P0KES+16,O:GOTO15 EF 

32 0NTR+1G0T016,33,36 CB 

33 TC=TC+1:GOSUB80:POKES+30,0:TR(Z,0)=10 
:TR(Z, l)=10:G0SUB84:GOSUB153:P0KESO+5,8 BP 

34 POKESO+6, 255 : P0KES0+4, 23:C=3. 5+TC:G0S 
UB154:P0KES+21,1:P0KES0+6,15 GH 

35 P0KES+30,0:G0TO16 II 

36 0N-(TC=0)G0T090:TC S TC-1 : P0KES+21 , 1 :P0 
KE689,0:A=FNR(10):B=FNR(10) KK 

37 C=FNR(11):IFTR(C,0)<>10THEN37 BD 

38 TR(C,G)=A:TR(C,l)=B:P0KES+3O,0:GOSUB8 
0:G0TO16 FL 

39 P0KES+31,0:C=FNR(3):FORA=0TQC OD 

40 B=FNR(4):0NPEEK<680+B)+1G0T040 JK 

41 P0KE680+B,0:CL=CL+1:IFCL=3THENA=C PM 

42 NEXT:F0RA=0T03:IFWCA)=1THENW(A)=0:NEX 

T: RETURN JH 

43 PRINTD$( A, PEEK(680+A)): NEXT: RETURN PC ' 

44 P0KES+21 , 1 : CL=0 : F0RA=0T03 : P0KE680+A , 1 
:NEXT:IFX=0THENP0KE683,0:W(3)=1:CL=CL+1 MI 

45 IFX=9THENP0KE681, 0:W(1)=1 :CL=CL+1 FM 

46 IFY=0THENPOKE680,0:W(0)=l:CL=CL+l LC 

47 IFY=9THENPOKE682,0:W(2)=1:CL=CL+1 HH 

48 FORA=OT03:IFW(A)=1THENPRINTW$(A):GOTQ 
50 BB 

49 PRINTD$(A,1) PD 

50 NEXT:ON-(TC=3)GOSUB76:IFrR=lTHEWTR=0 KN 

51 IFTR(Z,0)=XANDTR(Z,1)=YTHEN61 HF 

52 IFTR=2THENTR=0:POKE689,0 PC 

53 IFSS=0THEN56 CI 

54 PRINT"[H0ME][5"[D0WN]"]"; :FORA=1T019: 
PRINT"[RIGHT][38" "] [RIGHT]"; HI 

55 NEXT:PRINT"[HOME]":SS=0 HC 

56 IFZ=OTHEN59 OL 

138 AHOYl 



•51 IFS(Z,0)=XANDS(Z,1)=YTHENPRINTS$(1)ST 
$:SS=2:GOT063 GE 

58 IFZ=10THEN63 BH 

59 IFS(Z+1,0)=XANDS(Z+1,1)=YTKENPRINTS$( 
0)ST$:SS=1 PO 

60 GOT063 PD 

61 POKES+40,5:POKESD+1,253:POKES+2 I 173:P 
0KES+3,150:PQKES+21,3:TR=1;P0KE689,0 HG 

62 GOT052 PB 

63 IFTR=10RFNR(100)>240R(X=OANDY=OANDZ=0 
)THENRETURN JI 

64 POKES+2,173:P0KES+3,150:P0KES+4O,l:P0 
KESD+1,251:P0KES+21,3:P0KE689,1:TR=2 LK 

65 RETURN IM 

66 ST$=" [ RVSON ] [ CYAN ] " : F0RA=1T06 : SB$=" [ D 
OWN ] " : F0RB=1T0A : ST$=ST$+" " :SB$=SB$+" [L 
EFT] [LEFT]": NEXT MI 

67 ST$=ST$+SB$:NEXT:S$(0)="[H0ME][5"[D0W 

N]"][RTGHT]":S$(l)-"t»0ME][18 ,, [D0WNJ"][R 
IGHT] GD 

68 S$(1)=S$(1)+" [12" [RIGHT]" ]":ST$=ST$+" 
[H0ME]":G0SUB75:F0RA=1T03:B=FNR(10) KM 

69 C=FNR(10):D=FNR(11):IFTR(D,0)=BANDTR( 
D,1)=CTHENA=A-1:NEXT DL 

70 TR(D,0)=B:TR(D,1)=C:NEXT:FORA=1T09:S( 
A,0)=FNR( 10) : S(A, 1 )=FNR( 10) KK 

71 IFS(A,0)=TR(A,0)ANDS(A,1)=TR(A,1)THEN 
A=A-1:NEXT LN 

72 IFS(A,0)=TR(A+1,0)ANDS(A,1)=TRCA+1,1) 
THENA=A-1:NEXT GN 

73 IFS(A,0)=S(A-l,0)ANDS(A,l)=S(A-l,l)Tlt 
ENA=A-1:NEXT IK 

74 NEXT: RETURN EJ 

75 F0RA=0T010:TR(A,0)=10:TR(A,L)=10:NEXT 

: RETURN NM 

76 IFXOOORYOOORZOOTHENRETURN AB 

77 POKES+21 ,0: PRINT" [ HOME] [ 7" [ DOWN ] " ] [CY 
AN ] "SPC( 1 2 ) "CONGRATULATIONS ! G J 

78 PRINT" [DOWN] [c 1] [3" [RIGHT]"] YOU HAVE 
FOUND ALL THE TREASURES! ":GOT093 DJ 

79 PRINT"[HOME][DOWN][c 6] [10" [RIGHT]" ]R 
COM #"STR$(Y)MID$(STR$(X),2,1)" LEVEL"Z 
"[LEFT] ":G0T016 OD 

80 PRINT" [HOME] [PURPLE] [ 13" [ RIGHT]" JTREA 
SURES;"TC: RETURN I IN 

81 US$="N0NE":IFZ<10TnENUS$='T'+STR$(S(Z 
+1,1))+MID$(STR$(S(Z+1,0)),2,1) CD 

82 DS$="NONE" : IFZ>OTHENDS$="#"+STR$(S(Z, 
1))+MID$(STR$(S(Z,0)),2,1) BH 

83 PRINT" [ HOME ] [ 3" [ DOWN ] " ] [ 7" [ RIGHT] " ] [ c 
3]STAIRS: UP-"US$" DOWN-"DS$ PG 

84.TR$="[RED]NONE":IFTR(Z,0)<>10TUENTR$= 
"[GREEN ]#"+STR$CTR(Z,l))+MID$(STR$(TR(Z, 
0)),2,1) GM 

85 PRINT" [ HOME ] [ DOWN ] [ DOWN ] [ BLUE ] [8" [ RIG 
HT]"]TREASURE LOCATION: "TR$: RETURN HA 

86 P0KES+32,0:P0KES+33,0: PRINT" [CLEAR] [4 
"[ DOWN ]"][ PURPLE ]"SPC(11)"THE HAUNTED CA 






STLE EJ 

87 PRINT"[3"[D0WN]"][c 6] [4" "]PRESS THE 
[RED]FIRE[c 6] BUTTON WHEN READY [HOME]" 

CHR$(142)CHR$(8) OB 

88 IF(PEEK(56320)AND16)=16THEN88 OC 

89 GOTOll PG 

90 G0SUB1 53 : POKESO+5 , 8 : POKESO+6 , 255 : POKE 
SO+4,23:POKESO+I5,9:FORA=lT025 JA 

91 P0KES+39,FNR(16):P0KES+38,FNR(16):G0S 
UB1 56 : NEXT : POKESO+6 , 15 : P0KES+21 , LE 

92 PRINT"[I10ME][7"[ DOWN ] '^"SPCCll) 1 '[CYAN 
]THE GHOST GOT YOU! [DOWN] KJ 

93 PRINTSPC(9)"[ DOWN ] [DOWN ] [ YELLOW]PUSH 
UP TO PLAY AGAIN" :PRINTSPC( 11)" [D0WN]PUS 

H DOWN TO STOP PO 

94 A=PEEK(56320):IFA=126THENRUN * HP 

95 ON(A=125)+1GOT094:SYS2048 MH 

96 IFPEEK( 49759 )=96THENRETURN PA 

97 FORA=15680T016255:READB:POKEA,B:NEXT: 
F0RA=49152T049759i READB: POKEA , B: NEXT DA 

98 RETURN IM 

99 DATAO,,,,,,, 252,, 3, 51,, 15,255, 192, ,16 
8,, ,168,,, 168,,, 252,, 3 MB 

100 DATA255,,3,255,192,15,255,224,47,255 
,32, 32,,, 3, 255,, 3, 207,, 15, 3, 192, 60 BA 

101 DATA3, 192,42,2, 160, , , , , , ,144, ,,,,,,, 
252, ,3,51, ,15,255,192, AH 

102 DATA168, , ,168, , ,168, , ,252, ,3,255, ,3, 
255, ,3, 255,, 3, 239,,, 32,, 3 NL 

103 DATA255,,3,207,,3,207,,3,207,,2,170, 

104 DATA252 , , 3 , 51 , , 1 5 , 255 , 192 1 , 168, , , 168 

,,,168, ,,252, ,3, 255, ,3, 255, AK 

105 DATA11, 255,, 11, 255, 128,, ,128,3,255,, 

3, 207,,, 252,, AD 

106 DATA252,,, 170,, ,,,,,, 144,,,,,,,, 63,, 

,204,192,3,255,240 BO 

107 DATAO, 42,,, 42,,, 42,,, 63,,, 255, 192,, 2 
55, 192,, 255, 224, 2, 255, 224, 2 PL 

108 DATAO,,, 255, 192,, 243, 192,, 63,,, 63,,, 
170,,,,,,,, 144,,,, BI 

109 DATAO,,, 63,,, 204, 192, 3, 255, 240,, 42,, 
,42, ,, 42,,, 63,,, 255, 192 EB 

110 DATAO, 255, 192,, 255, 192,, 251, 192,, 8,, 
,255, 192, ,243, 192, ,243, 192, NK 

1 1 1 DATA243, 192 . 2 , 170, 128 144 

,,,63, ,,204,192,3,255 IE 

112 DATA240,,42,,,42,,,42,,,63,,,255,192 
,3,255,192,11,255,240,8,255 JA 

113 DATA248,,,8,,255,192,,243,192,3,192, 
240,3,192,60,10,128,168,,,,, IL 

114 DATAO, 144,, 48,,, 120,,, 252,, 1, 182,, 1, 
254,, 3,255,, 3,255,128, 7, 255 AD 

115 DATA192, 7,255, 192, 15, 255, 224, 15, 255, 
224,7,255,224,7,255,192,3,255,128,3 EK 

116 DATA255,, 7,252,, 15, 224,, 62, ,,,,,,,,, 
,,,,12,,, 30,,, 63 AE 

117 DATAO,, 109, 128,, 127, 192,, 255, 192, 1,2 



55,224,1,255,240,3,255,240,3,255 CK 

118 DATA240.3, 255, 248,3,255,248, 1,255,24 
8,, 255,240,, 63, 248,, 15, 252,,, 254 EL 

119 DATAO ,, 31 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 7 , 128 ,, 31 
,192, ,127,224,1 u 

120 DATA255, 240, 7, 255, 240, 9, 255, 192,14,2 
55,48,22,252,240,27,115,240,29,79,240 BM 

121 DATA30, 63, 240, 31, 127, 240, 31, 127, 224, 

31 , 127 , 192 , 15 , 127 , , 7 , 1 24 , , 3 , I 12 , , 1 MI 

122 DATA64,,,,, NA 

123 DATA1, 254, 2, 253, 4, 251, 8, 247, 16, 239, 3 

2.223.64.191.128.127.222.1.208.96.254 NE 

124 DATA 1,208, 96 ,189,, 208 ,201,, 208, 9, 173 
,16,208,61,1,192,141,16,208,222, MA 

125 DATA208,96,189,,208,201,255,208,9,17 

3, 16, 208, 29,, 192, 141, 16, 208, 254, LF 

126 DATA208, 96, 162, ,142,172,2,142,176,2, 
173,31,208,9,254,201,255,208,6,169,5 KA 

127 DATA141,172,2,96,173,30,208,9,254,20 
1,255,208,6,169,6,141,172,2,96,173, IC 

128 DATA220,41, 15,201, 14,240,21,201, 13,2 
40,53,201,11,240,85,201,7,240,6,169,1 BH 

129 DATA141, 176, 2, 96, 76, 18, 193, 173, 1,208 
,201, 88, 240, 4, 32, 16, 192, 96, 173,, 208 KF 

130 DATA201, 155, 144, 234, 201, 190, 144, 1,96 
,173,168,2,201,1,208,222,169,1,141 ED 

131 DATA172, 2, 96, 173, 1,208,201,223,240,4 
,32, 20, 192, 96, 173,, 208, 201, 155, 144 LN 

132 DATA198, 201, 190, 144, 1,96, 173, 170, 2, 2 
01,1,208,186,169,3,141,172,2,96,173, ME 

133 DATA208,201,29,240,29, 173, 173,2, 201, 
2,240,9,169,1,141,173,2,32,24,192,96 KC 

134 DATA169, 250, 141, 248, 7, 169, 1,141, 175, 

2.76.218.192.173.16.208.9.254.201.255 DG 

135 DATA240, 21 8, 173, 1,208, 201, 145, 144, 87 
,201,168,144,1,96,173,171,2,201,1,208 BG 

136 DATA75, 169, 4, 141, 172, 2, 96, 173,, 208, 2 
01,59,240,29,173,173,2,201,1,240,9 MJ 

137 DATA169,2,141,173,2,32,44,192,96,169 
,245,141,248,7,169,1,141,175,2,76,32 NE 

138 DATA193, 173, 16,208,9,254,201,255,208 
,218,173,1,208,201,145,144,17,201,168 DI 

139 DATA144, 1,96, 173, 169, 2, 201, 1,208, 5,1 
69,2,141,172,2,96,173,176,2,208,29 I A 

140 DATA238,174,2,173,174,2,201,5,208,19 
,169, ,141, 174, 2, 173, 173, 2, 201, 1,240 OA 

141 DATA10, 201, 2, 240, 56, 76, 222, 193,76,22 
2,193,173,175,2,201,1,240,7,201,2,240 EA 

142 DATA21, 76, 222, 193, 169, 1,141, 175, 2, 17 
3,248,7,201,248,240,6,206,248,7,76 PO 

143 DATA222, 193, 169, 2, 141, 175, 2, 173,248, 
7,201,250,240,226,238,248,7,76,222 NH 

144 DATA193 , 173 , 175, 2, 201 , 1 , 240, 7 , 201 ,2, 
240,21,76,222,193,169,1,141,175,2,173 JG 

145 DATA248,7,201,247,240,6,238,248,7,76 
,222,193,169,2,141,175,2,173,248,7 BM 

146 DATA201 , 245 , 240 , 226 , 206 , 248 , 7 , 169 , , 1 
41,31,208,141,30,208,96,173,177,2 EE 

AHOY! 139 



I M PORTA MTI Lelters on wni,e background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter them! Pages 113 and 116 explain ihese codes 
II VI rUrl I Mil I l and provide other essential information on entering Ahoy! programs. Refer to these pages before entering any programs! 



•147 DATA201, 1,208, 103, 238, 178, 2, 173, 178, 

2, 201, 2, 208, 93, 169,, 141, 178, 2, 173, 16 BI 

•148 DATA208,9,254,201,255,208,9 t 173,16,2 

08,9,253,201,255,208,39,173,16,208,9 K0 
•149 DATA254,201, 255,240,9, 173, 16,208,9,2 

53, 201, 255, 240, 8, 173, 2, 208, 205,, 208 LF 
•150 DATA144, 13, 162,2,32,24,192,169,252,1 

41,249,7,76,64,194,162,2,32,44,192 CN 
-151 DATA169,251, 141,249,7, 173,3,208,205, 

1,208,176,8,162,2,32,20,192,76,85,194 BL 
•152 DATA162,2,32,16,192,96,32,231,193,32 

,64,192,32,88,193,96 NH 

•153 FOR A=SOTOSO+ 23 :P0KEA,0: NEXT: RETURN I A 
•154 POKESO+15,C:FORB=1T0160STEP2:FORT=OT 

029:NEXT:P0KESO+l,B:POKES+40,FNR(16) DJ 
•155 NEXT:RETURN EJ 

•156 POKESO+l,FNR(256):P0KESO,FNR(200):RE 

TURN LB 

•157 F0RA=1T07: PRINT" [RVS0N] "SPC(38)" "j 

:NEXT: RETURN AD 



KNOCKOUT 

FROM PAGE 70 

Beginning address in Hex; CO 00 
Ending address in Hex: C61A 
SYS to start; 49152 



CO 00 
COO 8 
CO 10 
CO 18 
CO 20 
CO 2 8 
CO 30 
C038 
C040 
C048 
CO 50 
CO 58 
C060 
C068 
CO 70 
CO 7 8 
CO 80 
C088 
C090 
C098 
COAO 
CO A 8 
CO BO 
COB 8 
COCO 



A9 
10 
00 
OF 
90 
C4 
DO 
FF 
FF 
FB 
FD 
OF 
91 
69 
85 
FD 
EO 
E6 
CE 
E7 
DO 
A9 
1A 
IB 
03 



00 
FA 
3D 
C5 
OB 
8D 
ED 
A8 
A8 
A9 
A9 
C5 
FD 
03 
FC 
A5 
15 
FC 
OF 
C4 
F5 
7F 
DO 
8D 
A9 



AO 3F 99 
AO 00 B9 
C8 DO F7 
B9 00 3D 
48 AD OF 
OF C5 68 
AD OF C5 
68 99 FF 
C8 DO DO 
3D 85 FC 
3F 85 FE 
A 2 00 AO 
88 10 F9 
85 FB A5 
38 A5 FD 
FE E9 00 
DO D8 E6 
C6 FD DO 
C5 DO C5 
99 00 D4 
A9 01 8D 
8D OD DC 
A9 EB 8D 
11 DO A9 
C3 8D 15 



CO 

IB 

A2 

FO 

C5 

B8 

48 

3D 

A 9 

A9 

A9 

02 

18 

FC 

E9 

85 

FB 

02 

AO 

C8 

1A 

A9 

12 

Fl 

03 



3C 
C5 
00 
16 
ID 
EO 
98 
98 
80 
FC 
04 
Bl 
A5 
69 
03 
FE 
DO 
C6 
00 
CO 
C5 
01 
DO 
8D 
58 



88 A8 
99 E7 
8E 10 
OA F4 
99 3D 
08 89 
49 98 
49 02 
85 03 
85 D9 
8D F6 
FB 20 
FB 3C 
00 62 
85 41 
E8 7 2 
02 D5 
FE C9 
B9 25 
19 56 
73 F7 
8D 81 
A9 4B 
14 80 
A9 D8 



C0C8 
CO DO 
CODS 
COEO 
C0E8 
COFO 
C0F8 
CI 00 
CI 08 
CUO 
C118 
CI 20 
C128 
CI 30 
C138 
C140 
C148 
CI 50 
C158 
CI 60 
C168 
C170 
C178 
CI 80 
C188 
CI 90 
C198 
C1A0 
C1A8 
CI BO 
C1B8 
CI CO 
C1C8 
CI DO 
C1D8 
C1E0 
C1E8 
C1F0 
C1F8 
C200 
C208 
C210 
C218 
C220 
C2 28 
C230 
C238 
C240 
C248 
C250 
C258 
C2 60 
C268 
C270 
C278 



OB 

00 

20 

C5 

IE 

C4 

A9 

FD 

E7 

91 

40 

7 

A9 

AO 

18 

FE 

A9 

8D 

AO 

A9 

C9 

99 

8D 

99 

99 

8D 

04 

17 

20 

DO 

DE 

EO 

FO 

4A 

BD 

BD 

44 

00 

C4 

03 

IE 

IE 

EE 

FO 

10 

99 

C5 

10 

90 

14 

13 

68 

OB 

68 

09 



8D 

8D 

IE 

FO 

AB 

8D 

93 

A9 

A9 

FD 

AO 

88 

04 

00 

A5 

69 

AO 

75 

03 

3A 

C4 

07 

28 

08 

OB 

27 

EO 

DO 

D9 

A2 

OD 

CI 

OE 

A8 

00 

00 

90 

C5 

C9 

9D 

DO 

DO 

12 

03 

C5 

13 

88 

C5 

OD 

C5 

C5 

AE 

09 

4C 

08 



20 
15 
AB 
15 
20 
05 
20 
DB 
07 
C6 
1C 
DO 
85 
91 
FD 
00 
8D 
07 
99 
3D 
99 
C5 
DO 
DC 
C5 
DO 
20 
8D 
C3 
01 
C5 
8A 
AD 
B9 
DC 
C5 
07 
BD 
47 
02 
FO 
4C 
C5 
4C 
29 
C5 
10 
AE 
OD 
A8 
48 
00 
08 
7C 
A8 



DO 8D 
DO A 9 
20 E3 
A9 74 
E3 C3 
C5 OA 
D2 FF 
85 FE 
91 FD 
FE CA 
99 55 
F7 A9 
FE A2 
FD AO 
69 28 
85 FE 
5 5 04 
8D 92 
3A D8 
3B 04 
00 C5 
88 10 
8D 2A 
88 10 
88 10 
8D 29 
FO F9 
ID DO 
20 AE 
BD OD 
BD OB 
FO 13 
10 C5 
DB C4 
29 OF 
18 79 
C9 FD 

02 C5 
90 07 
C5 CA 
09 20 
18 C2 
AD 12 
E9 C2 

03 A A 
BD E3 
EB AC 
02 C5 
15 C5 
68 4C 
98 OD 
C5 EC 
48 98 
C2 29 
68 8D 



21 

61 

C3 

AO 

AA 

8D 

A9 

A2 

88 

DO 

04 

7D 

13 

ID 

85 

CA 

8D 

07 

88 

AO 

B9 

Fl 

DO 

FA 

FA 

DO 

A9 

8D 

C3 

C5 

C5 

AD 

29 

A 8 

49 

B3 

BO 

18 

C9 

10 

3A 

8D 

C5 

AO 

BD 

C4 

11 

EC 

48 

61 

16 

01 

29 

F7 

10 



DO 

AO 

8D 

C4 

BD 

06 

00 

04 

DO 

F4 

99 

85 

A9 

91 

FD 

DO 

72 

A9 

10 

03 

CD 

A9 

AO 

AO 

A 9 

AE 

OF 

15 

AD 

FO 

A8 

04 

OC 

DO 

OF 

C4 

03 

79 

BC 

AC 

C3 

17 

29 

01 

DF 

99 

C5 

03 

98 

C2 

C5 

C5 

F7 

48 

C5 



A9 

C4 

04 

20 

Al 

C5 

85 

AO 

FB 

A 9 

75 

FD 

5D 

FD 

A 5 

E6 

04 

00 

FA 

B9 

C4 

00 

02 

OF 

01 

3C 

8D 

DO 

IE 

OA 

4C 

C5 

4A 

08 

A8 

C9 

9D 

BE 

BO 

AD 

AD 

C5 

3 

B9 

C4 

15 

AD 

C5 

2D 

2D 

A8 

90 

A8 

98 

8C 



7B 

B4 

1C 

50 

84 

71 

58 

4F 

85 

9F 

17 

23 

17 

AD 

AE 

AF 

7D 

2B 

3C 

6E 

A2 

OB 

2A 

42 

31 

88 

CE 

77 

C4 

BO 

ED 

69 

CA 

9F 

AC 

38 

DD 

8C 

9D 

9D 

BC 

90 

90 

68 

37 

B7 

B3 

42 

DB 

D8 

A3 

81 

2F 

66 

8 A 



140 AHOY! 



C280 


: 11 


C5 


AO 


01 


B9 


10 


C5 


AA 


33 


C450 


: 30 


8D 


3D 


04 


AD 


OD 


DC 


29 


10 


C288 


: 98 


FO 


ID 


AD 


04 


C5 


FO 


18 


AF 


C458 


: 01 


FO 


03 


4C 


31 


EA 


4C 


BC 


BE 


C290 


; AD 


03 


C5 


38 


ED 


5 


C5 


CD 


C5 


C4 60 


: FE 


8E 


08 


93 


90 


50 


4C 


41 


F7 


C298 


2 


C5 


BO 


27 


18 


6D 


06 


C5 


89 


. C468 


: 59 


45 


52 


53 


3F 


20 


28 


31 


65 


C2A0 


: CD 


02 


C5 


90 


IE 


4C 


AF 


C2 


A3 


C4 70 


: 2F 


32 


29 


00 


93 


4C 


45 


56 


76 


C2A8 


B9 


00 


DC 


29 


10 


DO 


14 


8A 


E7 


C478 


: 4 5 


4C 


3F 


20 


28 


31 


2F 


32 


24 


C2B0 


: 29 


03 


18 


69 


01 


29 


03 


8D 


19 


C480 


: 29 


00 


50 


52 


45 


53 


53 


20 


58 


C2B8 


; OF 


C5 


8A 


29 


OC 


OD 


OF 


C5 


2F 


C488 


: 46 


37 


20 


46 


4F 


52 


20 


41 


6F 


C2C0 


4C 


C6 


C2 


8 A 


29 


OC 


29 


OF 


8E 


C490 


: 20 


52 


45 


4D 


41 


54 


43 


48 


B6 


C2C8 


. 99 


10 


C5 


AA 


BD 


A3 


C4 


99 


A2 


C498 


: 00 


01 


02 


04 


08 


10 


20 


40 


18 


C2D0 


07 


C5 


B9 


OD 


C5 


C9 


OA 


BO 


AE 


C4A0 


: SO 


12 


OE 


F5 


FF 


FE 


FF 


F5 


2C 


C2D8 


OD 


8A 


29 


08 


4A 


4A 


4A 


AA 


2B 


C4A8 


; F6 


F7 


F6 


FA 


F9 


F8 


F9 


FA 


71 


C2E0 


BD 


Dl 


C4 


99 


09 


C5 


88 


10 


36 


C4B0 


: FC 


FD 


FC 


00 


00 


00 


00 


FF 


A8 


C2E8 


9B 


A2 


OE 


AO 


E6 


88 


DO 


FD 


14 


C4B8 


: FF 


FF 


00 


01 


01 


01 


00 


FF 


BB 


C2F0 


CA 


10 


F8 


AD 


1A 


C5 


DO 


03 


26 


C4C0 


: 01 


00 


00 


FF 


01 


00 


00 


FF 


C2 


C2F8 


4C 


Bl 


CI 


A9 


00 


8D 


OB 


D4 


CF 


C4C8 


: 01 


46 


FA 


49 


B9 


F5 


FA 


F4 


F3 


C300 


20 


D9 


C3 


A2 


01 


BD 


10 


C5 


F4 


C4D0 


: FB 


F4 


FB 


04 


08 


OA 


1C 


06 


F5 


C308: 


29 


OC 


A8 


B9 


A3 


C4 


9D 


F8 


9E 


C4D8 


• 5 


OA 


09 


05 


06 


09 


OA 


FB 


OB 


C 3 1 


07 


98 


29 


08 


4 A 


4A 


4 A 


A 8 


68 


C4E0 


FF 


FF 


FF 


04 


00 


00 


00 


00 


E4 


C318* 


B9 


Dl 


C4 


9D 


FA 


7 


CA 


10 


E2 


C4E8 


8F 


00 


00 


00 


01 


OA 


00 


29 


AC 


C320 


E4 


A2 


17 


AO 


09 


18 


20 


FO 


91 


C4F0 


00 


00 


00 


22 


00 


00 


20 


00 


33 


C328 


FF 


A9 


82 


AO 


C4 


20 


IE 


AB 


A3 


C4F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OF 


08 


C330 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


88 


DO 


F9 


4C 


9E 


C500 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


C338 


CF 


CO 


8D 


OF 


C5 


AE 


17 


C5 


B6 


C508- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


08 


C340 


DO 


OC 


A2 


80 


8E 


OB 


D4 


E8 


97 


C510 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


10 


C348 


8E 


OB 


D4 


8E 


17 


C5 


AO 


01 


C3 


C518- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


18 


C3 50 


B9 


OD 


C5 


09 


06 


99 


OD 


C5 


58 


C520: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


20 


C358 


B9 


10 


C5 


29 


OC 


4A 


4A 


A A 


5C 


C528; 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


28 


C360 


i BD 


D7 


C4 


99 


OB 


C5 


88 


10 


BD 


C530; 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


10 


40 


C36S 


E7 


AD 


OF 


C5 


29 


OC 


FO 


68 


61 


C538: 


00 


00 


OC 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


54 


C3 70 


'A 2 


00 


AO 


01 


AD 


OF 


C5 


39 


70 


C540: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


40 


C378 


D3 


C4 


FO 


2E 


A9 


OF 


99 


OD 


8F 


C548; 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


48 


C380 


G5 


A9 


F3 


99 


09 


C5 


99 


FA 


EO 


C550: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


50 


C388 


07 


FE 


18 


C5 


BD 


18 


C5 


C9 


Dl 


C558: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


7C 


00 


00 


FE 


D3 


C390: 


64 


90 


17 


EE 


1A 


C5 


BD 


D5 


FE 


C560: 


00 


7F 


FE 


00 


7F 


FE 


00 


3C 


99 


C398' 


C4 


A8 


A9 


OB 


99 


00 


04 


A9 


02 


C568: 


F8 


00 


IE 


7C 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


OB 


C3A0: 


OF 


C8 


99 


00 


04 


68 


68 


4C 


33 


C570; 


OF 


00 


00 


IF 


EO 


00 


3F 


EO 


9F 


C3A8: 


FB 


C2 


E8 


88 


10 


C6 


A2 


00 


52 


C578: 


00 


3F 


FO 


00 


3F 


EO 


00 


IF 


E7 


C3B0: 


AO 


OA 


18 


2 


FO 


FF 


A9 


01 


2F 


C580: 


EO 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


7F 


C3B8: 


8D 


86 


02 


AE 


18 


C5 


A9 


00 


05 


C588: 


IE 


7C 


00 


3C 


F8 


00 


7F 


FE 


D6 


C3C0: 


20 


CD 


BD 


A2 


00 


AO 


1C 


18 


E3 


C590: 


00 


7F 


FE 


00 


00 


FE 


00 


00 


OE 


C3C8: 


20 


FO 


FF 


A 9 


00 


8D 


86 


02 


99 


C598: 


7C 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


18 


C3D0; 


AE 


19 


C5 


A9 


00 


20 


CD 


BD 


B3 


C5A0: 


EO 


00 


07 


FO 


01 


FF 


FO 


03 


6E 


C3D8: 


60 


AO 


15 


8C 


04 


D4 


88 


8C 


69 


C5A8: 


FF 


FO 


07 


87 


CO 


OF 


03 


EO 


DB 


C3E0: 


04 


D4 


60 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


31 


1A 


C5B0: 


OF 


00 


00 


IF 


EO 


00 


3F 


EO 


DF 


C3E8: 


FO 


04 


C9 


32 


DO 


F5 


29 


01 


CA 


C5B8: 


00 


3F 


FO 


00 


3F 


EO 


00 


IF 


28 


C3F0: 


60 


A9 


01 


8D 


19 


DO 


AD 


1A 


3B 


C5C0: 


EO 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


BF 


C3F8: 


C5 


DO 


59 


AD 


00 


C5 


8D 


00 


E9 


C5C8: 


IE 


7C 


00 


3C 


F8 


00 


7F 


FE 


17 


C400; 


DO 


8D 


04 


DO 


AD 


02 


C5 


8D 


36 


C5D0; 


00 


7F 


FE 


00 


00 


FE 


00 


00 


4E 


C408: 


01 


DO 


8D 


5 


DO 


AD 


01 


C5 


Bl 


C5D8: 


7C 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


55 


C410: 


8D 


02 


DO 


8D 


06 


DO 


AD 


03 


8 5 


C5E0: 


00 


00 


00 


3E 


00 


00 


7F 


00 


9E 


C418: 


C5 


8D 


03 


DO 


8D 


07 


DO 


AO 


45 


C5E8: 


3F 


FF 


00 


FF 


FF 


03 


EO 


7C 


88 


C4 20; 


03 


B9 


7 


C5 


99 


F8 


07 


88 


CB 


C5F0: 


7 


CO 


3E 


IF 


EO 


00 


3F 


EO 


17 


C428: 


10 


F7 


AD 


OA 


DC 


FO 


OH 


C9 


8D 


C5F8: 


00 


3F 


FO 


00 


3F 


EO 


00 


IF 


68 


C4 30: 


2 


90 


03 


EE 


1A 


C5 


29 


OF 


CC 


C600: 


EO 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


FE 


C43S; 


09 


30 


8D 


3 A 


04 


AD 


09 


DC 


DO 


C60S: 


IE 


7C 


00 


3C 


F8 


00 


7F 


FE 


56 


C440: 


AA 


29 


FO 


4 A 


4A 


4 A 


4A 


09 


37 


C610: 


00 


7F 


FE 


00 


00 


FE 


00 


00 


8D 


C448: 


30 


8D 


3C 


04 


8A 


29 


OF 


09 


12 


C618: 


7C 


00 


00 


94 














































i 


MOY! 141 



SKETCHER 



FROM PAGE 92 



An assembler is required for entry of this program! 
See introductory article beginning on page 92. 



1 * 

2 * SKETCHER 

3 * 

4 ORG $8000 

5 * 

6 COLOR EQU $10 

7 BASE EQU $2000 

8 SCROLY EQU $D011 

9 VMCSB EQU $D018 

10 COLMAP EQU $0400 

11 * 

12 UMAX EQU 320 

13 VMAX EQU 200 

14 HHID EQU 160 

15 VHID EQU 100 

16 * 

17 SCRLEN EQU 8000 

18 HAPLEN EQU 1000 

19 * 

20 TEMPA EQU $FB 

21 TEMPB EQU TEMPA+2 

22 * 

23 TABPTR EQU TEMPA 

24 TABSIZ EQU $9000 

25 * 

26 HPSN EQU TABSIZ+2 

27 VPSN EQU IIPSN+2 

28 CHAR EQU VPSN+1 

29 ROW EQU CHAR+1 

30 LINE EQU ROW+1 

31 BYTE EQU LINE+1 

32 Birr EQU BYTE+2 

33 * 

34 HPRL EQU BITr+1 

35 MPRH EQU MPRL+1 

36 MPDL EQU HPRH+1 

37 MPDH EQU MPDL+1 

38 PRODL EQU MPDH+1 

39 PRODH EQU PRODL+1 

40 * 

41 FILVAL EQU PRODII+1 

42 JSV EQU FILVAL+1 

43 * 

44 CIAPRA EQU $DCOO 
43 * 

46 JMP START 

47 * 

48 * BLOCK FILL ROUTINE 

49 * 

50 BLKFIL LDA FILVAL 

51 LDX TABSIZ+1 

52 BEQ FARTPG 

53 LDY 10 

54 FULLPC STA <TABPTR),Y 

55 INY 

56 BNE FULLPG 

57 INC TABPTR+1 

58 DEX 

59 BNE FULLPC, 

60 PAKTPG LDX TABSIZ 

61 BEQ F1NI 

62 LDY 10 

63 PARTLP STA (TABPTR) ,Y 

64 Vftt 

65 DEX 

66 BNE PARTLP 

67 FINI RTS 

68 * 

69 * 16-BIT MULTIPLICATION ROUTINE 

70 * 

71 MULT16 LDA fh 

72 STA PRODL 

73 STA PRODH 

74 LDX *17 

75 CLC 

76 MULT ROR PRODH 

77 ROR PRODL 

78 ROR MPRH 

79 ROR MPRL 



80 BCC CTDOWN 

81 CLC 

82 LDA HPDL 

83 ADC PRODL 

84 STA PRODL 

85 LDA MPDH 

86 ADC PRODH 

87 STA PRODH 

88 CTDOWN DEX 

89 BNE MULT 

90 RTS 

91 * 

92 * PLOT ROUTINE 

93 * 

94 * R0W=VPSN/8 (8-BIT DIVIDE) 

95 * 

96 PLOT LDA VPSN 

97 LSR A 

98 LSR A 

99 LSR A 

100 STA ROW 

101 * 

102 * CHAR-HPSN/8 (16-BIT DIVIDE) 

103 ♦ 

104 LDA HPSN 

105 STA TEMPA 

106 LDA HPSN+1 

107 STA TEMPA+1 

108 LDX 13 

109 DLOOP LSR TEMPA+1 

110 ROR TEMPA 

111 DEX 

112 BNE DLOOP 

113 LDA TEMPA 

114 STA CHAR 

115 * 

116 * LINE-VFSN AND 7 

117 * 

118 LDA VPSN 

119 AND #7 

120 STA LINE 

121 * 

122 + BITT=7-(HPSN AND 7) 

123 * 

124 LDA HPSN 

125 AND 17 

126 STA BITT 

127 SEC 

128 LDA #7 

129 SBC BITT 

130 STA BITT 

131 * 

132 * BYTE=BASE+R0W*HMAX+8*CHAR+l.INE 

133 * 

134 * FIRST MULTIPLY ROW * UMAX 

135 * 

136 LDA ROW 

137 STA KPRL 

138 LDA #0 

139 STA MPRH 

140 LDA KHHAX 

141 STA MPDL 

142 LDA SM1MAX 

143 STA MPDH 

144 JSR MULTI6 
1A5 LDA MPRL 

146 STA TEMPA 

147 LDA MPRL+1 

148 STA TEMPA+1 

149 ♦ 

150 * ADD PRODUCT TO BASE 

151 * 

1 52 CLC 

153 LDA #<BASE 

154 ADC TEMPA 

155 STA TEMPA 

156 LDA f>BASE 

157 ADC TEMPA+1 

158 STA TEMPA+1 



159 * 

160 * MULTIPLY 8 * CHAR 

161 ♦ 

162 LDA »S 

163 STA MPRL 

164 LDA 10 

165 STA MPRH 

166 LDA CHAR 

167 STA MPDL 

168 LDA #0 

169 STA MPDH 

170 JSR MULT16 

171 LDA MPRL 

172 STA TEMPB 

173 LDA MPRH 

174 STA TEMPB+1 

175 * 

176 * ADD LINE 

177 * 

178 CLC 

179 LDA TEMPB 

180 ADC LINE 

181 STA TEMPB 

182 LDA TEMPB+1 

183 ADC 00 

184 STA TEMPB+1 

185 * 

186 * BYTE - TEMPA + TEMPB 

187 * 

168 CLC 

189 LDA TEMPA 

190 ADC TEMPB 

191 STA TEMPB 

192 LDA TEMPA+1 

193 ADC TEMPB+1 

194 STA TEMPB+1 

195 * 

196 * POKE BYTE,PEEK(BYTE)0R2'BIT 

197 * 

198 LDX BITT 

199 INX 

200 LDA 00 

201 SEC 

202 SQUARE ROL 

203 DEX 

204 BNE SQUARE 

205 LDY #0 

206 ORA (TEMPB), Y 

207 STA (TEMPB) ,Y 

208 RTS 

209 * 

210 * MAIN ROUTINE STARTS HERE 

211 * 

212 * FIRST DEFINE BIT MAP AND F.NABLE 

213 * HIGH-RESOLUTION GRAPHICS 

214 * 

215 START LDA «18 

216 STA VMCSB 

217 * 

218 LDA SCROLY 

219 ORA *32 

220 STA SCROLY 

221 * 

222 * SELECT GRAPHICS BANK 1 

223 * 

224 LDA SBD02 

225 ORA #503 

226 STA SDD02 

227 * 

228 LDA $UDOO 

229 ORA #$03 

230 STA $DDOO 

231 * 

232 * CLEAR BIT MAP 

233 * 

234 LDA #0 

235 STA FILVAL 

236 LDA #<BASE 

237 STA TABPTR 



142 AHOY! 



238 




[.DA 


#>BASE 


301 




JMP 


DOIT 


364 




JMP 


HCHECK 


239 




STA 


TABPTR+1 


302 


* 






365 


RAISE 


INC 


VPSN 


240 




LDA 


KSCRLEN 


303 DOWN 


JSR 


MOVEDN 


366 




JMP 


HCHECK 


211 




STA 


TABSIZ 


304 




JMP 


DOIT 


367 


LOWER 


LDA 


#VMAX-1 


242 




LDA 


*>SCRLEN 


305 


* 






368 




STA 


VPSN 


243 




STA 


TABSIZ+1 


306 


LEFT 


LDX 


HPSN 


369 


* 






244 




JSR 


BLKFII. 


yn 




LDY 


HPSN+1 


370 


HCHECK 


BIT 


HPSN+1 


245 * 








308 




TXA 




371 




BPL 


OKLOW 


246 * 


SET 


BKC AND L: 


309 




BNF. 


DECLSB 


372 




LDA 


#1 


247 * 








310 




DEY 




373 




STA 


HPSN 


248 




LDA 


ffCOLOR 


311 


DECLSB 


DEX 




374 




LDA 


#0 


249 




STA 


FILVAL 


312 




ST* 


HPSN 


375 




STA 


HPSN+1 


250 




LDA 


RCOLMAP 


313 




STY 


HPSN+1 


376 




RTS 




251 




STA 


PABPTR 


314 




JMP 


DOIT 


377 


* 






252 




LDA 


#>COLMAP 


315 


* 






378 OKLOW 


LDA 


KHMAX-2 


253 




STA 


TABPTR+1 


316 


UPANDL 


JSR 


HOVEUP 


379 




CMP 


HPSN 


254 




LDA 


#<HAPLRN 


317 




JMP 


LEFT 


380 




LDA 


#>HMAX-2 


25 r > 




STA 


TABSIZ 


318 


* 






381 




SBC 


HPSN+I 


256 




LDA 


#>MAPLEK 


319 


DNANDL 


JSR 


MOVEDN 


382 




BCC 


TOOHI 


257 




STA 


TABSIZ+1 


320 




JMP 


LEFT 


383 




RTS 




258 




JSR 


BLKFIL 


321 


* 






384 


* 






259 * 








322 


NIL2 


JMP 


READJS 


385 TOOHI 


LDA 


#<HMAX-2 


260 * 


PRINT 


323 


* 






386 




STA 


HPSN 


261 * 








324 


RIGHT 


LDX 


ilPSN 


387 




LDA 


/MMAX-2 


262 




LDA 


IVMID 


325 




LDY 


HPSN+1 


388 




STA 


HPSN+1 


263 




■ 1 A 


VPSH 


326 




INX 




389 




RTS 




264 




LDA 


ftKMID 


327 




BNE 


NOINC 


390 


* 






265 




;ta 


RPSN 


328 




INY 




391 


* PRINT DOT ON SCREEN 


266 




LDA 


f>HMlD 


329 NOINC 


STX 


IlPSN 


392 


* 






267 




STA 


KPSN+1 


330 




STY 


HPSN+1 


393 PRINT 


JSR 


CHECK 


268 




JSR 


PRINT 


331 




JMP 


DOIT 


394 




JSR 


PLOT 


269 * 








332 


* 






395 


* 






270 * 


READ Ji 


333 


UPANDR 


JSR 


MOVEUP 


396 




LDA 


HPSN 


27] ♦ 








334 




JMP 


RIGHT 


397 




PHA 




272 * 


FIRST 1 


TRIGGER BUTTON 


335 


* 






398 




LDA 


HPSN+1 


273 • 








336 


DNANDR 


JSR 


MOVEDN 


399 




PHA 




274 READJS 


LDA 


CIAPRA 


337 




JMP 


RIGHT 


400 


* 






275 




AND 


#$10 


338 


* 






401 




LDA 


HPSN 


276 




BEQ 


START 


339 


* SUBROUTINES ' MOVE UP & DOWN 


402 




BNE 


SKIP 


277 * 








340 


* 






403 




DEC 


HPSN+1 


278 * 


NOW 


READ JOYST 


341 


HOVEUP 


LDX 


VPSN 


404 


SKIP 


DEC 


HPSN 


279 * 








342 




DEX 




405 




JSR 


CHECK 


280 




LDA 


#$0F 


343 




STX 


VPSN 


406 




JSR 


PLOT 


281 




I'll A 




344 




RTS 




407 


+ 






282 




AND 


CIAPRA 


345 


* 






408 




PLA 




283 




STA 


JSV 


346 


MOVEDN 


LDX 


VPSN 


409 




STA 


HPSN+1 


284 




PI.A 




347 




TNX 




410 




PLA 




285 




SEC 




348 




STX 


VPSN 


411 




STA 


HPSN 


286 




SBC 


JSV 


349 




RTS 




412 




RTS 




287 




STA 


JSV 


350 


* 






413 


* 






288 * 








351 


* "DOIT 


" SUBROUT 


414 


RELADS 


DFB 


UP-M0DR1 


•im 




TAX 




352 


* 






415 




DFB 


DOWN-M0DR1 


290 




BEQ 


REAMS 


353 


DOIT 


JSR 


PRINT 


416 




DFB 


NIL1-M0DR1 


291 




LDA 


RBUDS-l.X 


354 




JMP 


READJS 


417 




DFB 


LEFT-M0DR1 


292 




STA 


HODRBL+1 


355 


* 






418 




DFB 


UPANDL-M0DR1 


293 MODREL 


ONE 


* 


356 


* MORE 


SUBROUTIN 


419 




DFB 


DNANDL-MODRI 


294 M0DR1 






357 


* 






420 




DFB 


NIL2-M0DR1 


295 * 








358 


* MAKE SUS 


421 




DFB 


RIGHT-H0DR1 


296 NIL1 


JMP 


READJS 


359 


* 






422 




DFB 


UPANDR-M0DR1 


297 » 








360 CHECK 


LDA 


VPSN 


423 




DFB 


DNANDR-M0DR1 


298 * 


R0UTIN1 


361 




BEQ 


RAISE 


424 


* 






299 * 








362 




CMP 


JVMAX-1 










300 UP 


■ 


JSR 


MOVEUP 


363 




BCS 


LOWER 











ALARM CLOCK 

FROM PAGE 99 

•100 P0KE56,158:CLR KA 

-110 PRINT"[CIJ<AR][U"[ DOWN]"] [10" [RIGHT] 

"]ONE MOMENT PLEASE [ 3". "]" HA 

• 120 FORAD=40449TO40739: READOP: CK-CK+OP: P 

OK BAD, OP: NEXT PG 

•130 IFCK<>3116TTHENPRINT"[CLEAR]ERR0R IM 

DATA STATEMENTS .": STOP \'G 

•140 PM=0:TNPUT"icLRAR]WEIAV [3 THE HOUR"; 



H;IFH<00RH>23THEN140 HG 

•150 IFH=OTHENH=12;GOT0180 CP 

•160 IFH>12THENH=H-12:PM=-1 Til 

•170 IFPM=OTHENGOSUB420 NO 

•180 IFH»12THENPM«N0T PM DE 

•190 NUM=H:GOSUB370:POKE56331 ,-128*PM+16* 

FD+SD KN 

•200 INPUT" [ DOWN ]WHAT IS THE MINUTE" ;M: IF 

M<00RM>59THEN140 NO 

•210 NUM=M:GOSUB370:POKE56330,16*FD+SD EG 
■220 INPUT" [DOWN] WHAT IS THE SECOND" ;S:IF 

S<0ORS>59THEN140 BE 



AHOY! 143 



IMPORTANT I Lel,ers on whilB background are Bug Repellent line codes. Do not enter them! Pages 113 and 116 explain these codes 
IIYII UniMII I . and provide other essential information on entering Ahoy! programs. Refer to these pages before entering any programs! 



•230 NUM=S:GOSUB370:P0KE56329,16*FD+SD AE 
•240 PRINT" [DOWN] [DOWN] CONTINUOUS TIME DI 
SPLAY? ([RVS0N]Y[RVS0FF]/[RVS0N]N[RVS0FF 

])" PB 

250 GETA$:IFA$=' m THEN250 UK 

260 IFA$="N"THENPOKE40739,0 PM 

270 PM=0: INPUT" [CLEAR] WHAT IS THE ALARM 

HOUR" ; AH :IFAH<OORAH>23THEN270 HB 

280 IFAH>12THENAH=AH-12:PM— 1 DC 

290 IFPM=0THENG0SUB420 NO 
300 NUM-AH: GOSUB370: P0KE40737 ,-128*PM+16 

*FD+SD ME 
310 INPUT "[D0WN]WHAT IS THE ALARM MINUT 

E" ; AM: IFAM<00RAM>59THEN270 LC 
320 NUM=AM:GOSUB370:POKE40738,16*FD+SD PH 
330 PRINT" [DOWN] [DOWN] AUDIO ALARM? ([RVS 

ON]Y[RVSOFF]/[RVSON]N[RVSOFF])" KN 

340 GETA$:IFA$=""THEN340 HK 

350 IFA$="N"THENP0KE40680,0 OP 

360 SYS40449: PRINT" [CLEAR]": END PL 

370 REM ** SUBROUTINE CJ 
380 A$=STR$(NUM) :IFLEN( A$)=3THENFD=VAL(M 

ID$(A$,2,1)):GOT0400 NJ 

390 FD=0 HB 

400 SD-VAL(RIGHT$(A$,1)) EL 

410 RETURN IM 

420 REM ** SUBROUTINE CJ 
430 PRINT"[DOWN][RVS0N]A[RVSOFF]M OR [RV 

S0N]P[RVS0FF]M" CC 

440 GETA$:IFA$=""THEN440 HH 

450 IFA$="P"THENPM=-1 AK 

460 RETURN IM 

40449 DATA120, 173,20,3,73,40 PD 

40455 DATA141, 20, 3, 173,21,3 OB 

40461 DATA73, 116,141, 21,3,88 OG 

40467 DATA 169, 0,141,8,220,96 CN 

40473 DATA173,35,159,240,121,160 BH 

40479 DATA31, 173, 32, 208, 153,0 DN 

40485 DATA 2 16, 200, 192, 40, 208, 248 GL 

40491 DATA173.il, 220, 41, 16, 74 10 

40497 DATA 74, 74, 74, 9, 176,201 CB 

40503 DATA176,208,2,169,160,141 KG 

40509 DATA31 ,4,173, 11, 220,41 BC 

40515 DATA15, 9, 176, 141,32,4 OF 

40521 DATA 173 ,11, 220, 41, 128, 240 PE 

40527 DATA8,169,144,141,39,4 PB 

40533 DATA76,93,158,169,129,141 HO 

40539 DATA39,4,169,186,141,33 GH 

40545 DATA4, 173,10,220,41,112 HH 

40551 DATA 74, 74,74,74,9, 176 ME 

40557 DATA141,34,4,173,10,220 LB 

40563 DATA41,15,9,176,141,35 NM 

40569 DATA4,169,186,141,3G,4 EM 

40575 DATA173,9,220,41,112,74 UK 

40581 DATA74,74,74,9,176,141 CA 

40587 DATA37,4,173,9,220,41 NE 

40593 DATA15,9,176,141,38,4 AL 

40599 DATA 173, 11, 220, 4 1,1 59, 205 JN 

40605 DATA33,159,208,100,173,10 OL 

144 AHOY! 



•40611 DATA220,41,127,205,34,159 IP 

•40617 DATA208.90, 173,2, 159,208 10 

•40623 DATA36, 169, 181, 141, 0,212 NB 

•40629 DATA 169, 23, 141, 1,21 2, 169 EK 

■40635 DAT AO, 14 1,5, 2 12, 169, 240 AC 

•40641 DATA141 ,6,212, 169,33, 141 JE 

•40647 DATA4, 212, 173,32,208, 141 LG 

•40653 DATA3,159,169,255,141,2 LG 

•40659 DATA 159, 206, 32, 159,208,38 JB 

•40665 DATA174,32,208,236,3,159 LJ 

•40671 DATA208, 14, 173,4, 159, 141 EK 

•40677 DATA32,208,169,15,141,24 HK 

•40683 DATA212,76,250, 158, 173,3 EC 

•40689 DATA 159, 14 1,32, 208, 169,0 KJ 

•40695 DATA141,24,212,169,30,141 ON 

•40701 DATA32, 159,76,26, 159,0 NK 

■40707 DATA0,10,173,2 f 159,240 PP 

■40713 DATA16,173,3,159,141,32 GP 

■40719 DATA208, 169, 0,141, 24, 212 DM 

•40725 DATA169, 0,141, 2, 159,173 HI 

•40731 DATA8,220,76,49,234,30 CM 

•40737 DATAO, 0,255 OE 

BASIC RELOCATOR 

FROM PACE 30 

•1 SYS2063:END:REM"[61"A"] JE 

• 2 REMAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA KE 

•900 REM JD 

•910 REM SAVE THIS PROGRAM TO DISK BEFORE 

RUNNING IT OB 

•920 REM MAKE SURE THE REM STATEMENTS ARE 

PACKED WITH THE PROPER AMOUNT OF A'S LC 
•930 REM TO RUN, TYPE 'RUN1000'. 

NOT 'RUN* XF 

•940 REM JD 

•1000 POKE2049,133:CK=0: FORX=2063TO2182: 

READ A: CK=CK+A: POKEX.A: NEXT GM 
•1010 IF CKOH741 THEN PRINT"ERR0R IN DA 

TA STATEMENTS": STOP DA 

■1020 DATA 172,122,160,56,173,130,8,133,4 

4,233,8,133,25,24,165,45 OH; 

•1030 DATA 133,27,133,29,165,46,133,28,10 

1,25,133,30,133,46,165,27 JO 

•1040 DATA 208,4,198,28,198,30,198,27,198 

,29,177,27,145,29,165,27 DA 

•1050 DATA 208,244,165,28,201,8,208,230,2 

30,29,177,29,200,17,29,240 PH 

•1060 DATA 21,24,177,29,101,25,145,29,133 

,2,136,177,29,133,29,165 PJ 

■1070 DATA 2,133,30,76,73,8,174,110,160,1 

42,120,2,142,123,2,162 JO 

•1080 DATA 49,142,119,2,162,82,142,121,2, 

162,117,142,122,2,162,5 HA 

•1090 DATA 134,198,96 JO 

•1100 DATA 16: REM PAGE TO TRANSFER TO FA 
■1110 DATA 34,0,0,0 AJ 



INFRARAID 

Continued from page 112 

(Note that the last zero in line 10 is printed in white, indi- 
cating where TXTPTR is pointing.) 
Try other examples such as 

10 A=X/0 

10 A=A$ 

10 ?:?CHR$(-1):? 

A special case that needs to be discussed further is that of 
the READ-DATA statements. Try these examples and note any 
differences in how they arc handled: 

10 READ A 

10 READ A 
20 PRINT 

10 READ A 

20 DATA "STRING" 

In the first example, READ is being pointed at by TXTPTR; 
therefore it is displayed in white. In the second example, how- 
ever, READ is not displayed in white because TXTPTR does 
not point to it. What happens is that BASIC searches the en- 
tire text for DATA statements and if one is not found, TXTPTR 
is pointing to the end of the program, but CURLIN, the current 
BASIC text line number, is still pointing to the line where the 
READ originated. When Infmraid prints the current line it 
compares the address of the character it is printing to 
TXTPTR; when, and only then, will that character be printed 
in white. In the example it never matched the addresses, so 
no character in that line was highlighted. This is always the 
case unless the READ statement is on the last text line in a 
program and there are no DATA statements. 

In the third example above the DATA line is displayed, since 
the error occurred in that line rather than the READ line. The 
DATA item searched for is numeric, and since the first char- 
acter in the DATA line is non-numeric, an error was genera- 
ted. Note that BASIC displayed a ?SYNTAX ERROR even 
though technically it should have been a ?TYPE MISMATCH 
ERROR. Also note that this could be quite handy debugging 
programs with large amounts of data where there is both nu- 
meric and non- numeric data, since Infmmid shows you ex- 
actly which data caused the error. 

This feature of pinpointing errors alone can be quite help- 
ful in debugging programs, but Infmraid can also trap some 

TABLE 3 

Variable pointer to the line bomber 

off your BASIC error routine 



Range of values for EL% 



1 to 32767 
-32768 to -1537 
-1536 to -1 



Range of line numbers pointed to 

none {deactivated) 

1 to 32767 
32768 to 63999 
64000 to 65535 (illegal) 



errors within the program. The problem I had with my calcu- 
lator simulation program was not a program bug but a system 
limitation. I had to keep the program from crashing when hand- 
ling larger numbers than BASIC would normally allow, 
Infmmid lets you do that using the trap variable TR% (refer 
to Table 2). Try this example: 



10 

20 



TR%=1 
PRINT 



lOt 100 



Notice that the number 332.192809 was printed rather than 
an error message. What Infmraid did was check the variable 
TR% when the error was generated in line 20. Since the first 
bit in TR% was set, Infmmid passed control back to the BASIC 
routine instead of recognizing the error. The BASIC routine 
then executed as if no overflow error occurred and it printed 
the number it had previously calculated. Note that the displayed 
number is garbage and must be treated as such. When trap- 
ping errors in this manner, always check ER% to determine 
whether an error occurred or not. When a program is run, 
ER% is set to 0; however, when ER% is set by an error, the 
program must reset it to 0. In the above example, for instance, 
you could add: 

30 IF ER%=15 THEN ER%=0:G0TO (wherever 
you want) 

In addition to trapping certain errors, Infmmid also lets the 
program jump to its own error handling routine when it en- 
counters a trapped error. The programmer simply specifies 
the line number to jump to in EL% (see Table 3). When In- 
fmraid encounters an error trapped by TR% it will perform 
a GOTO of the line number specified in EL%, if EL% is not 
equal to 0. This example will demonstrate how it works: 

10 EL%=1000:REM ERROR ROUTINE STARTS AT 

1000 

20 TR%=15:REM TRAP ALL POSSIBLE ERRORS 

30 PRINT 10 100: REM TRY DIFFERENT ERROR 

S IN THIS LINE 

40 END 

1000 REM ERROR ROUTINE 

1010 IF ER%=4 THEN PRINT "FILE NOT F0UN 

D" 

1020 IF ER%=5 THEN PRINT "DEVICE NOT PR 

ESENT" 

1030 IF ER%=15 THEN PRINT "OVERFLOW" 

1040 IF ER%=20 THEN PRINT "DIVISION BY 

ZERO" 

1050 ER%=0:REM MUST RESET ER% 

1060 GOTO 40 

As a final note, the RUN/STOP-RESTORE sequence will 
not disable Infmraid. If you wish to do this without rcscting 
the computer use: 

POKE 768, PEEK (50657): POKE 769, PEEK (5065 
8) 

Infmmid was written with the Commodore 64 Macro Assemb- 
ler Deivloprnent System. □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 132 



AHOY! US 



STREAMER 
FONT 

Continued from page 29 

tinue. If yoU enter a null string the SAVE command is 
aborted, and you're taken back to the main program. Press 
SHIFT-L to LOAD your font back into memory. 

Although you can t SAVE a character file on tape, you 
can lack your font on to the end of the program and SAVE 
it along with your program. If you have a program that 
accelerates tape LOADs and SAVEs, this method could 
be an advantage. There is, however, one drawback with 
amalgamating your program and file. The font memory, 
which begins at 8192. is 2K above the program. It cant 
be lowered to follow immediately after the program, as 
the rotated display would be usurped by your compu- 
ter's character information. This is because Streamer 
Font's characters arc stored in memory in a manner sim- 
ilar to sprites, and sprites located below 8192 will not 
be displayed. The upshot of all this is that you must save 
nearly 2K of useless memory along with your program 
and file. Even with this excess baggage, your program/ 
file will still only be H'AK long, a reasonable length 
thanks to the brevity of machine language. 

Here's how to wed your program to your font file. First 
LOAD Sequela using Flankspeed. Then type in NEW. 
Now LOAD Streamer Font and enter the following 
POKES: 

POKES 802 , 1 : POKE45 , : P0KE46 , 42 

The first POKE will set the switch so that the font mem- 
ory is not cleared. The other two will move the BASIC 
end-of-program pointer to the end of the file. If you don't 
wish to add Sequela, just go through the same steps except 
loading the file into memory'. Now SAVE Streamer Font 
as you normally would. Whenever you design a charac- 
ter set with this new program, it will automatically be 
SAVEd with it. 

Finally we get to what Streamer Font is all about: print- 
ing banners! There are two print defaults. One is the size. 
If the size is not set, the program automatically prints the 
smallest size, 2.4 inches high. This can be altered by pressing 
SHIFT 1-5, where 1 is the smallest size. Press SHIFTS 
and your characters will be printed 7.2 inches high. 



The other default is the composition of your charac- 
ters. If this is not reset your letters will be printed with 
the numerical symbol. #. on a background of spaces. To 
change this, press f6. You will then be asked for the fore- 
ground character. Enter the character or graphic sym- 
bol of your choice. After that, you'll be asked if you wish 
this character to be printed in reverse. Answer Y or N. 
Now you'll be queried for a background character. Type 
this in and you'll be taken back to the main program. 

To send your characters to the printer, press fS and you'll 
be prompted to enter your message. Like the SAVE and 
LOAD filenames, you can only edit your input with the 
DEL key, and you can abort by entering a null string. Up 
to 33 characters can be entered at one time, although you 
can easily string several of these together for very long mes- 
sages. Streamer Font will automatically account for SPACEs 
in your messages providing that the background character 
is a space. Since some printers take the time to print spaces, 
this will make for faster printing. If. on the other hand, 
you are using a background character other than CHRS(32). 
you must use an empty character from your font. The left 
margin, incidentally, is adjusted so that your message ap- 
pears centered. Once your message is entered, printing be- 
gins. When it comes to line spacing, no spaces will be 
printed between the lines on Commodore printers. If it's 
necessary to stop printing, you can do so by holding down 
the RUN/STOP key. 

SCQUBLA 

By the time you've finished typing in 4K of machine 
language, you may balk at entering another 2.5K. Even 
so. Streamer Font would be incomplete if I didn't include 
a character set. You'll like Sequela as it's an attractive 
font that can be used for nearly any message. And once 
you've entered and SAVEd it, you can easily alter it to 
suit your whims. To enter Sequela you must again use 
Flankspeed, but unlike Streamer Font, there's no need 
to change any pointers since it will sit well above Flank- 
speed. LOAD and RUN Flankspeed and enter in the hex- 
adecimal addresses. 

Like cassette users, disk users will have to follow a 
few steps to get Sequela into the font memory. First use 
Flankspeed to LOAD Sequela into memory. Type in 
NEW and LOAD Streamer Font, Now POKE5802X En- 
ter RUN and you should sec a large A and B on the 
screen. Press SHIFT-S to SAVE Sequela to disk. □ 
SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 124 



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It's the best-performing modem 

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Mitey Mo is being hailed as 
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Its software has received the endorse- 
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much more, All at your convenience. 

Until Mitey Mo, Commodore's 
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choice when you went looking 
lor a modem for your computer. Like 
Mitey Mo, it has "auto 
answer"— it receives 
data while unattended 
And both modems are 
"auto dialers"— 
you dial right on 
the computer's 
keyboard, But 
that's about 
where the simi- 
larity ends. 

Miiey Mo 
can dial up to 9 







COMMODORE 


MODEM FEATUBES 


MITEY MO 


AUTOMODEM 


Auto Dial/Answer 


YES 


YES 


Auto Redial 


YES 


NO 


Smart 64 Software 


YES 


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Function Keys 






Programmable 


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NO 


Upload/Download 






Text&X-Modem 


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numbers sequentially. But suppose you dial 
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with auto redialing can slip in ahead of you. 
Mitey Mo is menu driven. It lists the things 
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Selecl a number and you're 
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With Mitey Mo, your 
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keys are program- 
mable -you can 
save yourself plenty 

Reader Service No. 257 



of keystrokes. Not so with the other 
modem. And only Mitey Mo lets you 
store data to review or print it later. 

Mitey Mo has just one switch, 
the Smart 64 software does the rest, 
With the other modem you'll have 
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